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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1990 | By Anita Myette, Inquirer Staff Writer
The bucolic village of Chester Springs is the setting of the 12th annual Yellow Springs Antiques Show this weekend. Nearly 50 dealers will spread their wares among four 18th- and 19th-century buildings in the Historic Yellow Springs complex in the Chester County village. Period and country furniture and furnishings will be spotlighted, but there'll be plenty of other objects and periods represented at the annual fund-raising event. A preview reception will take place tonight from 7 to 10, at a cost of $35. Reservations are requested.
NEWS
February 22, 1987 | By Dan Meyers, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
What price the seat of power - and other accoutrements - in Pennsylvania? It depends on who does the sitting, and where. The chairs, couches, clocks, credenzas, loveseats, lamps, sofas, blinds, bookcases, drapes, refurbished marble fireplaces, refinished fluted mahogany columns and other niceties with which state politicians surround themselves cost taxpayers at least $600,000 a year. And the price is about to go up substantially. In the new addition to the Capitol, due to open this summer, taxpayers will lay out more than $3.7 million to furnish legislative and secretarial offices and close to $10 million for all furnishings, according to figures provided by the state General Services Department, which does the buying.
LIVING
August 2, 1996 | By Marilynn Marter, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With the start of the school year approaching, it's time for a new freshman class to make the inevitable break - the move from home to a college dorm or an off-campus apartment. For many, the days of free room and board will be passing into memory. What they get in return, as young adults, is a relatively free hand in the decor and furnishings of their new personal space. Within a budget, of course. And depending on how much is earned or is coming from Mom and Dad. Before the bags are packed, before the computer and sound system are loaded in the car, the student should take a close look at what lies ahead . . . what is needed and what it may cost.
LIVING
April 17, 1998 | By Denise Cowie, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This year, the Philadelphia furniture show has become officially what it has really been since it was launched three years ago - the Philadelphia Furniture & Furnishings Show. For the first time, furnishings - table lamps and bowls, candlesticks, clocks and stained-glass screens - are sharing billing with furniture - the studio-crafted desks, chairs, tables and beds. Why tinker with success? Accuracy and audience, says Josh Markel, a founder and codirector of this show of one-of-a-kind and handmade objects, which opens at the Convention Center this morning for a three-day run. "We've always been about one-third furnishings, and there's only slightly more this year," he says.
LIVING
November 15, 2002 | By Diane Goldsmith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The armoire with the rustic Alice-in-Wonderland look would be distinctive enough even without the number 5 artistically carved into its door. What was that 5 all about? "It's going to Rod Brind'Amour," Kristen Kreider-Ebert, co-owner of a new home-furnishings store on South Street, said as she stood inside a truck loaded with pieces for the hockey star's North Carolina home. The 5 refers to the "five-hole," the opening between a goalie's legs through which players try to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When most people think of extended-stay hotels (if they think of them at all), they might envision a cheaply furnished room in a desolate location - cold comfort for bleary business travelers and depressed divorcées. But, this underserved niche has received an extreme makeover in recent years, powered in large part by Philadelphia-based Korman Communities and its luxurious AKA chain. Now, a former Korman executive has developed a new take on the concept: Roost Apartment Hotel, a boutique-hotel-meets-Airbnb vision.
NEWS
April 21, 1995 | by Earni Young, Daily News Staff Writer
A wealth of hand-crafted treasures for the home and office will be on display this weekend in the country's largest public showing of studio furnishings at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The event is designed to make the work of furniture makers and artisans, whose work is normally restricted to galleries and interior-design studios, more accessible to the public, said Bob Ingram, a Philadelphia furniture maker and a show organizer. "We've felt as if we needed to give something back to the profession that has treated us so well," Ingram said.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Gilpin Dorman, 80, the former curator of Independence Hall and Independence National Historical Park, died last Saturday at his home in the Southwark section of Philadelphia after a long illness. Mr. Dorman was a recognized expert in 18th-century American decorative arts whose passion for detail resulted in what experts consider to be some of the most authentic restorations of colonial American interiors. He joined the curatorial staff at Independence National Historical Park in 1960 and remained there as curator until his retirement in 1983.
NEWS
September 28, 1998 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Everything that goes around eventually comes around. And few things in life are more cyclical than fashion driven by wealth. As the drapes slowly are drawn on this century, America's new rich are seeking out the antique European furnishings that so captivated their wealthy counterparts as the 19th century came to a close. "A return to opulence in home decor is stimulating a demand for hand-carved European furniture and bronzes," said Leigh Infield, a publicist who represents dealers in opulent furnishings.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
With the residential real estate market on the mend and more first-time buyers in the mix, it is time to think about those little cosmetic changes new homeowners are into. In this case, painting. Experts say that one of the very best times to do interior painting is just before moving into a new home. Here are six reasons, according to Debbie Zimmer, paint and color expert for the Paint Quality Institute: 1. It's easy now. Interior painting is simple and not at all physically demanding when you can move freely within a room.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 25, 2015 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Today I'm reporting from the front gate of suburbia. As well as the Frontgate. We begin when I wanted to buy a new chair for outside, because I like to read or work in the sun and I have only two chairs. I know what you're thinking. One person for two chairs, what's the problem? There are five problems, and they all happen to be dogs. Often when I come outside with my book or my laptop, the dogs are already occupying both chairs. If I move them off one chair so I can sit down, the five of them spend all day fighting over the second chair.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
When most people think of extended-stay hotels (if they think of them at all), they might envision a cheaply furnished room in a desolate location - cold comfort for bleary business travelers and depressed divorcées. But, this underserved niche has received an extreme makeover in recent years, powered in large part by Philadelphia-based Korman Communities and its luxurious AKA chain. Now, a former Korman executive has developed a new take on the concept: Roost Apartment Hotel, a boutique-hotel-meets-Airbnb vision.
REAL_ESTATE
September 28, 2014 | By Diane M. Fiske, For The Inquirer
As you enter Gene and Bonnie Schwartz's 28th-floor condominium at the Murano, first impressions that the building's entrance and halls seem sparse and bare fade away - as intended by developer Peter Shaw, who wanted individual units to outshine the common areas. Instantly, a visitor to the Schwartz home is swept away by a 20-foot span of windows. In one corner, a large brass-and-wood telescope peers out on a view embracing Philadelphia International Airport and Citizens Bank Park and 30th Street Station, and everything between.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2014
THE MAN who once proclaimed "Saturday night's alright for fighting" may soon learn what longtime marrieds already know - the other six days of the week can accommodate a dustup just as well. Elton John and his life partner of 21 years, David Furnish , will set sail on the sea of holy matrimony in May. It's a move prompted by last summer's legalization of same-sex marriage in England. "We don't feel the need to take an extra step legally," Furnish told the Las Vegas Review Journal . "But since we're committed for life, we feel it's really important to take that step, and take advantage of that amazing change in legislation.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
With the residential real estate market on the mend and more first-time buyers in the mix, it is time to think about those little cosmetic changes new homeowners are into. In this case, painting. Experts say that one of the very best times to do interior painting is just before moving into a new home. Here are six reasons, according to Debbie Zimmer, paint and color expert for the Paint Quality Institute: 1. It's easy now. Interior painting is simple and not at all physically demanding when you can move freely within a room.
NEWS
March 2, 2013 | By Anne Gearan and Karen DeYoung, Washington Post
ROME - The Obama administration will provide food and medicine to Syrian rebel fighters, Secretary of State John Kerry said Thursday, announcing a cautious U.S. foray into frontline battlefield support that falls far short of the heavy weapons or high-tech gear the rebels seek. "The stakes are really high, and we can't risk letting this country - in the heart of the Middle East - be destroyed by vicious autocrats or hijacked by the extremists," Kerry said following discussions among a group of Western and Arab nations that are funding, and in some cases arming, the fighters.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2012
OVER THE YEARS, KeVen Parker's Ms. Tootsie brand has come to stand for a whole lot more than fried chicken and macaroni and cheese. It's become about elegant entertaining in a hip, modern vibe. It's Prada sneakers paired with jeans from the Gap; it's an old wooden church pulpit from Parker's great-grandfather's church repurposed into a hostess stand for a restaurant. It's Southern heritage that embraces the past but moves it forward, epitomized by a typical night at Ms. Tootsie's Restaurant Bar Lounge on South Street near 13th, where you can dine on pulled pork sliders and a sweet (but potent)
REAL_ESTATE
August 27, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
The first thing a visitor might notice at the Abo house, set on a quiet, dignified street in Cherry Hill, is its second outdoor mailbox. Shaped like an airplane, it sits suspended on a pole above the other box and says simply "Air Mail. " Nearby, a small "Beer Garden" sign points to bottles planted upside-down in a cluster of shrubs. And then, there's the notice that reads: "In 1897, absolutely nothing happened at this location. " Very soon it becomes very clear that Jane and Marty Abo's home is not your run-of-the-mill suburban retreat.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2012 | By Jura Koncius, Washington Post
We surveyed retailers to come up with two lists of dorm necessities and accessories you might want to consider as you're shopping: the requirements and the electives. Take notes on what's right for your room. The requirements Bedding. A comforter is usually one of the first dorm purchases. "Your bedding will define your style," says Jessica Joyce, spokeswoman for Bed Bath & Beyond. "It's where you study, eat, sleep and hang out, and it reflects your personality. " The Orla Kiely Stem Mini Bed Set is in one of the Irish designer's signature prints and includes a comforter and sham.
NEWS
February 3, 2012 | By Patricia Sheridan, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Greece's economy may be struggling, but one of its iconic motifs is unlocking a treasure trove of design possibilities. The Greek key, a symbol of all that is classical, has conquered the home furnishings industry yet again. At the Fall International Home Furnishings Market in High Point, N.C., the interlocking pattern found its way onto all manner of accessories and furniture. But it wasn't the first time; the look is as old as Mount Olympus and as enduring. "The Greek key motif has always been a popular symbol of status and sophistication.
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