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Funding

NEWS
December 15, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
The William Penn Foundation has decided to provide short-term funding for Dance USA/Philadelphia, the service organization whose grant application was unexpectedly denied by the foundation last month after many years of support. The grant denial sent shock waves through the local dance community, which relied on the organization, commonly known as Dance/UP, for a wide variety of services - from an e-newsletter, packed with grant-deadline information, to a robust program of subsidized performance venues for the region's burgeoning number of troupes and choreographers.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A CITY COUNCIL bill that threatened funding for the Philadelphia School District and angered education advocates will not be voted on today, its author said. Councilman Bobby Henon's legislation, which would exclude manufacturers from paying the city's Use and Occupancy Tax, was scheduled for a final vote today after being held for more than a year. If passed, the legislation would have cut about $6 million annually from the beleaguered district, but Henon said last night that he would not call the bill up for a vote.
NEWS
December 12, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO, Daily News Staff Writer difilid@phillynews.com, 215-854-5934
JOYCE CRAIG, who became the first female firefighter to die on duty in Philadelphia when she got trapped in a basement fire and perished early Tuesday, will be laid to rest Saturday morning. Well-wishers will have several opportunities to pay their respects: *  Viewings are scheduled at Batchelor Brothers Funeral Services, 7112 N. Broad St., from 6 to 9 p.m. tomorrow and again from 8 to 10 a.m. Saturday. * A funeral service is set for 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, also at Batchelor Brothers.
NEWS
December 10, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
The board of supervisors in rural Franconia Township revealed Monday that for five years, the town improperly used restricted funds to cover up an unbalanced budget. The Montgomery County township will have to pay back - with interest - more than $1.3 million worth of bond issues, open-space funds, and other money misused for operating expenses from 2009 to 2013. Supervisors Chairman Grey Godshall said the budgets were prepared and executed by the former township manager, who resigned in May. The reason for his departure has not been disclosed, but he received six months' severance from the township, according to records published by the Souderton Independent.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Melanie Burney, Inquirer Staff Writer
The message on the billboard ("Save St. Paul School") outside the St. Paul School in Burlington City has become a rallying cry for a race against time. With the clock ticking, the school faces an uphill battle that will decide whether it opens next school year. The 144-year-old parish school in Burlington County has only about six weeks to raise $250,000 or be forced to close for the 2015-16 school year. "No one wants to see this place go," said principal William Robbins. "We're not going to let go. " The elementary school, which has educated generations of families, has embarked on an emotional appeal to the community.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Waves of dismay are rolling through the region's dance community in the wake of an abrupt decision by the William Penn Foundation to cease funding Dance/UP, a branch of Washington-based Dance/USA and the sole organization serving the entire community. The foundation, which provided the funding in 2006 to launch Dance/UP and has supported it ever since, gave no notice that it would not renew that support, said dance officials, nor did it offer to finance a transition period for Dance/UP (formerly called Dance USA/Philadelphia)
BUSINESS
December 1, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
There are a couple of reasons the pension funds that pay retired teachers, police, elected officials, and other public servants have become more expensive for taxpayers - eating up $1 of every $6 in Philadelphia's city budget, for example. It's easy to blame the exotic, sometimes politically connected, investments in unprofitable projects and secretive far-off funds that the pensions' trustees - many of them political appointments - have too often approved. But it's probably more costly that politicians years ago fattened pension benefits but didn't set aside enough money to pay for them along the way. And they still don't.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Chinese investors have begun signing up to spend $500,000 each to help pay for a long-awaited connection between the Pennsylvania Turnpike and I-95. In exchange, the investors hope to get permanent residency in the United States for themselves and their families. Agents for the novel financing plan have been pitching the proposal in China since September, touting the project's financial stability and showcasing photos of Gov. Corbett and Turnpike Commission officials breaking ground for the construction in Bucks County.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The $134 million corporate meeting center rising at Harrah's Resort Atlantic City is supposed to represent the city's less casino-centric future. But a lawsuit filed this week also gave it a role in the high-stakes battle between Caesars Entertainment Corp. creditors, owed about $25 billion, and the Las Vegas firm's private-equity backers over who will get paid from Caesars' insufficient resources. The lawsuit, filed in Delaware Chancery Court on Tuesday by a bank representing senior lenders owed $1.25 billion, called efforts to deal with Caesars' debt load "a case of unimaginably brazen corporate looting and abuse.
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