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Funding

NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Councilman Kenyatta Johnson and challenger Ori Feibush faced off in a one-hour debate Thursday that touched on campaign finance, school funding, and development. The debate, at times spirited but cordial throughout, drew a standing-room-only crowd of more than 300 people to the Greenfield School's auditorium. Feibush, a Point Breeze real estate developer, said he's running because the Second Council District has become "a tale of two cities. " "I have some incredibly boring but incredibly important policy ideas to share with you," he said.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Four city schools have won thousands of dollars to spur turnarounds, pay for training, and create supports to get students back on track. The grants were announced Wednesday by the Philadelphia School Partnership. Saints John Neumann and Maria Goretti Catholic High School is getting $150,000 to plan its overhaul. Roxborough High will get $145,000 for a turnaround; Wissahickon Charter will receive $56,625 for training; and the Workshop School, a project-based public high school in West Philadelphia, is to get $23,200 for technology and an academic-intervention program.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joel Greenberg once donated $1 million to a struggling after-school music program in West Philadelphia, having read about it in the newspaper. The Main Line financial trader didn't bother to return a reporter's call asking why he did so. Greenberg is like that, those who know him say - passionate in his desire to help others, particularly children, and uninterested in self-promotion. "He does not want to be front and center," said Ina B. Lipman, executive director of the Children's Scholarship Fund, another cause that has benefited from Greenberg's largesse.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | Chris Hepp and Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writers
Democratic mayoral candidate Nelson A. Diaz is staking his campaign on city schools. Abolish the School Reform Commission, Diaz says. Establish a local school board and universal prekindergarten. Connect needy students with social services. "I want to be responsible for the school system," Diaz said in an interview Tuesday with the Inquirer Editorial Board. Diaz fleshed out his ideas with a new education policy paper that described a plan for raising an additional $215 million for the Philadelphia School District short-term, and up to $500 million long term.
REAL_ESTATE
March 16, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
A carriage house on North 35th Street is home to one of Mantua's more successful businessmen. Rick Young is a real estate developer who also teaches entrepreneurship at a local elementary school, hoping to inspire the next Ford or Facebook. Now 50, Young has a success story that started when he was just 19. While recording hits such as "We Could Be Lovers" for his record label, the Beat Factory, he worked at a Domino's pizza franchise at the University of Pennsylvania campus.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
LAWYERS representing six Pennsylvania school districts, parents and education advocates argued yesterday that state courts must hold the Legislature accountable for providing adequate funding for public education. The arguments before a panel of Commonwealth Court judges in Harrisburg were to determine whether the lawsuit should move forward. The plaintiffs, which also include seven parents from Philadelphia and the NAACP, claim the state has not provided sufficient funding for most students to pass mandatory graduation exams.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's system of education funding is broken, and the courts must force lawmakers to make it right, attorneys for school districts, parents, and organizations that have sued the commonwealth told a panel of judges here Wednesday. The suit - brought by school systems, including the William Penn district in Delaware County, and parents, including two from the Philadelphia School District - argues that Pennsylvania's education funding system is "irrational and inequitable.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Following the 2013 Center City building collapse that killed six people and injured 13, committees tasked by City Council and the Nutter administration to look into how to reform the Department of Licenses and Inspections concluded that the regulatory agency was underfunded. The department is budgeted at $28.8 million and 353 positions, 20 of which are unfilled. On Thursday, Mayor Nutter responded by calling for an extra $10.8 million for L&I, spread over three years. The first $5.5 million, to be allocated in 2016, would go toward hiring 43 employees, most of them building inspectors, and for new technology.
NEWS
March 6, 2015 | Solomon Leach, Daily News Staff Writer
MAYORAL CANDIDATE state Sen. Anthony Hardy Williams announced an education plan yesterday that he said would provide an extra $200 million for the city's ailing public-school system and reduce competition between traditional schools and charters. Williams, who's vying for the Democratic nomination, said he would take a three-tiered approach to provide more funding for the district: dedicating a higher portion of the city's property taxes to schools, reinstituting partial charter reimbursement and requesting an additional $25 million from the Philadelphia School Partnership, on top of an original $25 million offer for charter-school expansion.
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