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NEWS
June 9, 1997 | By Eric Dyer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Full time is the only way to go if the Gloucester County Institute of Technology is to remain a viable educational alternative in the area, a special panel has suggested. After four months studying the institution's future, the seven-member group presented a plan to the Gloucester County Board of Freeholders last week that would make the GCIT a full-day school for students in ninth through 12th grades. GCIT Superintendent Victor Morella said in a recent interview that the adoption of statewide core-curriculum standards last year, plus shrinking state aid to shared-time schools such as the institute prompted the review.
BUSINESS
May 23, 2012 | Harold Brubaker
La Salle University hired Aramark Corp. to run its dining services. Under the contract with Aramark, all of La Salle's current full-time food services employees will maintain their La Salle years of service and their eligibility for tuition remission, and have a comparable health-insurance plan, said Jon Caroulis, a spokesman for the Philadelphia university. The La Salle operation employs 100 full time and 60 part time, he said. Aramark's higher education division manages food services for more than 600 colleges and universities in North America, according to the company.
NEWS
January 16, 2012
WE WERE informed, upon returning from the holiday break, that we were losing our nurse, from full time to three days a week. We miss the district's threshold level for qualifying for a full-time nurse, which is 850. We have 838 students, many of whom are medically fragile students with myriad health issues that require medical attention on site. The Philadelphia Federation of Teachers has advised all of its constituents not to assist with the dispensing of medicine, which then falls to the administrators.
NEWS
November 27, 1988 | By Adrienne Shaw, Special to The Inquirer
The routine traffic check that Patrolman Joseph Wilson made one evening in East Fallowfield began like all the rest. A driver was stopped and arrested for having a suspended license. Then the routine became unpredictable. This particular driver was a fugitive, wanted in Avondale. Wilson was to become his next victim. After returning to the East Fallowfield police station on Strasburg Road, the suspect suddenly went berserk, grabbing Wilson's night stick and beating the policeman to the ground.
NEWS
October 26, 2012 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
For eight years, Isaak Ivitsky ran a computer system at a Chester County company, receiving glowing reviews from his boss. Then a new manager took over. First came harassment, Ivitsky says, followed by a bad review and finally, outsourcing of his job. "It was age discrimination," charged the 66-year-old Cherry Hill resident, one of nearly 3,000 hopefuls Wednesday at Camden County's semiannual job fair at the Collingswood Ballroom. Along with the county freeholder board and One-Stop Resource Center, the event's sponsors were the state Department of Labor and Workforce Development and various Camden County agencies.
NEWS
March 11, 2011 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greg Wade had 60 days to get a job or go to prison for embezzling almost $138,000 in scholarship money from the Philadelphia Home and School Council. The judge's deadline was Thursday, and Wade, the council's disgraced former president, came before Common Pleas Court Judge Joan A. Brown with a job. Barely. Wade, 55, told Brown that he was working for $7.35 an hour in maintenance at a South Philadelphia supermarket. He began last week. He worked eight hours. Brown, who was talking about a full-time job, gave Wade another 60 days, ordering him to return to court May 12 - or go to jail.
SPORTS
March 7, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - They shuffled in, one by one, taking their turns, and the balls came fast and furious. And it wasn't even 9 a.m. Michael Young, Kevin Frandsen and Cody Asche - the former All-Star, the utility infielder and the prospect - got their own wake-up calls at third base on the short field at the Carpenter Complex. "He was just hammering them at me," Young said later. As is their morning ritual, the practice before the practice, Young and his fellow third basemen got extra infield work with new third base coach and infield instructor Ryne Sandberg on Monday morning, before the team's trip to Bradenton.
NEWS
June 15, 2012
W ITH SCHOOLS letting out and the weather heating up, Friday marks the unofficial start of summer in Philadelphia. While summer marks the beginning of many great things, it's also a time when our city's youth have a lot of free time on their hands. One of the consequences is an annual rise in crime and violence. Although common in most cities, it's particularly true in Philadelphia, where far too many of our children become vulnerable to negative forces during breaks from school.
NEWS
April 15, 2011
A University of Illinois at Chicago survey finds Philadelphia among the 12 best cities at providing investors with financial information online. It may seem odd to think of cities needing to provide investor relations services in addition to picking up the trash, putting out fires, and arresting criminals. But the U.S. municipal bond market is estimated to be $3 trillion. So you'd hope the issuers of all that debt would be diligent in keeping the buyers of that paper informed. Wrong.
NEWS
August 3, 2011 | By Kevin Freking, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Aides to Rep. Gabrielle Giffords said Tuesday she wants to return to her job in Washington if her physical and mental recovery allows it. A day after she stunned colleagues by appearing on the House floor to vote for the debt-ceiling deal, Giffords planned to return to Houston on Tuesday after meeting privately with staff. It's unclear when she'll return to work. Spokesman C.J. Karamargin told the Associated Press that she is eager to return but can't make decisions yet about whether to seek reelection in 2012.
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SPORTS
April 10, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THE NFL announced yesterday it had hired its first-ever full-time female official. It took nearly 95 years for the league - founded in August of 1920 - to change its stripes. So it's about time. "If you look at Sarah's background and her journey to get here, this is not something that happened overnight," Dean Blandino, the NFL's officiating director, said on a national conference call with the media to discuss the hiring of Sarah Thomas. "She's been on our radar screen for 8 to 9 years and a part of our development program for 2. " Thomas' history-making achievement comes with an asterisk as Shannon Eastin, who worked regular-season NFL games in 2012, was technically the first female official.
NEWS
November 23, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Albie Crosby sat in his office last week, roughly four hours before the start of Imhotep Charter's football practice. His overnight, full-time job at a golf course ended at 7 a.m. An hour later, as usual on weekdays, Crosby was at the West Oak Lane charter school. Unlike on most Public League teams, Imhotep's coach does not work at the school. Crosby is a $3,000-a-year, part-time employee. "I don't do anything here. But I know every one of those kids can walk by, see the light on, and know that Coach Albie is here," Crosby said.
NEWS
August 16, 2014 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia heavyweight boxer Bryant Jennings returned to work at Center City's Federal Reserve Bank week after his last fight. He had not been there since March as he was preparing for his split-decision win last month that secured him a shot at the World Boxing Council title. And the win allowed him the chance to give his employer his two-week notice. Friday is the heavyweight's last day at work. For the first time in his career he will be a full-time boxer. He said he could have just quit, but wanted to give his notice as a way of thanking the bank for being flexible around his boxing career.
NEWS
July 2, 2014 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
EVERYONE SAYS the same thing: The best thing an ex-con can do is get a job. Even after spending nearly two decades behind bars, Colwin Williams - the ex-con I've written about since his release in 2012 - said he wouldn't truly feel free without one. A full-time one. Well, Independence Day came early this year for Williams. "It's official," he texted. "I got the full-time outreach worker position!" Williams, who had previously worked part time as a violence mediator with Philadelphia CeaseFire-Cure Violence, will now work full time for the anti-violence program.
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA -- Michael DiBenedetto was too busy getting an education to enjoy college the first time around. The retired Medford special-education teacher was working full time. He attended classes full time, and commuted to Rowan University in Glassboro while living at home. But decades after earning the sheepskins, the 61-year-old DiBenedetto got a chance to go back to school for one day without the pressure of keeping up the GPA. On Sunday, he and about 1,200 other students packed two conference rooms at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown for One Day University, a traveling adult education program that offers attendees the opportunity to explore subjects for fun. During the day, a faculty of professors from the nation's most prestigious universities delivered 50-minute lectures on their areas of expertise.
SPORTS
December 6, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
JAMES CASEY played 12 offensive snaps last Sunday, 25 more on special teams, where he has become a key cog. Casey prepares, though, as if he's going to take every snap, every week. Casey, 29, takes pride in being the first Eagle at NovaCare every morning. He got into that habit in Houston, where he played his first four seasons, before signing with the Eagles as a free-agent tight end last spring. "In Houston, I would get to the stadium at 4:45 [a.m.], 5 o'clock, most days," Casey said.
FOOD
June 7, 2013 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
I pulled into the muddy lot between the train tracks and the old sandwich shack, and John Bucci Jr. was waiting. It was after hours at John's Roast Pork in South Philadelphia, but his clean white apron was pulled taut around his waist. And as the garlicky smell of roasting picnic hams rubbed in rosemary wafted from the luncheonette to greet me, Bucci pumped his fists skyward and broke into a victory dance. "You're back!" he said. But the shocker here was that John Bucci Jr. was back - and glowing healthy against tall odds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By Molly Eichel
MORNINGS ARE LOOKING a little different at Fox 29. Dawn Timmeney , the former NBC10 anchor who was axed in December, is now full time on Fox, where she used to work part time. She'll be hanging with Mike Jerrick , Sheinelle Jones and Kacie McDonnell on "Good Day Philadelphia" more regularly now. Anchor (and former Sexy Single) Thomas Drayton , who usually takes the evening anchor chair, is moving to morning for the foreseeable future. Drayton will now be on 4:30 to 6 a.m. Relative newbie Iain Page will take over the nighttime in Drayton's absence.
SPORTS
March 7, 2013 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - They shuffled in, one by one, taking their turns, and the balls came fast and furious. And it wasn't even 9 a.m. Michael Young, Kevin Frandsen and Cody Asche - the former All-Star, the utility infielder and the prospect - got their own wake-up calls at third base on the short field at the Carpenter Complex. "He was just hammering them at me," Young said later. As is their morning ritual, the practice before the practice, Young and his fellow third basemen got extra infield work with new third base coach and infield instructor Ryne Sandberg on Monday morning, before the team's trip to Bradenton.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
B RITTANY GILLESPIE, 30, of Roxborough, is CEO and lead designer for Petals Lane, a florist and wedding/special-events planner on Ridge Avenue near Harmon Road, Roxborough. Her husband, Michael Phinney, 32, takes care of the books and the event setup and breakdown work. I spoke with Gillespie. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for the biz? A: My husband and I worked at Robertson's in Chestnut Hill and there was no way to move up in the business. We were dating at the time and we just decided to start our own business.
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