IN THE NEWS

Fur

LIVING
April 11, 1994 | By Roy H. Campbell, INQUIRER FASHION WRITER
You can tell who's who in the hierarchy of U.S. fashion by the company they keep at their shows. Oscar de la Renta and Bill Blass, longtime masters of the game, between them gathered all the elite doyennes of New York's social swirl, including Ivana Trump, Betsy Bloomingdale, Judy Peabody, Nan Kemper, opera singer Jessye Norman and Barbara Walters. Fittingly, the fall '94 offerings by Blass and de la Renta were the kind of beautiful, elegant and colorful clothes that the perfect ladies would wear on their endless rounds of charity and social functions.
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THE FUR'S STILL FLYING With the cold-weather season almost here, it's time to see what's doing in the fur furor. Despite protests by animal-rights activists, total national fur sales ($1.9 billion) have remained constant since 1986, Glamour magazine reports. But fur prices have fallen, sales of the fabric used to make fake fur are way up, and designers are split on whether to offer real fur, the magazine reports. CHEW ON THIS If you're trying to quit smoking by chewing nicotine gum, don't drink coffee or colas at the same time.
NEWS
January 31, 2005
LOU PELUSO (letters, Jan. 25) seems perplexed by people who continue to wear fur. Well, Lou, it's quite simple. It's the only part of the animal that isn't edible. If some chef out there can find some way to cook the fur a certain way, and make it as delicious as the rest of the animal, we will stop wearing it and just eat it as well. But until then, man will continue to hunt animals, kill them, add fire, munch them down, then slap the toasty warm fur on our carnivore backs for the long, cold walk back to our caves.
NEWS
April 7, 1999 | Inquirer photographs by Emmanuel Lozano
Jennifer Farnum of Norristown, the owner and operator of Cleos Salon on Wheels, clips the fur of Reggie, a wheaten terrier, in her van. After the clipping, Farnum was to give Reggie a bath, fluff his hair dry, trim his fur again, and clip his nails. Farnum leads Reggie to the van from his house in Lafayette Hill. For dogs, Farnum charges from $40 to $150, depending on size. For cats, she charges $40 to $60. Brie, a Maltese, gets a bath. Farnum started her business in November.
NEWS
March 20, 1998 | The Philadelphia Inquirer / RON CORTES
Not really dead and not really naked, volunteers for PETA, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals, stage a "Wouldn't Be Caught Dead in Fur" rally at Independence Mall. Playing possum yesterday were models Yahques Ricketts, Haliman Naim and Khia Nelson.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
WINTER HAS arrived, and the weather has brought out some cool coats. I'm seeing puffy parkas, long wool overcoats, colorful ski jackets and warm fur collars on fashionable Philly men and women. Bundling up in style is always the way go.     Email: Bigrube@streetgazing.com On Twitter: @BigRubeHarley Blog: streetgazing.com  
NEWS
February 10, 2012 | Associated Press
JERSEY SHORE, Pa. - A Central Pennsylvania couple found a very unusual critter in their backyard - a purple squirrel. Percy Emert said he and his wife, Connie, have cagelike traps in their yard to keep squirrels away from bird feeders. Percy Emert then releases the squirrels into the woods. On Sunday, he recalled, "my wife said, 'You're not going to believe it, but I saw a purple squirrel in the yard.' So I put out a trap with a couple of peanuts inside. " Before long, the squirrel came back and found itself trapped.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | By Jill Gerston, Inquirer Staff Writer
Amid increasingly vocal protests of animal-rights activists, the fur industry seems to have adopted a new motto: "If you've got it, don't flaunt it. " Instead of opulent, silky-looking, long-haired styles, last week's Seventh Avenue fur shows brought forth a parade of subdued designs that downplayed the "furriness" of luxury pelts. Minks were sheared and dyed so they resembled colorful velvet plush rather than fur, and pelts such as sable and fisher were used as linings inside cloth coats.
NEWS
August 16, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
In June, the Philadelphia Zoo announced the births of a jaguar and two snow leopards. Two months later, their genders are finally known. They're all boys. Soon the cubs should make their public debuts. The jaguar cub, the first one born at the zoo's First Niagara Big Cat Falls, just got the name Lucha, which means "fight" in Spanish. He might even be on view by the end of the week, said Tammy Schmidt, curator of carnivores. He's already been exploring the outdoor exhibit area, but the viewing window has been blocked off, so he can get familiar with those surrounding before getting used to gawking and pointing humans.
NEWS
May 9, 1991 | By Edward Ohlbaum, Special to The Inquirer
Anybody can catch fish with a spinning reel, the way fly fishermen tell it. But give up the modern technology, they say, and fishing becomes a more exciting, more evenly matched contest. A select few fishing enthusiasts forgo state-of-the-art tackle and use the more primitive gear of the fly fisherman. An even smaller minority forgo the store-bought flies and make their own. "It's more of a challenge," said James Hamilton of Buckingham Township, one of several fly-fishing hobbyists enrolled in an eight-week fly-tying course that begins Wednesday at the Weisel Youth Hostel on Richlandtown Road in Quakertown.
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