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Funding

NEWS
June 2, 2014 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
  HARRISBURG - Elected officials have plenty of words to describe the coming state budget debate, none of them good. Some call it bleak. Others call it agonizing - or just plain bad. "Expect a lot of street theater," said one, noting that this is an election year. On Monday, Gov. Corbett and the legislature head into the thick of budget season. Looming are a July 1 deadline and the fiscal reality that state revenue collections are not matching projected expenditures.
NEWS
May 30, 2014 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Treasury Department's chief auditor is reviewing whether it violated the state's pay-to-play restrictions when it invested $15 million with a venture-capital firm tied to a Massachusetts gubernatorial candidate who had donated to the New Jersey Republican State Committee months earlier. The review was disclosed as New Jersey's State Investment Council met Wednesday to consider new "alternative investments" for the state's $76.76 billion pension fund. Charles Baker, an executive-in-residence at General Catalyst Partners, who is vying for the GOP nomination in Massachusetts' governor's race, contributed $10,000 to the New Jersey GOP in May 2011.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
WITH THE Philadelphia School District inching closer to massive layoffs for the second straight year, officials returned to City Hall yesterday to plead their case for additional funding. At the request of City Council, district officials were in Council chambers to answer questions regarding the $216 million the district says is needed to keep schools at current "inadequate" levels. The district is asking the city for an extra $195 million, including $120 million from the extension of the sales-tax hike and an additional $75 million, possibly from a cigarette tax. Superintendent William Hite said the clock is ticking because, under state law, the district would have to send out layoff notices to employees by June 30. Even if the employees were called back, he said, the district would incur costs it cannot recoup.
NEWS
May 23, 2014 | BY DANA DiFILIPPO & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
EVERY TIME Marcella Burney gets a call from Andrew Jackson Elementary School, she panics. That's because three of her children attend Jackson, on 12th Street near Federal in South Philadelphia, including a son who has asthma and a daughter who carries an epinephrine injector because of severe allergies. "It can be dangerous for kids out on the street, and now we got to worry about our kids in the school, too?" Burney said. "This is very dangerous. It scares me every time I have to leave my kids here.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone visiting the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts hoping to see both of its Edward Hopper paintings will be disappointed. The academy sold Hopper's East Wind Over Weehawken (1934) in December for $40.5 million to raise funds for other art. Only his Apartment Houses (1923) remains. A trip to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary on City Avenue to view its six Thomas Eakins oils will also disappoint. In March, the seminary announced the portraits will be sold to fund renovations.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
SEVENTH-GRADER Angela Beqiri's math class does not have textbooks. Terrilyn McCormick's child sat in a classroom with more than 40 students to begin the school year due to a staffing shortage. Fishtown resident Danya Lingle's son was bullied and assaulted at an elementary school with no support staff to come to his aid. Those three were among dozens of concerned parents, students, educators and advocates who testified before City Council yesterday, urging members to provide the Philadelphia School District with additional funding to avoid more than 1,000 layoffs.
NEWS
May 9, 2014 | By Clark Mindock, Inquirer Staff Writer
UPPER DARBY The dirt road that leads to an empty library in Sinon, Tanzania, is a lot different than the streets that lead to Stonehurst Hills Elementary School in Upper Darby. The library in Sinon requires a guard post, and the street is lined with tropical trees and an occasional closet-size storefront that serves as a grocery. The streets near Stonehurst Hills feature small front yards with children's toys scattered about and American flags waving in the breeze. In March, the students at Stonehurst Hills, 90 percent of whom qualify for a special lunch program, hoped to raise $260 for that library on the other side of the world.
NEWS
May 8, 2014 | By Allison Steele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton will headline a fund-raiser for Marjorie Margolies next week in New York City, Margolies' campaign spokesman said Tuesday, providing a potential boost in the final days of her campaign. Margolies, one of four Democrats seeking Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz's 13th District seat in Northeast Philadelphia and southern Montgomery County, is the mother-in-law of Chelsea Clinton, daughter of Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton. Bill Clinton appeared at a Philadelphia fund-raiser for Margolies last month, but Hillary Clinton has until now avoided public involvement in the campaign.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
ONCE A STAUNCH critic of Philadelphia School District spending, former City Councilman Bill Green returned to City Hall yesterday to advocate for millions in additional funding to prevent more than 1,000 layoffs in the district. Green, the recently appointed chairman of the School Reform Commission, was joined by Superintendent William Hite and district officials in discussing the district's proposed $2.8 billion budget, which requests $440 million in new funding from the city and state along with labor concessions.
NEWS
May 7, 2014 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
Making a case for a massive infusion of new funding, Philadelphia School District officials told City Council on Monday that it had an obligation to do more. "If we cannot - or will not - invest in children and their futures, then we have already decided our own: a future that institutionalizes inequity in public education," said Superintendent William R. Hite Jr. "These cuts are testing our schools in ways that range from inadequate and unfair to immoral and unconscionable. " Hite and School Reform Commission Chairman Bill Green said that without $216 million in new funding, they would have to increase class sizes to up to 41 students, lay off 1,000 employees including teachers, and cancel union contracts.
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