CollectionsFunding
IN THE NEWS

Funding

NEWS
June 26, 2015
SINCE HE WAS SWORN in as governor in January, my husband and I have been crisscrossing the state, visiting schools, meeting with teachers and administrators, and talking with students in the classroom. We have seen the same thing in school after school and classroom after classroom: motivated students and dedicated teachers who simply don't have the resources they need to succeed. At King Elementary School in Lancaster, I heard about how some textbooks in the library are more than 30 years old because they don't have the funds available to replace them with updated versions.
NEWS
June 24, 2015
ISSUE | SCHOOL FUNDING All fall down on job Although I share the view that it's City Council's responsibility to provide adequate and consistent funding for Philadelphia schools, more attention should be given to the state legislature's role in creating the problems the School District faces ("Indecent proposal," June 17). Since the late 1990s, the legislature has ducked its responsibility for adequately funding the pension fund it created and manages. To correct this oversight, the legislature has passed the responsibility for addressing pension fund obligations to local districts - which in turn have had to dramatically increase taxes and/or reduce operating costs and programs.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - New Jersey Democrats on Monday unveiled the broad contours of the budget they will submit to Gov. Christie, saying they would make a full contribution to the underfunded pension system by raising taxes on businesses and the state's highest earners. Christie, a Republican who says he will announce whether he is running for president by the end of the month, has vowed not to raise taxes. The state constitution requires the Legislature to pass, and the governor to sign, a balanced budget by next Tuesday.
NEWS
June 24, 2015 | By Erin McCarthy, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials stood in front of a verdant baseball diamond Monday morning in Camden. The field used to be a landfill where folks from across the city dumped their trash, including chemicals and medical waste. "As I look out behind me, I remember what it once was," U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross (D., N.J) said. But Norcross joined EPA officials not to tout a mission accomplished, but instead to focus on an area behind the ball field and playground, a part of the former landfill site that is not yet ready for development.
NEWS
June 23, 2015
HOW BROKEN is Pennsylvania's school funding formula? So broken that the Legislature actually decided to do something about it. It created a bipartisan commission to study the current formula and come up with a new, more workable and fairer one. The Basic Education Funding Commission released its report and recommendations last week and it contains a lot of good news for the Philadelphia School District. Instead of the hodgepodge formula the state uses now to dole out aid, it calls for a new one that begins with true enrollment.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Jonathan Tamari, Inquirer Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - Along with the pomp and pride that comes with hosting the 2016 Democratic National Convention, there's an underside for Philadelphia: begging Congress for money. Since 9/11, federal lawmakers have set aside $100 million every four years to help cover security costs for the cities hosting the national party conventions, but only after overcoming resistance from those who balk at laying out taxpayer money for lavish political rallies. The wrangling in those fights provides a window into how pet causes creep onto the federal tab - often as footnotes in larger and more pressing bills.
NEWS
June 23, 2015 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anne Marie Jones is bracing herself to tell a story of drug addiction, prostitution, and recovery to a city preparing for a pope. The 48-year-old mother of three clawed her way out of a life on the streets with the help of Dawn's Place, a residential treatment program for women involved in human trafficking. "Here, I found immediate peace and safety," said Jones, sitting at a table at the program's headquarters, where she is now a peer mentor. Jones is scheduled to share her story on Monday at a news conference to announce the formation of a charitable fund aimed at ensuring that the visit of Pope Francis, scheduled for Sept.
NEWS
June 23, 2015
CAN THE DNA of a school system by altered permanently? For decades, the accepted wisdom in the nature v. nurture debate held that our brains are fully formed at birth, that our DNA cannot be changed. But recent research has shown that trauma, especially in early childhood, can effect changes not only in the DNA of the victim but in that of subsequent generations. Can the DNA of a school system be harmed irreparably? So many factors have contributed to the unaddressed trauma of Philadelphia's students: the expansion of charter schools, some closing without warning due to mismanagement or outright fraud; the yearly standardized testing - even in early grades - used to label students and to justify the permanent closing of neighborhood schools; the sense of abandonment felt when entire faculties are replaced for hasty turnarounds or transformations.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
TRENTON - Amid a power struggle between two of South Jersey's biggest hospital systems, state lawmakers are crafting a budget that could include $2.5 million for Cooper University Hospital to provide emergency medical services in Camden, people familiar with the matter said Thursday. The City of Newark also would receive $2.5 million to provide EMS services there as part of the resolution. The Assembly and Senate would have to vote to include the funding in the next fiscal year's budget, which lawmakers must pass by June 30. Separate legislation is advancing in both houses of the Democratic-controlled Legislature that would enable Cooper to take over paramedic services in Camden, now provided by Marlton-based Virtua Health System at no cost to taxpayers.
NEWS
June 20, 2015 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
A state commission Thursday called for a sweeping overhaul of Pennsylvania's education-funding formula, aimed at closing the nation's biggest spending gap between richer and poorer districts. The formula recommended by the Basic Education Funding Commission, a bipartisan task force of lawmakers and key administration officials, would add more weight to factors such as poverty, non-English-speaking pupils, and charter payments, and would be a boon to cash-poor districts across the state.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|