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NEWS
June 14, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia could be forced to eliminate at least $50 million in spending on youth programs because of a change in state funding patterns, city officials said yesterday. Most of the imperiled programs are part of the city Department of Human Services' Division of Community-Based Prevention Services. They include after-school initiatives, truancy programs, and some programs of the nonprofit Philadelphia Safe and Sound. "This really could be devastating," said Cheryl Ransom-Garner, commissioner of the Department of Human Services.
NEWS
February 22, 1989 | By S.A. Paolantonio, Inquirer Staff Writer
The executive director of a Hispanic community agency in Hudson County charged yesterday that Assembly Speaker Chuck Hardwick's office refused to sponsor state funding for the organization because its board is supporting U.S. Rep. Jim Courter for governor - a charge that Hardwick's campaign emphatically denied. Marita Borzaga, executive director of the Latin American Community Agency in West New York, N.J., said that Hardwick's director of member services, Donna Frangakis, told her on Thursday that Assembly Republicans would not post the legislative bill necessary for the agency's funding.
NEWS
August 7, 1987 | By Chris Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Gov. Kean rejected a final effort to save a state Labor Department office in Camden yesterday by vetoing a $1.2 million spending proposal that would have kept the office open. In rejecting the appropriation, Kean said the money would not address the long-term funding problem of keeping the office open. The office makes Social Security disability determinations for the federal government. Kean's action was expected. The Labor Department closed the Camden office June 30 and transferred its operations to another disability determinations office in Newark.
NEWS
June 23, 2005 | By Michael Currie Schaffer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street joined in a boisterous protest outside City Hall yesterday in the hope of pushing Gov. Rendell to fix a funding gap that has imperiled programs for 23,300 city children. The rally came a day before the two men were set to meet about the gap, and as the city's commissioner of human services was spending a second consecutive day in Harrisburg working on the issue. "A message has to be sent to anybody that has anything to do with the budget of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania," Street told a crowd of about 300. "Our children deserve better.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | BY LINDA BRUNN
The City of Philadelphia has sued the state of Pennsylvania to free funds for child care. Supporting this action, I am nonetheless concerned that Philadelphia's children may suffer while this suit works its way through the legal system. We must not allow an argument over funding responsibility to jeopardize funding. The children's needs remain immediate. Furthermore, properly funded and staffed services can do work to protect children in need. For example, my social work agency, Episcopal Community Services (ECS)
NEWS
August 4, 2005 | By Bonnie L. Cook INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Efforts to restore the historic Black Horse Inn and improve a section of Bethlehem Pike in Springfield Township are getting underway in earnest. It will be announced today that $150,000 in federal funds has been appropriated to restore the 18th-century inn, and $800,000 more in federal funding has been allocated to spruce up a section of Bethlehem Pike where the inn is located, according to figures provided by an aide to U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz, (D., Pa.). The staffer said the $150,000 grant will have to be matched by local fund-raising efforts, from the public, corporations, foundations and government bodies at the township, state and federal level.
NEWS
September 12, 2001 | By Kristen A. Graham INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Saying the state Department of Education has badly shortchanged Gloucester City schools, officials from the district began arguing a case for increased funding before a judge here yesterday. "It would be a farce if it wasn't a tragedy for the kids and parents of Gloucester City," lawyer Richard Shapiro told Judge Bruce R. Campbell in his administrative-law offices. As one of the 33 special-needs or Abbott school districts, so named for the landmark Abbott v. Burke school-funding decision, Gloucester City receives most of its funding from the state.
NEWS
September 17, 1995 | By Gilbert M. Gaul and Susan Q. Stranahan, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Congress returned early this month to put the finishing touches on a historic spending bill that reflects the promise of conservative Republicans to pare down government. Although final details of the 1996 budget are unresolved, few federal programs have been spared. Even science and technology initiatives - long a bipartisan favorite in Washington - face the budget ax under current GOP proposals. The House has slashed funding for a variety of research and development programs that have burgeoned in recent years.
NEWS
May 25, 1990 | By Patrisia Gonzales, Inquirer Staff Writer
A group of poor Latinas dropped in on the "Senor" governor yesterday - without an appointment - to have a chat about the endangered funding for three Hispanic women's centers that serve the low-income Latinas from North and South Jersey. There they were crammed inside Gov. Florio's waiting room - great- grandmothers who have learned to read and write in English or Spanish, welfare mothers who want "to be somebody," professional women from other countries who came to the land of bills and money only to end up working in lamp factories or as maids because they did not speak English.
NEWS
June 27, 1991 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is an economic triple threat that could slash up to 5,700 jobs in Bucks County. In the spring, three of the county's major employers - USX Corp., 3M and the Warminster Naval Air Development Center - announced they were closing, moving or curtailing operations. Although many of the layoffs could be a few years down the road, workers at the Bucks County Assistance Office in Bristol Township said they had seen a drastic rise in the number of people applying for aid in recent months.
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