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NEWS
July 2, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IS HALF A LOAF enough to save school programs and thousands of education jobs in Philadelphia? State lawmakers and Gov. Corbett cobbled together a patchwork bailout for the Philadelphia school district that's less than half of its $304 million budget gap for the coming school year, which doesn't fully address its long-term problems. Here's what they did do as darkness fell on Harrisburg:   Q. How much money will Philly receive after Gov. Corbett's rescue package? A. The rescue package - including funding in the state budget signed shortly after 10 p.m. by Corbett and other actions - totals more than $140 million for next year.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Barbara Trent has been a teacher for 42 years, including 23 spent corralling cute kindergartners at Cook-Wissahickon Elementary. To see her in action, a lone adult surrounded by scamps, is to be rendered instantly exhausted. Especially this fall, as schools like Cook contend with Gov. Corbett's budget cuts and the institutional chaos of the Philadelphia School District. "I had 17 students last year," Trent said wistfully last week when I popped into her remarkably controlled classroom.
NEWS
May 28, 2015
WE KNEW we were being naïve when we imagined that City Council would come back from the last week's campaigning and roll up its sleeves to address the hard issues of school funding in Philadelphia. Any one of the issues would have been fine: how to come up with the $105 million the district requested of the city, how to fill the $85 million deficit, the erosion of essentials like school nurses and books, or maybe the discouraging disparity - 33 percent, according to a recent study - between funding for rich districts vs. poor ones like ours.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A close look at the government shutdown-dodging agreement to cut federal spending by more than $38 billion reveals that lawmakers significantly eased the fiscal pain by pruning money left over from previous years, using accounting sleight of hand, and going after programs President Obama had targeted anyway. Such moves permitted Obama to save favorite programs - Pell grants for poor college students, health research, and "Race to the Top" aid for public schools, among others - from Republican knives.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | BY RANDY LOBASSO AND BOB PREVIDI
LAST MONTH, Councilwoman Cindy Bass put out a statement highlighting the traffic violence faced by the people in her district. Three of the 10 most dangerous intersections for crashes in the city - Broad and Olney, Chelten and Wayne Avenues, Broad and Lehigh - are all in her 8th District and, in light of that, Bass thinks the city should do something about it. So, she's supporting a much-needed shot in the arm for Philadelphia's aging, crumbling street...
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Panic threatened for a time last week when members of the Northeast Philadelphia Cultural Council learned that no money had been allocated in the state's capital budget for work on the Furey Ellis Building, one of the newer structures on the grounds of the now-closed Philadelphia State Hospital. Their concerns were heightened when spokesmen for the Department of General Services, the state agency responsible for the hospital's buildings and grounds, reported that funding for Furey Ellis had been removed from the budget.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
AS A union representative for SEPTA's locomotive engineers, I applaud the Daily News editorial support for full dedicated funding for SEPTA. Although dedicated funding enjoys strong bipartisan support from legislators in this five-county region, yes votes will also be necessary from those who are not normally sympathetic to the needs of Philadelphia or SEPTA. In order to win their support, several pervasive SEPTA "myths" need to be aggressively countered with the facts. SEPTA is not a bloated bureaucracy that would misspend any dedicated funding increases.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer Staff Writer Robert Zausner contributed to this report
The debate was heated, the stakes high, the question agonizingly familiar: Would SEPTA raise fares? When a majority of the SEPTA board voted yes recently, the decision was predicated on an expectation that next year, things would be different. Next year, state politicians would set aside a predictable and secure funding base for SEPTA, so it could avoid the further decay of its system or the frustrating budget dilemmas of this spring. Only one problem with that expectation: Some of the state's leading politicians have yet to promise they will try to make it come true.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Chris Hand, Special to The Inquirer
If the local business community comes through with funding, the more than 3,000 school-age children in Voorhees Township may get a new playground. The Voorhees Township Committee last Monday agreed to provide the Osage Parent Faculty group with $5,000 toward the purchase of the playground, which would be next door to the Osage Elementary School on Burnt Mill Road. The design of the playground would be similar to one constructed at the Clara Barton school in Cherry Hill last year, according Linda Nichols, a member of the parent-teacher group.
SPORTS
January 27, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Under the threat of losing their baseball team, Allegheny County officials are close to completing a plan to provide public funding for new stadiums for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers. The plan, which could be announced as early as next week, would not only provide a local contribution for the two stadium-starved teams; it would trigger a promise by Gov. Ridge to kick in the state's portion of the funding and provide a blueprint to a solution for the Phillies and Eagles. Only the state's contribution would be left to complete the financing mix of local, state and private sources that a governor's task force has said would be necessary to fund stadium construction in Pennsylvania.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 7, 2016
Gov. Wolf is to deliver his 2016-17 budget address Tuesday. Keep in mind, the 2015-16 budget is still not complete, largely because the Republican majority refuses to consider new revenues to restore the funding that was cut for public education and human services during Gov. Tom Corbett's administration. In his 2016-17 proposal, the governor will request additional money for education, on top of the funding he requested and is continuing to negotiate for in this fiscal year. I applaud and agree with his not backing down on his commitment to adequately fund public education.
NEWS
February 4, 2016 | By Craig R. McCoy and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
After spending campaign money on criminal defense lawyers and public-relations experts, Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen G. Kane is entering her reelection year with a massive debt and relatively little in the bank. Kane, a Democrat, raised not a dollar in 2015 - a year that saw her arrest on criminal charges and the suspension of her law license. She now faces a string of competitors, both Democratic and Republican, who want her job. In her campaign-finance report for 2015, made public Tuesday, the embattled attorney general reported spending $150,000 from donors on defense lawyers and $130,000 for about eight months of public relations advice from Lanny Davis, special counsel to President Bill Clinton during his scandals.
NEWS
February 2, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
Let's say you count on earning $360,000 a year to take care of your many dependents, pay the bills, and stay afloat. You got lucky from 2010 to 2014, when you averaged about $552,000 a year. You were so flush that, in 2015, you gave your dependents a little extra, about $61,100. But last year, you saw your earnings slashed to $36,800. And to make matters worse, this year your earnings will be less, way less. And all along, however, the bills have to be paid, only they'll be higher this year.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"My passion for our region," Devon Perry declares, "is explosive . " Take her word for it: Perry, the interim executive director of Visit South Jersey, has enthusiasm to burn. What her nonprofit destination-marketing organization hasn't got enough of is money. Annual support from the New Jersey Division of Travel and Tourism has declined from $128,000 two years ago to the current $126,000 - even as a study commissioned by the division found tourism-industry sales rising 3.7 percent statewide, to $40 billion, in 2014.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Brian X. McCrone, Staff Writer
Hillary Clinton took a break from Iowa on Wednesday evening to attend a fund-raiser at the Navy Yard in South Philadelphia. The Democratic presidential hopeful arrived shortly after 7:30 p.m. at the headquarters of the financial firm Franklin Square Capital Partners. Roughly 200 people streamed into the recently built office. Entire families were among the crowd, which included Philadelphia Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and his wife, political consultant Dawn Chavous, and the city's acting fire commissioner, Derrick Sawyer.
NEWS
January 29, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Staff Writer
From the outside, the unremarkable building at 2637 N. Fifth St. - Juniata Community Mental Health Clinic's headquarters - looks no different from dozens of other drab structures that line the roads in the city's poverty-stricken Fairhill neighborhood. But, federal authorities say, the building lies at the heart of a fraud worth hundreds of thousands of dollars and one that could leave yet another blemish on the reputation of a Philadelphia political dynasty. On Wednesday, prosecutors accused Renee Tartaglione - the building's owner and daughter of former city elections chief Margaret "Marge" Tartaglione, sister of State Sen. Christine M. Tartaglione (D., Phila.)
NEWS
January 15, 2016 | Peter Dobrin, Staff Writer
The campaign to bring a young Afghan trumpeter from Kabul to the United States to study music has made significant process, and is a little less than $4,000 from reaching its goal. AhmadBaset Azizi's online fund drive has raised about $8,000 since Sunday's Inquirer story detailing his online studies with Philadelphia Orchestra principal trumpeter David Bilger, as well as efforts to bring Azizi to Interlochen Arts Academy in northwest Michigan for intensive music study as a high school senior.
NEWS
January 14, 2016 | By John Timpane, Staff Writer
In an announcement late Monday, the Wilma Theater announced the following big changes: a makeover, a name change, a fund-raising campaign, and the establishment of a permanent company. The theater's "Transformation Fund" has a stated target of $10 million. Main goals include redoing the Wilma lobby to include a cafe and a new second floor, and changes to the theater façade. But they won't be taking down the familiar tall, squiggly, beribboned Wilma neon sign looking out over South Broad Street, inviting visitors to the theater since 1996.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, STAFF WRITER
Insurance giant Nationwide Financial will close its mutual fund office in King of Prussia by next January and transfer the 100 positions to the company's headquarters in Columbus, Ohio, a Nationwide spokesman said Friday. Nationwide's King of Prussia employees were told Thursday that they would be given the opportunity to transfer to Columbus, the spokeman said. Nationwide said its mutual fund operation has $60 billion under management. The company established a local presence in 1999, when it teamed with fund executive Paul J. Hondros to start Villanova Capital Management.
NEWS
January 9, 2016 | By Julia Terruso, Staff Writer
Philadelphia has a plan to cut its prison population by one-third, or about 2,500 inmates, over three years. It just needs some help with the cost. So said the city in a proposal submitted Wednesday to the MacArthur Foundation, seeking $2 million in grants and pledging $2 million in new and existing city money to drive its prison number down by 34 percent. That number currently is about 7,500 inmates, in six facilities and a handful of satellite sites. Faced with soaring jail populations nationwide, particularly for men and women awaiting trial, the foundation issued a "Safety and Justice" challenge to municipalities around the country.
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