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Furniture

NEWS
May 1, 1988 | By Susan V. Kraft, Special to The Inquirer
A Malvern interior design firm that has designed everything from office lobbies and model homes to a chapel and a school's gymnasium has expanded its services to include custom design of furniture for the handicapped. In the field of design, Midge Conroy, the owner of the commercial and residential design firm, Impressions, saw a need "to specialize in areas that were not being worked on. " "The handicapped have special needs," but as far as furniture to help serve those needs goes, "there is none available, even through hospitals," Conroy said.
LIVING
September 29, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Kamelot Auctions will go into its third season tomorrow with a sale of more than 500 lots of furniture, statuary, lighting and artwork at its gallery in the 4700 Wissahickon Ave. complex. More than two dozen lots come from the Parisian furniture-maker Jansen, including a consignment from a descendant of the company's founder, Jean-Henri Jansen. Jansen went out of business in the 1970s, Jeff Kamel, head of the auction company (affiliated with Susanin of Chicago), said this week.
LIVING
October 13, 2006 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
On any calendar, John Sollo and David Rago's fall sale of 20th-century arts and furnishings in Lambertville, N.J., is a date worth jotting down for collectors of the contemporary. But the Modern Weekend set for Oct. 21 and 22 adds an incentive for local buyers that turns worthwhile into obligatory: Among the 1,500 lots are more than 20 of furniture, artwork, sketches and photographs by Wharton Esherick. According to the catalog notes, the Esherick property comes from York Fisher Jr., whose family bonded with Esherick in the late 1920s after Helene Fischer, York's grandmother and one of Esherick's great patrons, introduced him to fellow artist Hannah Weil.
NEWS
December 20, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
Stephen Whittlesey makes studio furniture that doesn't function all that well; he may not even intend it to be particularly useful. Yet the sensibility of his pieces is so poetic that they succeed even though they aren't conventionally stylish or beautiful. Whittlesey works exclusively with used wood; old siding and plaster lath are two of his favorite materials. This in itself isn't extraordinary, but Whittlesey carries recycling a step further; he uses the wood exactly as he finds it. He retains the old paint, which often seems to be pink or pea green; he doesn't fill nail or screw holes, and he does not sand rough spots.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | By Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank Brancato, a custom furniture builder whose handcrafted work was sought by luxury hotels and designers along the East Coast, died Saturday. He was 76 and lived in Northeast Philadelphia and in Hollywood, Fla. From 1955 until he sold the firm in 1982, Brancato operated the custom furniture firm bearing his name, first on Chestnut Street and later on 4th Street. "We had the best custom design and manufacturing in the city," said Michael Brancato, his brother, who worked in the business as the contact person with designers and customers.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Eliseo Sostre, 8, slept under a pile of blankets on a recliner parked on a Spring Garden sidewalk shortly after midnight while his mother explained why the family of 11 took over the vacant HUD home on Wallace Street near 18th. About the same time, PHA Executive Director John Paone was explaining that he would not force the family from the illegally occupied, boarded-up house, but neither would he allow them to move their possessions in. "They couldn't find a home through the city, and they declined offers by the city to place them in shelters," Paone said while surrounded by the family's sofas, beds, dressers and a refrigerator.
NEWS
June 25, 1988 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
Next week, several auctions will offer enough country furniture and antiques to outfit a small resort hotel. Also, two nonfurniture sales are of unusual interest, one for its documents, the other for its debut. The documents, which are of particular interest to Philadelphians, will be among the 400 lots of vintage and antique publications that will be offered at 1 p.m. tomorrow by the Kane Antiquarian Auction, 1525 Shenkel Rd., Pottstown. They include an autographed note by Gilbert Stuart, a book with one of the earliest examples of photo illustrations, an early 19th-century scrapbook stuffed with engravings, and watercolors, including a view of Solitude, the house that now serves as the offices of the Philadelphia Zoo. Stuart's note to a Mrs. Potter states that the famous painter was being visited by Little Turtle, a chief of the Miami Indians, whose portrait, since destroyed, was done by Stuart in 1797.
LIVING
July 26, 1987 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
While re-creating the spirit of "Federal Philadelphia, 1785-1825: The Athens of the Western World" for the Philadelphia Museum of Art exhibition that celebrates the bicentennial of the Constitution, museum curator Beatrice Garvan rewrote a chapter of furniture history. Those who would have been inclined to say "Baltimore!" when confronted with a high-style piece of painted Federal furniture can now say "Could be Philadelphia. " Garvan has proved that an important set of painted furniture was made here.
LIVING
February 23, 1986 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Since the astonishing price of $1,045,000 was paid for a Philadelphia pie- crust tea table at Christie's last month, those asociated with the antiques trade have been asking if it can happen again. Although there have been reports, but little hard information, of wealthy collectors offering other wealthy collectors a million dollars in an effort to pry loose a special piece not on the market, the tea-table transaction was the first time that the million-dollar barrier was broken for a piece of American furniture at a public sale.
NEWS
March 8, 2003 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Over the next eight days, auctions will be coming out of the woodwork. A two-day sale this weekend of 20th-century design furniture will feature the tree-slab experiments of George Nakashima. One sale next Saturday will offer period pieces from the days of King Charles II; another will offer a specimen of furniture carving known as "treenware. " This weekend's sale will take place in Lambertville, where the Rago Arts & Auction Center, 333 N. Main St., will offer more than 1,100 lots of furniture and decorations at sessions beginning at noon today and tomorrow.
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