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NEWS
July 2, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IS HALF A LOAF enough to save school programs and thousands of education jobs in Philadelphia? State lawmakers and Gov. Corbett cobbled together a patchwork bailout for the Philadelphia school district that's less than half of its $304 million budget gap for the coming school year, which doesn't fully address its long-term problems. Here's what they did do as darkness fell on Harrisburg:   Q. How much money will Philly receive after Gov. Corbett's rescue package? A. The rescue package - including funding in the state budget signed shortly after 10 p.m. by Corbett and other actions - totals more than $140 million for next year.
NEWS
May 28, 2015
WE KNEW we were being naïve when we imagined that City Council would come back from the last week's campaigning and roll up its sleeves to address the hard issues of school funding in Philadelphia. Any one of the issues would have been fine: how to come up with the $105 million the district requested of the city, how to fill the $85 million deficit, the erosion of essentials like school nurses and books, or maybe the discouraging disparity - 33 percent, according to a recent study - between funding for rich districts vs. poor ones like ours.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A close look at the government shutdown-dodging agreement to cut federal spending by more than $38 billion reveals that lawmakers significantly eased the fiscal pain by pruning money left over from previous years, using accounting sleight of hand, and going after programs President Obama had targeted anyway. Such moves permitted Obama to save favorite programs - Pell grants for poor college students, health research, and "Race to the Top" aid for public schools, among others - from Republican knives.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Barbara Trent has been a teacher for 42 years, including 23 spent corralling cute kindergartners at Cook-Wissahickon Elementary. To see her in action, a lone adult surrounded by scamps, is to be rendered instantly exhausted. Especially this fall, as schools like Cook contend with Gov. Corbett's budget cuts and the institutional chaos of the Philadelphia School District. "I had 17 students last year," Trent said wistfully last week when I popped into her remarkably controlled classroom.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Panic threatened for a time last week when members of the Northeast Philadelphia Cultural Council learned that no money had been allocated in the state's capital budget for work on the Furey Ellis Building, one of the newer structures on the grounds of the now-closed Philadelphia State Hospital. Their concerns were heightened when spokesmen for the Department of General Services, the state agency responsible for the hospital's buildings and grounds, reported that funding for Furey Ellis had been removed from the budget.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
AS A union representative for SEPTA's locomotive engineers, I applaud the Daily News editorial support for full dedicated funding for SEPTA. Although dedicated funding enjoys strong bipartisan support from legislators in this five-county region, yes votes will also be necessary from those who are not normally sympathetic to the needs of Philadelphia or SEPTA. In order to win their support, several pervasive SEPTA "myths" need to be aggressively countered with the facts. SEPTA is not a bloated bureaucracy that would misspend any dedicated funding increases.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer Staff Writer Robert Zausner contributed to this report
The debate was heated, the stakes high, the question agonizingly familiar: Would SEPTA raise fares? When a majority of the SEPTA board voted yes recently, the decision was predicated on an expectation that next year, things would be different. Next year, state politicians would set aside a predictable and secure funding base for SEPTA, so it could avoid the further decay of its system or the frustrating budget dilemmas of this spring. Only one problem with that expectation: Some of the state's leading politicians have yet to promise they will try to make it come true.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Chris Hand, Special to The Inquirer
If the local business community comes through with funding, the more than 3,000 school-age children in Voorhees Township may get a new playground. The Voorhees Township Committee last Monday agreed to provide the Osage Parent Faculty group with $5,000 toward the purchase of the playground, which would be next door to the Osage Elementary School on Burnt Mill Road. The design of the playground would be similar to one constructed at the Clara Barton school in Cherry Hill last year, according Linda Nichols, a member of the parent-teacher group.
SPORTS
January 27, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Under the threat of losing their baseball team, Allegheny County officials are close to completing a plan to provide public funding for new stadiums for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers. The plan, which could be announced as early as next week, would not only provide a local contribution for the two stadium-starved teams; it would trigger a promise by Gov. Ridge to kick in the state's portion of the funding and provide a blueprint to a solution for the Phillies and Eagles. Only the state's contribution would be left to complete the financing mix of local, state and private sources that a governor's task force has said would be necessary to fund stadium construction in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | BY RANDY LOBASSO AND BOB PREVIDI
LAST MONTH, Councilwoman Cindy Bass put out a statement highlighting the traffic violence faced by the people in her district. Three of the 10 most dangerous intersections for crashes in the city - Broad and Olney, Chelten and Wayne Avenues, Broad and Lehigh - are all in her 8th District and, in light of that, Bass thinks the city should do something about it. So, she's supporting a much-needed shot in the arm for Philadelphia's aging, crumbling street...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 20, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Since 2008, state funding for higher education has eroded significantly across the country, and Pennsylvania has been one of the hardest-hit states, says a new report being released Thursday. State funding per student for public colleges and universities in Pennsylvania is down 33 percent from 2007-08 when adjusted for inflation, according to the report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a Washington think tank. In March, the Assembly approved the first increase in higher education funding for the 14-university State System of Higher Education since 2008-09.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Stephanie Farr, Staff Writer
Nearly $5.5 million collected from fines for red-light violations at 28 Philadelphia intersections will fund 23 safety-improvement projects in 18 municipalities across the state, Gov. Wolf announced Monday. The biggest chunk of money - $2.8 million - will go to five projects in Philadelphia, including $1 million for safety improvements at 30 to 50 "crash locations," according to a news release. Michael Carroll, acting commissioner of the Philadelphia Streets Department, said the city would have three years in which to identify the sites and use the Automated Red Light Enforcement grant.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2016 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Staff Writer
It adds up: Pennsylvania paid more than $600 million in fees to hundreds of private firms managing money for its state and school pension systems in 2015. Plus more in submanager fees, and profits that hedge funds and real estate managers pocket at liquidation of their investments, which the pension systems don't count. The fees that the state pension systems reported total more than the investment profits the funds collected last year, a tough one for investors. Maybe it's not surprising, then, that professional money managers so often split these fees with the guides who promise to help them land government investment contracts.
NEWS
May 5, 2016 | By George Bezanis, $util.encode.html($!item.bycredit)
AS A CAREER educator dedicated to improving our schools and ensuring that children in our poorest communities get the chance to succeed, I applaud Mayor Kenney for kicking off his term in office by seeking to expand educational opportunities for Philadelphia's most vulnerable children. I have serious concerns, however, that the mayor's plan to expand universal pre-kindergarten to every Philadelphia child will not achieve what it is designed to do: putting tens of thousands of our poorest children on the path to academic success.
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Max Weiss and Wendell Pritchett
Over the past five years, the funding crisis in the School District of Philadelphia has become well known to everyone in the region, as well as many people across the country. As a result of cuts in state and federal funding during the summer of 2011, the district faced a deficit in excess of $600 million for fiscal 2012. In preparing the fiscal 2013 and 2014 budgets, the School District faced gaps in excess of $300 million. While the district has secured funding (mostly from the city)
NEWS
May 4, 2016 | By Karen Langley and Angela Couloumbis, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The next state budget is not due for two months, but after last year's gridlock, legislators on Monday took a step toward preventing a repeat of the stalemate that kept school funding bottled up for months. Returning after a two-week recess, members of the House Education Committee approved a bill that would keep school funds flowing if a budget is not enacted by Aug. 15 - six weeks after the next fiscal year starts July 1. The governor's office and Republican legislative leaders were not admitting the need for such an insurance policy.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
Twenty-four Senate Democrats are asking their colleagues in Congress to help schools pay for the testing of lead levels in drinking water, calling it an investment to ensure the health and safety of the nation's children. The move is the result of the drinking-water crisis in Flint, Mich., which helped shine a light on a loophole in federal law that exempts many schools from having to test their water for lead contamination. After revelations that the drinking water in nearly half of Newark's public schools had elevated levels of lead, New Jersey lawmakers have proposed requiring every school in the state to test its water for the contaminant.
NEWS
May 1, 2016
On April 13, the Support Center for Child Advocates hosted its annual benefit and auction, celebrating 39 years of pro bono legal and social-service advocacy for abused and neglected children. More than 800 people gathered in the Crystal Tea Room at Wanamaker. Guests enjoyed an open bar, hor d'oeuvres, a silent auction, an awards program, and an exciting live auction. This year's 2016 Lois G. Forer Child Advocacy Award winners were Penny and Robert Fox, philanthropists and founders of the James Fox Foundation and Robert A. Fox Leadership Program, which supports education for hundreds of youth and teaches the importance of community service and civic involvement.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Claudia Vargas, Staff Writer
The city's Board of Pensions and Retirement has hired the son of longtime Register of Wills Ron Donatucci to be the chief investment officer of the city's beleaguered pension fund. Michael Donatucci, 30, is currently an investment strategist at SEI Institutional Group, a Montgomery County-based asset management firm. He has been with the firm for eight years. He will be paid $175,000 in his new position. Rob Dubow, pension board chairman and the city's finance director, said Donatucci had "precisely the level of experience and expertise necessary" for the job. Dubow said Donatucci's family connections did not influence the board's decision.
NEWS
April 29, 2016
CAMPAIGNING in the city last week, Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders criticized Mayor Kenney's sugary-drink tax proposal as "regressive," saying the burden would unfairly fall on poor people, who on average drink more sugared soda and other soft drinks. Sanders meant it was regressive in the economic sense. But, there is evidence the tax may be "progressive" in a public health sense by lowering the rate of diabetes and obesity, which also on average afflict more poor people.
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