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Fungus

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NEWS
November 20, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I've had a fungus infection of the large toes for at least 14 years. All efforts, topical and internal, have failed to kill it. My doctor says he can only slow the infection down, but cannot cure it. Any advice? A: Try griseofulvin (Fulvicin), a prescription oral anti-fungus remedy. You would have to take it for several months to eradicate the yeast, particularly in the nailbed. As an alternative, buy herbal La-Pacho tea (in health food stores or supermarkets), steep it and soak your feet in it twice a day. Q: What cause nocturnal leg cramps, and what can be done for them?
NEWS
April 19, 1989 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Continuing its fascination with official state stuff, a legislative committee yesterday approved as the Pennsylvania vegetable something that isn't a vegetable. The mushroom, that umbrellalike morsel particularly indigenous to Chester County, won passage by a 20-3 vote of the House Agriculture and Rural Affairs Committee despite the words of Noah Webster and vociferous opponents. "There's some question as to whether it is a vegetable. Most people view it as a fungus," complained Rep. Ruth C. Rudy (D., Centre)
FOOD
September 29, 1993 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings, Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: About 10 years ago, we built on to our kitchen. A few years later, black spots began appearing in one section of the floor tile in this addition. I tried everything to get rid of the spots and finally poured straight bleach on them. It seemed to stop spreading, but where the black dots once were some places filled in to where it's almost solid black. I call it a fungus, for lack of a better word. I'd like to get new flooring, but I am afraid it will do the same thing.
SPORTS
August 6, 1987 | By Joe Juliano, Inquirer Staff Writer
This is the week that the PGA of America has waited for since the 1983 Ryder Cup matches here. It's the chance for the association that bills itself as the "World's Largest Working Sports Organization" to host its own championship at its home course. So the 69th PGA Championship finally makes it to the PGA National Golf Club for the opening round today, but no one wants to talk about the length of the course, or the wiry rough, or which golfers will do well here. Instead, the talk at this year's fourth and final major is about the fungus that almost wiped out the greens a little over a month ago and left them with bare spots, the intensely hot weather, the daily threat of severe thunderstorms and even the alligators in some of the course's water hazards.
NEWS
April 28, 2011
A botanist in Philadelphia is likin' this special honor. A newly discovered species of lichen, a type of fungus, has been named for Alfred "Ernie" Schuyler, emeritus curator of botany at the Academy of Natural Sciences and a world expert on rare plants. The newly named Vezdaea schuyleriana is barely visible and so rare that it is only known to exist on a single boulder in Central Pennsylvania. That doesn't matter to Schuyler. He says he's honored that researcher James Lendemer named the tiny fungus after him. - AP  
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Ringworm of the scalp is a kids' health problem that might make a parent wish their child just had a case of head lice. The last major outbreak of the ringworm fungus was among schoolchildren in the 1940s and '50s. But ringworm has returned with a vengeance, in a '90s variety that is not only more difficult to detect, but requires more rigorous treatment to eradicate. "This problem is difficult to detect, but parents need to be aware of it," said Dr. Paul Honig, Children's Hospital dermatologist.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | By Walter F. Naedele, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It's called shotgun fungus. It's black gunk and, when it decides to get nasty and propagate, it shoots out more black gunk. It splatters on houses and leaves a stain that can't be washed off. And it's driving folks crazy. Shotgun fungus - Sphaerobolus stellatus - grows on mulch just like the equally despicable but relatively harmless yellow slime - Physarum polycephalum - called dog barf fungus. In this cool, damp East Coast summer, shotgun, dog barf and all kinds of fungi are rampant - like slime from an alien planet, if you happen to have an especially feverish imagination.
NEWS
February 10, 1994 | By Mark Jaffe, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The antidote to the threats and woes of hazardous wastes - from PCBs to DDT to TNT - may be a common woodland fungus. In the last few months, white rot, which has been decomposing fallen trees in the forest for ages, has become one of the most promising biological tools yet for dealing with toxic wastes. Recent field tests by the federal Environmental Protection Agency found the organism to be effective for cleaning tainted soil, and two toxic-cleanup companies already have purchased licenses to use white rot commercially.
NEWS
January 23, 2009 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whatever is killing the bats of New England appears to have arrived in Pennsylvania. And New Jersey officials are checking out reports that it might be there, too. Yesterday, the Pennsylvania Game Commission confirmed that bats had tested positive for the same fungus found in New England bats that have been dying by the tens of thousands during the last two winters. Everyone agrees that the finding could have profound effects on the bat population here. One of the many mysteries is whether the fungus causes the deaths, now referred to as "white-nose syndrome," or is a symptom.
NEWS
September 12, 1995 | By Allie Shah, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Fungus is not a pretty thing. But it does have a reason for being. That's what Montgomery County Parks naturalist Wendy Hoffman set out to demonstrate Sunday when she led about a dozen nature lovers on a hike through Green Lane Reservoir Park. On the expedition, Hoffman pointed out different kinds of fungus growing on logs, tree trunks and leaves while explaining the importance of an organism normally associated with moldy bread and athlete's foot. "It seems yucky, but they have to attach themselves to living things in order to survive," she said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2016
Plant some brassicas. This means the cabbage family, not fancy underwear: cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, collards, and bok choi from transplants; turnips, rutabagas, and radishes from seeds. All these crops love cold soil and cool temperatures. They are, in turn, loved by certain bugs, and we'll talk about each of them in season. Right now, the offenders are aphids - the soft-bodied gray-blue blobs sucking the juices out of the nooks and crannies of your plants. If you find any ladybugs lurking elsewhere in the garden, pick them up gently and drop them off to eat at the aphid smorgasbord.
NEWS
January 1, 2016 | By Justine McDaniel, Staff Writer
At the stroke of midnight Thursday, a 500-pound mushroom will fall from the Pennsylvania sky. So will a jumbo strawberry, an 85-pound Peeps chick, and a giant, edible hunk of bologna. Of course, as 2015 turns into 2016, that iconic ball in Times Square will drop as usual. And other spots will celebrate their own quirky drops - a peach for Georgia, cheese for Wisconsin. But by at least one count - the one touted by Pennsylvania officials - more objects are lowered or raised in the Keystone State to count down the arrival of the new year than in any other.
REAL_ESTATE
August 2, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
Grease may not be the word, after all, as Joe Ponessa, emeritus professor of housing, indoor environment, and health at Rutgers Cooperative Extension, sees it. Ponessa was responding to a recent column in which a reader reported what looked like "light grease stains on a portion of vinyl siding in the rear of the house. " The professor says: "If the 'grease stains' on siding are not slippery but in the form of small, hard black dots, they are most likely spores from artillery fungus.
NEWS
April 22, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They have voracious appetites. Each can devour more than 1,000 insects an hour, up to its entire body weight in a single night. They eat pests that damage farm crops and gobble up mosquitoes that can infect animals and humans with the West Nile virus. But cave and mine-dwelling bats are now themselves under attack by Geomyces destructans , a fungus causing white-nose syndrome. The disease has killed millions of bats across at least 25 states, including New Jersey and Pennsylvania, federal and state officials say. Some local populations - the most common species is little brown bats - have been reduced by 70 percent to 95 percent, and many caves and mines have been posted and even gated to prevent humans from disturbing or contaminating the places where they hibernate, called hibernacula.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was a typically cold winter day when Greg Turner, a wildlife biologist with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, unlocked the gate at the historic Durham Mine in upper Bucks County and stepped into the darkness. He expected things to be bad. And they were. The long-shuttered iron ore mine - an important site for bats - typically had about 8,000 of the mammals hibernating every winter. But in 2009, biologists discovered that white-nose syndrome, a disease that has killed millions of bats throughout the Northeast, had come to Durham Mine.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer farrs@phillynews.com, 215-854-4225
AN UPPER DARBY man lured a 12-year-old boy into his house, where he covered the child's feet with athlete's-foot spray, tickled them and then examined the boy as if he were a doctor, according to police. When Paul Simon Jamrozik, 63, was done, he made the boy promise to bring his friends along the next time so he could examine them, too, said Upper Darby Police Superintendent Michael Chitwood. Instead, the boy told his dad, who called police. Jamrozik was charged with indecent assault, corruption of minors, unlawful restraint and luring.
NEWS
December 18, 2012 | By Rick Wills, PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW
PITTSBURGH - More than 99 percent of Pennsylvania's bats have died from white-nose syndrome, prompting state and federal authorities to consider listing several species as endangered. The state's timber, oil, and gas industries fear giving bats protected status would hurt business and lead to job loss. "I'm not sure that it can get much worse than what's already happened in Pennsylvania. The state has had more losses of bats than any other state in the country," said Katie Gillis, a biologist for Bat Conservation International in Austin, Texas.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2012 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Wharton School teaches a lot about finance, less about fungus. Graham Phillips grew up in Philadelphia, collected several degrees at the University of Pennsylvania, including from Wharton, and started his professional life with a Wall Street firm. But Phillips grew plants indoors as a child and developed an entrepreneurial outlook as an adult. So after time in New York, Boston and Los Angeles, in July he moved his wife and two children to a 100-acre farm formerly owned by his grandparents in New Hope.
NEWS
December 27, 2011
This is the story of Quorn. If you've never heard of it, check Whole Foods, Wegmans, or other grocers' freezers. The story begins in the 1960s. British scientists, worried that population growth would lead to global famine, searched for novel food sources. Sawdust and coal didn't pan out, but dirt did. A Bucking- hamshire soil mold was found to be a good - albeit microscopic - source of protein, according to Quorn's website. The discoverers figured out how to grow the fungus in fermenters, extract the protein, heat-treat it, mix it with an egg-based binder, and make it look and taste like meat.
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