CollectionsFunding
IN THE NEWS

Funding

NEWS
April 25, 2016 | By Martha Woodall, Staff Writer
Farah Jimenez, a Philadelphia School Reform Commission member and a former head of the People's Emergency Center, has been named president and CEO of the Philadelphia Education Fund. The independent nonprofit, which champions quality public education in the city and provides scholarships to help students attend college, is scheduled to make the announcement Monday. "We are excited that Farah will be driving Philadelphia Education Fund's continued mission of delivering exceptional outcomes for all Philadelphia students by developing great teachers, and building paths to college and career success," David Baker, chairman of the fund's board of directors, said in a statement.
NEWS
April 24, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
More than $2.6 million was awarded Wednesday to 284 arts and cultural organizations around the city by the Philadelphia Cultural Fund, about the same number as last year. Of those, 20 are receiving their first grants, fund officials said. Since its founding in 1991, the fund has distributed $40 million in unrestricted operating funds to hundreds of groups, large and small. The fund also announced that the Georgia E. Gregory Interdenominational School of Music is winner of the Councilman David Cohen Award, a noncash award recognizing an arts organization for its economic and social justice work.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
ISSUE | EDUCATION Restore Pa. funds to poorest schools Last week, the Pennsylvania Senate and House passed House Bill 1589, which would use a new formula to distribute a small increase in basic education funding for this school year. The action came without a restoration of funds to the school districts that bore the brunt of cuts under Gov. Tom Corbett. This ensures that the state will continue to have the largest funding gap between affluent and poor districts in the country.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Samantha Quinones bought kale for the first time this week - and ate it raw in a salad mixed with some spinach. Chalk it up to a class on food and nutrition that the 25-year-old single mother of two boys is taking at Congreso de Latinos Unidos in North Philadelphia. Quinones, who lives in the Mayfair section of Northeast Philadelphia, said the class, sponsored by the food-service giant Aramark and the American Heart Association, is making a big difference to her. "I'm more aware of what I buy at the grocery store," Quinones said.
BUSINESS
April 20, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, STAFF WRITER
Toll Bros. Inc. said Monday that its Gibraltar Capital and Asset Management subsidiary had created a venture with a "large institutional investor" to provide builders and developers with land banking and joint-venture capital. The venture will finance builders' and developers' acquisition and development of land and home sites, and "pursue other complementary opportunistic investment strategies," the Horsham-based luxury-home builder said. The venture, to be managed by Gibraltar, will have a total of $400 million of funding commitments, with 75 percent from the institutional investor and 25 percent from Toll Bros., the builder said.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Former tennis pro Andre Agassi's charter-school investment fund is poised to turn a $1 million profit when it sells a North Philadelphia classroom building this week to the charter operator that has leased it for five years. The sale to KIPP Philadelphia Charter School is one of the first by Agassi's partnership with the California-based financier Bobby Turner since they set out in 2011 to deliver attractive returns to investors with a country-spanning portfolio of charter-school properties.
NEWS
April 18, 2016 | By Maria Panaritis, Staff Writer
Things should have been easy after Lower Merion Township announced plans a decade ago for a redevelopment of downtown Ardmore, a Main Line town with its own Amtrak and SEPTA train stop. The township picked a private developer. He planned to spend millions to rebuild a puny, aging train station and surround it with a multistory complex of luxury residences, parking, and shops. The state agreed to kick in up to $15 million. But what transpired instead is a big-money saga now before the Pennsylvania Supreme Court that focuses on a highly political grant pool controlled by the governor and state lawmakers.
NEWS
April 17, 2016 | By Susan Snyder, Staff Writer
Dickinson College is preparing to launch a major fund-raising campaign, but its current president, Nancy A. Roseman, won't be raising the funds. Roseman, who arrived at Dickinson in 2013 as the first female leader in the college's long history, said she would resign, effective June 30. "It's an eight-year marathon," Roseman, 57, said of the upcoming campaign. "You have to have a consuming appetite to take that on. I just recognize in myself that I didn't have the appetite for that eight-year marathon.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Kathy Boccella and Angela Couloumbis, STAFF WRITERS
When the Centennial School District embarked on a $140 million building spree in the mid-2000s, with three new elementary schools and major high school renovations, officials failed to account for just one thing. They didn't expect that state government would keep finding ways to renege, or at least stall, on its promise to help districts pay down construction debts through its aid program known as PlanCon. That looked to be the case again this year, when the belatedly approved state budget didn't include money to make the expected PlanCon payments.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|