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Furniture

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NEWS
August 22, 1991 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Fine furniture collectors take note: Common Pleas Classic - with its spartan style and costly political veneer - could be headed for investment stardom. There won't be a gala unveiling of the '92 models because the court's mill shop has been shut down. No longer will patronage workers, paid about $500,000 a year in salary and benefits, churn out bookcases and desks, credenzas and tables. Appreciation, therefore, should be the watchword - particularly for taxpayers who were paying for a mill whose supervisors had no idea how much it cost to build furniture for judges and court bureaucrats.
LIVING
October 24, 1997 | By Susan Caba, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everything goes when it comes to furniture these days. But within that umbrella of freedom, some trends were noticeable at the fall furniture market: Bamboo, wicker and rattan were everywhere, at all price ranges. Used in a limited way - as a side table or chair - these popular, casual materials can tone down an otherwise formal room or provide a touch of the tropics. They also can be used as main furniture pieces, to create chic, comfortable rooms. Material mixing was rampant.
NEWS
November 10, 1990 | By Jonathan Storm, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joe L'Erario and Ed Feldman, those two goofs from the neighborhood, are back fixing furniture on Channel 12. The sophomore season of their Furniture on the Mend got off to an abortive start last week when somebody broadcast the fourth episode in place of the first one. Baffled viewers came in on Part 4 of a reupholstering and refinishing project. No, it wasn't just another On the Mend joke. These characters - Feldman grew up in the Northeast, L'Erario in South Philly - will joke about anything, but as craftsmen and furniture experts, they take pains to make their projects understandable.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 1986 | By Al Haas, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the moment, the ornate side chair is occupying center stage in a two-car garage densely furnished with woodworking equipment and thickly carpeted with sawdust and shavings. At the moment, it is also occupying center stage in the lives of Wright Horne and his wife, Virginia Davis, two refugees from the white-collar world who traded regular paychecks for the fiscal ambiguities of custom furniture making. The Bucks County couple isn't yet quite sure what to do about this costly Colonial Williamsburg reproduction of a mid-18th-century Philadelphia piece.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
A group of very rich collectors has pushed prices for 18th-century American furniture to levels that far exceed the prices garnered by furniture made in any other country or any other time. In January in New York, record prices were paid for five forms of Colonial furniture made in Philadelphia. At Christie's on Jan. 20, a small pier table, 35 1/2 inches wide, sold for $4.62 million; a tilt-top tea table for $1.21 million; a side chair for $418,000; a mirror for $242,000, and a fire screen for $66,000.
REAL_ESTATE
April 24, 2011 | By David P. King, For The Inquirer
When Joanne and George Baltaeff were getting married three years ago, they decided that celebrating their new life together called for moving out of old homes and making a new one. The house-hunting began one snowy afternoon, when Joanne made arrangements with a Realtor to see six properties for sale. It ended about 20 minutes later, when she fell in love with the first one, a three-bedroom/three-bath house on a quiet street in Springfield, Delaware County. "I was working a lot, and she was saying we should find a house," George says.
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | By Donald D. Groff FOR THE INQUIRER
Visitors to Chicago this summer will be delighted to find the city indulging again in its tradition of whimsical public art - sidewalks and plazas are being adorned with hundreds of pieces of furniture decorated under the theme "Suite Home Chicago. " More than 150 area artists were enlisted to paint and otherwise embellish life-size fiberglass sofas, easy chairs, ottomans, TVs, and dressers that delight the eye and beckon to children and adults alike. The installations began earlier this month, and the suites along Michigan Avenue's Magnificent Mile of tony shops already are alive with people stopping to consider, admire, crawl on, and pose for photographs with the works.
NEWS
November 8, 1997 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Two auctions will offer fine furniture and fine art with a difference: The furniture is for cozy quarters; the art is "museum quality" acrylic. Generally speaking, acrylics do not have the tony reputation of oils or even water colors, but nine pieces that Ted Wiederseim will be offering next Friday in Lionville will be familiar to readers of Scientific American and other magazines. They are illustrations by Rudolf Freund, a native of Philadelphia who died in 1969. They include an illustration of an archaeopteryx, the Jurassic Era creature important to evolutionists because it was the first known flying reptile to have feathers.
LIVING
September 23, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
A busy week of auctions lies ahead, beginning at 5:30 p.m. today with a special 700-lot estate antiques sale at Briggs that will offer a painting by Milton Avery and some peripatetic pieces of fine furniture, and winding up Thursday with Freeman's fall sale of fine books, manuscripts, maps and prints. The furniture, two elaborately carved bookcases plus a matching drop-front desk, comes from an estate in Hockessin, Del., said Briggs president John Turner. Before that, they had been part of a wall unit, along with a matching mantelpiece and fireplace surround, in a mansion called Miraflores in Claymont, Del. The bookcases and desk were moved to the Hockessin estate in the 1960s, after Miraflores was torn down to make way for Interstate 495. They will be sold as a single lot with a presale estimate of $6,000 to $8,000.
NEWS
October 3, 1987 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
This coming week, you could furnish and decorate your home just by going to auctions. The main source of furniture will be the midweek liquidation by Julius Gordon of about 600 lots of brand-name furniture. Included are china closets, bedroom suites, upholstered furniture and reclining chairs. The site of the 10:30 a.m. Wednesday sale will be Gordon's auxiliary auction space above the Stanley Hardware Store at 232 Market St., adjacent to Gordon's own building at 240 Market St. Exhibition will be from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday and Tuesday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
Thirteen years ago, arthritis began creeping into Jeffry Lohr's spine, bit by bit stiffening it until he was unable to bend over. That would be a life-changer for anyone, but for a master woodworker, it augured the end of the art and craft that had defined him and brought him national renown. The disease progressed to the point that if a nail tumbled from his worktable, he could not pick it up. If there was any saving grace, it was that his hands were spared. So, with medication to keep the pain at bay, the 63-year-old Limerick craftsman has continued creating the traditional furniture that is his signature, as well as free-form pieces that incorporate a tree's edges.
NEWS
July 4, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
"When they pulled up the rug," Deborah Marchand says, "they found this . " We're admiring a glorious terrazzo floor under the rotunda of the Haddonfield Public Library, where a $2.2 million, 15-month restoration, renovation, and repurposing project is nearly complete. The goal, library board president Marchand adds, was "to take what had been a fairly inflexible space and make it more flexible and open and welcoming. " Haddonfield has done all that and then some: A sneak peek last week left me impressed by how seamlessly the old has been freshened up and blended with the new inside the Monticello-esque landmark at Tanner Street and Haddon Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: My boyfriend has hang-ups about being touched in public. If we're walking side-by-side or weaving through crowds, he does not want to hold hands or touch in any way. He likes to be totally "unencumbered. " Part of it seems to be his DNA and part a hang-up about any touch being a form of PDA. I am not clingy, but holding hands to stay close while weaving through a crowd or crossing the street seems reasonable to me. I've given up on ever taking a romantic walk with him, but I'm still upset about the no-touching-while-moving thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: I'm new to apartment life, and I want to know how to choose furniture and definitely area rugs. While I love finding things to furnish my nest, I just can't figure out what to do about the floors. I just have a couple little throw rugs but they slide around. I moved from my parents' into a very open loft-type studio with a wood floor. Please help! - Alison A: Congratulations! I love personalizing a new home. I hope you are enjoying creating your own space. Finding the right furnishings is a lot like shopping for a dress or pair of shoes - there are so many choices for all occasions, formal to casual.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 28, 2016 | By Jennifer Adams
Q: What do I need to do to paint my old bedroom furniture? It's white on top of some very hard green paint - you can scratch the white paint right off the green. My husband and I really like to do little projects ourselves, so can you tell us how to revive this? I don't mind the distressed look, but perhaps that trend is going out the window. - Patricia K A: I love the distressed look, which is still popular. It's a little more work than just a simple painted finish, but it's worth it. I would bet anything you paint over the white will scratch off just as easily.
NEWS
April 9, 2016 | By Natalie Pompilio, For The Inquirer
When Rebecca Kolodziejczak left her full-time job as a hairstylist to become a full-time student at the University of the Arts - specializing in wood crafts - some thought the transition strange. She disagreed. "Manipulating hair is just like manipulating any other natural material. That's all we're doing," said Kolodziejczak, 29, who will graduate with her bachelor's degree this year. "We're worried about balance, composition, aesthetics, style, functionality. All of those things cross over.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2016 | Jennifer Adams
Q: I love reading your advice every week in the newspaper, but I have never seen anyone ask this question. What's the worst furniture arrangement you've ever seen, or, maybe, what's the one thing should I never do in my living room? - J.F. A: The fun part about decorating your house is that there really are no rules - beyond making sure things function, and your home feels just right to you. I prefer to think about it in terms of what you should do rather than what you shouldn't do. If I were to share a pet peeve, I'd have to say it bothers me when the furniture in a living room is too far apart, or when there is no coffee table in front of the sofa.
BUSINESS
March 3, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, Staff Writer
Design Within Reach plans to lease 15,000 square feet at East Market, the mixed-use complex now under construction at Market Street between 11th and 12th Streets, marking the furniture retailer's return to Philadelphia after six years. Plans call for the store to open in early 2017 at the complex's 1100 Market St. building, the retailer and the developer, National Real Estate Development, said in a news release. DWR will be the first non-food retailer to take space at the block-long development, and the first tenant at 1100 Market St. Mom's Organic Market already has been announced as a retail tenant for the adjacent former Family Court building at 34 S. 11th St., which is being renovated as part of the $500 million project.
NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Citing reports of deadly tip-over accidents, Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. said Wednesday that he was preparing to introduce legislation that could require manufacturers to make their furniture more stable. In a letter, the Pennsylvania Democrat also challenged seven of the largest U.S. retailers to take immediate steps to raise awareness of tip-overs, including selling restraints near products that have the potential to topple if not anchored to a wall. "It's kind of hard to comprehend that with all of the advances in technology . . . when we have the means to stop this, that we're not taking the action that we need to take," Casey said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2015
INTERCOURSE, Pa. - With the explosion of online shopping, few can deny the power of the Internet. Not even the Amish and Mennonites, known for being devout to their faith and for shunning technology, electricity, and modern advances that run counter to those beliefs. It raises an intriguing question: Can the Amish and online co-exist? "It is interesting that commerce is forcing even the Amish to adapt to the online retail world," said Barbara Khan, director of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Center at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
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