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Full Disclosure

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NEWS
August 22, 2006
IHOPE I'm not the only one who picks up the irony (or disingenuous hypocrisy, given the Daily News' politics) in your recent editorial on the state Gaming Control Board. You rant about not knowing the exact percentage an individual holds in a partnership that has applied for a license. We already know who these people are, but the apparently important information is what percentage they hold. So you say "in the interests of full disclosure" that Daily News CEO Brian Tierney is a partner in the Trump Street project.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | By Robert Zausner, INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Most of the candidates for governor are promising that, if elected, they'll eliminate Pennsylvania's very own, very secretive version of pork barrel - "walking around money," or WAM. There are good sides to the WAM process, mainly that it can quickly target funds for specific local projects. But WAMs have come under heavy criticism in recent years because the money promised to individual legislators for their home districts is hidden in the budget and not delineated for taxpayers to see. And the expenditures often seem frivolous - like last year's $1,000 for little-league football pants, $2,000 for a Mummers Parade comedy group, $4,000 for a cheerleading program.
NEWS
July 11, 1986 | By Paul Scicchitano, Special to The Inquirer
After coming out last week on the short end of a 2-1 vote that approved pay raises for county elected officials, Montgomery County Commissioner Rita C. Banning yesterday called for those officials who receive a pay raise to disclose all sources of their incomes. "I used to think full disclosure was important only because of conflict- of-interest problems," said Banning, the Democratic minority commissioner. "But I can see now that it is important for county commissioners and county row officers to make full disclosure, since the county commissioners set the salaries.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
House Speaker Thomas S. Foley, denying any effort to cover up congressional check-kiting, said yesterday that the House would vote by tomorrow on an ethics committee report that would conceal the names of all but 24 members who wrote bad checks. But even as Foley repeated his support for partial disclosure, members in both parties called for naming all members who wrote checks on the now-defunct House bank without sufficient funds to cover them. Republican members of the House ethics committee said yesterday that they would introduce a proposal today calling for disclosure of the full list of members who overdrew their accounts at the House bank.
NEWS
January 21, 1987
What right does City Council have to distribute my hard-earned money (as a taxpayer) to any group without knowing specifically what the money is to be used for? How audacious of Sam Evans to request $600,000 and then say that he will not tell what the money is to be used for until after he gets the grant. And why would City Council even consider his requests without the full disclosure for the use of the requested money? Since I have to account for my money, why should Mr. Evans not have to acount for the money he is requesting as a grant?
NEWS
September 1, 2010 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I've been seeing a really great guy, "Joe. " The relationship looks like it's going to jell into something more permanent. He works with my stepdad, and so knows my parents. The problem is that my mother was abusive to my sisters and me while we were growing up. In addition to physical abuse, she used to regularly tell us that she hated us and wished we would all die or run away so that she'd never have to look at us again. It's taken me many years and much therapy to move past this, but I will always carry the emotional scars.
NEWS
December 11, 2001
IT'S A SIMPLE enough request: Tell us what you paid several sub-contractors who took part in Edison, Inc's $2.7 million "study. " That was all state Sen. Vince Fumo asked for in a letter sent to Edison, Inc. last Tuesday. It was all the Daily News asked for a week earlier when connecting the dots between Edison and two associates of Mayor Street. "As a matter of policy in this project," Edison' s Adam Tucker told the Daily News, "we won't release dollar amounts. " What makes this project so different?
SPORTS
September 7, 2001 | By Gail Shister INQUIRER TELEVISION COLUMNIST
Nothing is official, but former 76ers president Pat Croce is expected to join NBC Sports as a member of its NBA studio show. The hyperkinetic Croce auditioned in New York last week for a spot on The NBA on NBC, an NBC Sports spokesman confirmed yesterday. Croce is just one of "a number" of prospects who have auditioned, the spokesman said. "We will make our talent announcements in due course. " The NBA on NBC airs before games and during halftime. Last season's lineup featured Ahmad Rashad as host, with ex-Phoenix Suns star Kevin Johnson, former Golden State Warriors coach P.J. Carlesimo, and New York Post reporter Peter Vecsey as regulars.
NEWS
August 7, 1991
IRAQ CRACK Saddam Hussein is confident that U.N. inspectors will never find his stash of nuclear materials. He hid them in a theater showing "Hudson Hawk. " - Johnny Carson WHAT'S UP DOC? Alongside AIDS testing for the medical profession, full disclosure should be required of taste-dead doctors who drive megabuck foreign sportscars with dumb vanity license plates (like the Jag seen tooling through Cherry Hill with the plate "FORCEPS"). - Kathleen Shea GOLDEN SLIPPERS If they keep cutting back music in the schools, what are we going to do for Mummers?
NEWS
May 28, 1992 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
Two brothers who founded Metrobank, a small Center City financial institution, have sued the firm's directors in federal court, alleging "self- dealing," "insider loans" and other improper banking practices. "It's all bull - - - -," said City Controller Jonathan Saidel, a bank director and one of the named defendants, when informed by a reporter that the suit had been filed on Tuesday by Raymond and Jerome Weisbein, the bank's founders. Saidel said he hadn't been served with a copy of the lawsuit and therefore couldn't comment.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 26, 2014
The disclosure of a state Ethics Commission inquiry this week is yet another hopeful sign that four Philadelphia legislators will finally be held accountable, if allegations prove true that they accepted cash offered as bribes during an undercover investigation that state Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane shut down upon taking office. The ethics panel review comes on the heels of a welcome decision by Philadelphia District Attorney Seth Williams to put the sting allegations before an investigative grand jury.
NEWS
May 14, 2014
Campaign litter I wonder if congressional candidate Brendan F. Boyle would let me know where he lives so that, on my next trash day, instead of leaving my trash at the curb to be picked up, I can spread it around his neighborhood for all to see. If he doesn't think this is a good idea, why is he leaving his trash - that is, political signs - all over my neighborhood? It's trash and an eyesore, and I expect better from anyone seeking my vote. Ken Myers, Lafayette Hill Disclosure salute Responding to a letter from a group of retired Pennsylvania judges, only 11 of 47 congressional candidates in the Pennsylvania Primary committed to support federal legislation that would require full, complete, and immediate disclosure of all contributions exceeding $10,000.
NEWS
April 21, 2014
After attempting to clear himself in the George Washington Bridge scandal with a report he commissioned, Gov. Christie has relaunched his presidential campaign. Hence his cynical declaration last week that campaign contribution limits should be scrapped. Instead of restrictions, the governor said, there should be quick and thorough disclosure. But Christie has a history of fighting disclosure. He has stonewalled public-records requests, forcing citizens to sue for information. He has used the Republican Governors Association, which he chairs, to travel the nation bolstering his presidential aspirations, while refusing to disclose what the state has spent to enable his security entourage to accompany him on out-of-state political trips.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Meghan Lane-Fall, For The Inquirer
What if your doctor made you sicker by doing what he was supposed to do and providing the standard of care? The question isn't an idle one. My friend Amy Reed is facing death after undergoing a procedure that hundreds of thousands of women have each year. She had a hysterectomy to deal with a benign tumor called a fibroid. After her sixth child, it made more sense to have her womb removed instead of dealing with low blood counts and frequent doctor visits. A doctor herself, she needed the energy to juggle clinical practice, a lab, a bustling home, and her husband, a driven cardiothoracic surgeon.
BUSINESS
November 2, 2013 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Twitter is the new IPO on the block, but it isn't yet profitable like its social-networking rivals Facebook and LinkedIn were before their initial public offerings. Twitter is different in one other aspect as well: Under the new JOBS Act provisions, the soon-to-be-public company doesn't have to disclose key financials. Twitter is not something retail investors should buy until after its IPO comes to market and they get a more transparent look at its finances. The JOBS Act's Title II allows companies with less than $1 billion in revenue not to disclose some important data.
NEWS
May 13, 2013 | By Craig R. McCoy and Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Staff Writers
Former Gov. Ed Rendell and former Mayor W. Wilson Goode have launched a fund-raising effort to pay the legal bills of U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's son, who has been under federal investigation for months. Rendell said he agreed to pitch in after Rep. Fattah contacted him for help. Rendell, in an interview, estimated that the Philadelphia congressman and his wife had spent $250,000 to help Chaka "Chip" Fattah Jr., 30, and said the costs had become a "little bit of a struggle" for the family.
NEWS
March 5, 2013 | By Troy Graham, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Citing concerns about the accuracy of a citywide reassessment that is key to overhauling Philadelphia's broken property-tax system, Controller Alan Butkovitz called Monday for the "full disclosure of the mechanics of this process. " In a letter to Mayor Nutter, Butkovitz questioned the findings of the Office of Property Assessment (OPA), which said the reassessment was comfortably within industry standards. That standard says assessments should be on average within 15 percent of sales prices.
SPORTS
August 24, 2012 | By Kerith Gabriel, Daily News staff Writer
I'M TRYING to buy into it, I really am. That is, the Union mantra: In the long run, youth ultimately will trump experience. But with the way this season has gone, it's not easy to believe. When you look around at the rest of Major League Soccer, clubs boasting experienced talent aren't the ones struggling to make the playoff picture right now. If the Union removes the interim tag from manager John Hackworth's title (and, at this point, I truly believe it's just a matter of when, considering the turnaround he's made with what he has)
NEWS
August 4, 2012 | By Patrick Kerkstra, For The Inquirer
The Benjamin Franklin Parkway is rather like Philadelphia as a whole: There's a lot to love about the place, but the sight of so much squandered potential can be hard to take. From Eakins Oval, looking northwest at the monumental steps and edifice of the Art Museum, the scene is magnificent. But turn around 180 degrees, and you're staring at a parking lot inexplicably situated on some of the most prime public real estate in the city. The new Sister Cities Park, across 18th Street from the Cathedral Basilica of SS. Peter and Paul, may just be the most captivating 1.75 acres in the city, capturing, as Inquirer architecture critic Inga Saffron wrote, " the refined whimsy of Paris' Luxembourg Gardens " and packing it "into a space a quarter the size of Rittenhouse Square.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2012
Question: Eight months ago, after a brief illness, my 57-year-old friend's husband passed away. Their marriage had always been a bit rocky, and after his death we learned that he'd been involved in some questionable activities. Needless to say, her emotions ran the gamut from disbelief to anger to grief. During this time, I was there for her to listen, care, and encourage, and supported her decision to seek professional counseling. But now I'm concerned she might be moving too quickly through this process.
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