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NEWS
July 2, 2013 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
IS HALF A LOAF enough to save school programs and thousands of education jobs in Philadelphia? State lawmakers and Gov. Corbett cobbled together a patchwork bailout for the Philadelphia school district that's less than half of its $304 million budget gap for the coming school year, which doesn't fully address its long-term problems. Here's what they did do as darkness fell on Harrisburg:   Q. How much money will Philly receive after Gov. Corbett's rescue package? A. The rescue package - including funding in the state budget signed shortly after 10 p.m. by Corbett and other actions - totals more than $140 million for next year.
NEWS
May 28, 2015
WE KNEW we were being naïve when we imagined that City Council would come back from the last week's campaigning and roll up its sleeves to address the hard issues of school funding in Philadelphia. Any one of the issues would have been fine: how to come up with the $105 million the district requested of the city, how to fill the $85 million deficit, the erosion of essentials like school nurses and books, or maybe the discouraging disparity - 33 percent, according to a recent study - between funding for rich districts vs. poor ones like ours.
NEWS
April 12, 2011 | By Andrew Taylor, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - A close look at the government shutdown-dodging agreement to cut federal spending by more than $38 billion reveals that lawmakers significantly eased the fiscal pain by pruning money left over from previous years, using accounting sleight of hand, and going after programs President Obama had targeted anyway. Such moves permitted Obama to save favorite programs - Pell grants for poor college students, health research, and "Race to the Top" aid for public schools, among others - from Republican knives.
NEWS
September 18, 2011 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Barbara Trent has been a teacher for 42 years, including 23 spent corralling cute kindergartners at Cook-Wissahickon Elementary. To see her in action, a lone adult surrounded by scamps, is to be rendered instantly exhausted. Especially this fall, as schools like Cook contend with Gov. Corbett's budget cuts and the institutional chaos of the Philadelphia School District. "I had 17 students last year," Trent said wistfully last week when I popped into her remarkably controlled classroom.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Burr Van Atta, Inquirer Staff Writer
Panic threatened for a time last week when members of the Northeast Philadelphia Cultural Council learned that no money had been allocated in the state's capital budget for work on the Furey Ellis Building, one of the newer structures on the grounds of the now-closed Philadelphia State Hospital. Their concerns were heightened when spokesmen for the Department of General Services, the state agency responsible for the hospital's buildings and grounds, reported that funding for Furey Ellis had been removed from the budget.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
AS A union representative for SEPTA's locomotive engineers, I applaud the Daily News editorial support for full dedicated funding for SEPTA. Although dedicated funding enjoys strong bipartisan support from legislators in this five-county region, yes votes will also be necessary from those who are not normally sympathetic to the needs of Philadelphia or SEPTA. In order to win their support, several pervasive SEPTA "myths" need to be aggressively countered with the facts. SEPTA is not a bloated bureaucracy that would misspend any dedicated funding increases.
NEWS
June 3, 1990 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer Inquirer Staff Writer Robert Zausner contributed to this report
The debate was heated, the stakes high, the question agonizingly familiar: Would SEPTA raise fares? When a majority of the SEPTA board voted yes recently, the decision was predicated on an expectation that next year, things would be different. Next year, state politicians would set aside a predictable and secure funding base for SEPTA, so it could avoid the further decay of its system or the frustrating budget dilemmas of this spring. Only one problem with that expectation: Some of the state's leading politicians have yet to promise they will try to make it come true.
NEWS
June 14, 1987 | By Chris Hand, Special to The Inquirer
If the local business community comes through with funding, the more than 3,000 school-age children in Voorhees Township may get a new playground. The Voorhees Township Committee last Monday agreed to provide the Osage Parent Faculty group with $5,000 toward the purchase of the playground, which would be next door to the Osage Elementary School on Burnt Mill Road. The design of the playground would be similar to one constructed at the Clara Barton school in Cherry Hill last year, according Linda Nichols, a member of the parent-teacher group.
SPORTS
January 27, 1998 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Under the threat of losing their baseball team, Allegheny County officials are close to completing a plan to provide public funding for new stadiums for the Pittsburgh Pirates and Steelers. The plan, which could be announced as early as next week, would not only provide a local contribution for the two stadium-starved teams; it would trigger a promise by Gov. Ridge to kick in the state's portion of the funding and provide a blueprint to a solution for the Phillies and Eagles. Only the state's contribution would be left to complete the financing mix of local, state and private sources that a governor's task force has said would be necessary to fund stadium construction in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
October 6, 2015 | BY RANDY LOBASSO AND BOB PREVIDI
LAST MONTH, Councilwoman Cindy Bass put out a statement highlighting the traffic violence faced by the people in her district. Three of the 10 most dangerous intersections for crashes in the city - Broad and Olney, Chelten and Wayne Avenues, Broad and Lehigh - are all in her 8th District and, in light of that, Bass thinks the city should do something about it. So, she's supporting a much-needed shot in the arm for Philadelphia's aging, crumbling street...
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 21, 2016
ISSUE | ZIKA VIRUS Health over politics Congress's inability to fund desperately needed Zika testing and research shows that ideological politics has become much more important to the GOP than dealing with critical health needs of U.S. citizens ("For Menendez, the Zika fear is real," Thursday). Though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it is nearly out of Zika funding, Republicans insist on excluding Planned Parenthood from funding for contraception, which can prevent transmission of the virus.
NEWS
September 21, 2016 | By Robert Moran, Staff Writer
Walking on crutches, Officer Ed Miller was in good spirits as he arrived Monday night at Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 5 in Northeast Philadelphia. Less than 72 hours earlier, he was wounded in a gun battle with a man who had targeted police in a shooting rampage in West Philadelphia. On Friday night, a bullet ripped through Miller's right hip and ankle, and grazed his right elbow. The shooter, 25-year-old Nicholas Glenn, was killed in a hail of police gunfire. Miller, 56, a member of the University of Pennsylvania police force, called it "a night I'd like to forget, but it worked to our advantage.
NEWS
September 20, 2016
ISSUE | CANCER Increased research funding urgently needed Each of us is just one degree away from cancer. We all know someone who has battled this dreadful disease, and that is why I traveled to Washington last week - to represent cancer survivors and patients in my congressional district. I joined nearly 700 American Cancer Society volunteers from across the country - all decked out in light-blue ACS polo shirts - to urge Congress to increase research funding for the National Cancer Institute by $680 million.
NEWS
September 20, 2016
ISSUE | CLEAN ENERGY Tax credits help fund solar, wind power The distinction between fossil-fuel and renewable-energy incentives in a commentary (" That subsidy exclusively for Big Oil? No such thing ," Sept. 7) fell flat. Wind and solar industries in this country are primarily incentivized through tax credits, not government grants or loans. Tax credits - no matter what the energy source - leave more money in the private sector for investment, and for good reason, as more American-produced energy takes us closer to energy independence.
NEWS
September 16, 2016
By Valerie A. Arkoosh In our hyperpartisan times, there is one issue that just about everyone agrees upon: the need for government to invest in roads, bridges, and infrastructure. This is an urgent problem in Pennsylvania - in 2014, the commonwealth's bridges received a D-plus rating from the American Society of Civil Engineers. Montgomery County, where I serve as one of three county commissioners, owns 133 bridges. Four years ago, as a result of years of neglect and deferred maintenance by prior administrations, nearly half of those bridges were deemed structurally deficient.
NEWS
September 16, 2016 | By Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - A state effort to target funding to lagging school districts did not reduce student achievement and per-student spending disparities, a recent study says. Under the plan, which is no longer in effect, the state sent additional money to school districts that were spending less than what a formula determined was adequate for a district with its number of students and level of poverty, among other factors. The planned six-year program ended after three years. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Georgia State University concluded in a National Tax Journal study published earlier this month that the payments Pennsylvania sent to these districts did not reduce the gaps in spending or student achievement that separate wealthy and poorer districts.
NEWS
September 15, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
Some Pennsylvania schools have cutting-edge facilities. Others have no textbooks. The state's education-funding system is so fundamentally flawed that a judicial remedy is needed, parents, school districts, and advocacy groups told the state's highest court Tuesday. Leaving school-funding decisions to Pennsylvania's legislature has resulted in gross inequalities, said Brad Elias, a lawyer for the plaintiffs. "This is unconscionable," Elias said. "It's so far out of the range of reasonableness.
NEWS
September 14, 2016
The Philadelphia Education Fund has received a $3 million federal grant to help prepare students at five city high schools for college. The money awarded to the fund's College Access Program will be used over the five years to create college-going cultures at the schools and to help 1,200 students apply for college, obtain financial aid and attend college after they complete high school. The five high schools that will share in the grant are Kensington CAPA, Olney Charter, John Bartram, Robeson and Roxborough.
NEWS
September 14, 2016 | By Kristen A. Graham, Staff Writer
With trumpets and speeches, a drum line and song, students, teachers, politicians and others rallied Monday for education funding in advance of an important Pennsylvania Supreme Court hearing on the matter. The high court will hear arguments Tuesday in a lawsuit charging that the state has abdicated its responsibility to adequately fund school districts across the commonwealth. Parents, including two from Philadelphia, and districts including the William Penn system in Delaware County sued the state in 2014.
NEWS
September 13, 2016 | By Jason Nark, Staff Writer
As a retired judge, Lawrence Wood thought he'd seen all the angles, every lie a desperate man could cook up to save himself. Then a letter arrived at Wood's West Chester office, about eight years ago, from a prisoner who'd passed the hat among inmates to help raise money to save his cellmate. It seemed everyone who'd heard about James Kelly's story became obsessed with proving he isn't a murderer. "I told James as long as I had a breath left in my body that I'd try to get him out of jail," Wood said.
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