CollectionsFurniture
IN THE NEWS

Furniture

NEWS
February 5, 2016 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Staff Writer
Citing reports of deadly tip-over accidents, Sen. Robert P. Casey Jr. said Wednesday that he was preparing to introduce legislation that could require manufacturers to make their furniture more stable. In a letter, the Pennsylvania Democrat also challenged seven of the largest U.S. retailers to take immediate steps to raise awareness of tip-overs, including selling restraints near products that have the potential to topple if not anchored to a wall. "It's kind of hard to comprehend that with all of the advances in technology . . . when we have the means to stop this, that we're not taking the action that we need to take," Casey said.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2015
INTERCOURSE, Pa. - With the explosion of online shopping, few can deny the power of the Internet. Not even the Amish and Mennonites, known for being devout to their faith and for shunning technology, electricity, and modern advances that run counter to those beliefs. It raises an intriguing question: Can the Amish and online co-exist? "It is interesting that commerce is forcing even the Amish to adapt to the online retail world," said Barbara Khan, director of the Jay H. Baker Retailing Center at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.
NEWS
December 20, 2015
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 14-year-old girl and I have a boy best friend who is also 14. I liked him the moment I met him, which was exactly a year ago. He says it's the same for him. We established that we both liked each other months ago, but we're still only friends. The reason is his parents have a rule that he can't have a girlfriend or go on dates until he's 16. He's the only one I want, but we have to wait until he can ask me out. For now we are best friends, but it's hard not to want to hold his hand and kiss him and stuff like that.
NEWS
December 20, 2015 | By Edith Newhall, For The Inquirer
It's not especially common for two artists with thriving individual careers to work collaboratively, but spouses Chris Johanson and Johanna Jackson realized that the way they live in Los Angeles (and previously in Portland, Ore., and San Francisco) - whether growing vegetables, cooking, building furniture with scavenged wood, or making their own housewares - constituted a perfectly legitimate kind of art. Perhaps even a more socially responsible and personally relevant "art" than the works they had been making on their own, though both continue to exhibit as individual artists.
NEWS
December 17, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
CALL ME STUPID (hey, others have), but I'm not worried about dying from an act of terrorism. Yes, I reacted in horror to the San Bernardino shootings, the Paris attacks, the Mali massacre. Who didn't? But I haven't altered a single thing about the way I conduct my daily life. Have you? I mean, have you made tangible changes in how you live your life, based on fear that you or a loved one could be killed by jihadists? If so, what specifically are you doing and why? The reason I ask is that a Gallup Poll last month reported that Americans now name terrorism as America's No. 1 problem - ahead of the economy, government and guns.
NEWS
October 10, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two months after announcing a recall affecting millions of dressers, federal safety regulators on Thursday urged manufacturers to enact stronger stability standards to limit the risk of children being injured or killed by furniture that topples forward. At a sometimes-heated meeting in Conshohocken, a team of federal engineers came armed with proposed changes they said would improve dresser safety. "We're trying to head off the incidents," said Arthur Lee, an engineer at the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC)
NEWS
October 9, 2015 | By Michael Boren, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kiersten Rickenbach stood out for both her long blond hair and sharp mind at Washington Township High School, where she often spoke of her plans to attend Duke University and become a pediatric oncologist. Nicknamed "Blonde" and "Barbie," she was voted "Most Studious" and "Most Likely to Succeed" by her classmates. In 1995, when she graduated, she was valedictorian. "With Kiersten, there wasn't a doubt in my mind that she was going to become a physician," said Karin Eckert-Carpenter, her guidance counselor, who helped her apply to Duke.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015
Q: My partner and I have been shopping for furniture, and I hope you can answer this question. Is it just us, or is furniture getting bigger all the way around? We have a lot of modern, low furniture, including a platform bed, and a low couch and chairs. We love the sleek midcentury look, but are having a hard time finding new pieces that don't make us feel like little kids - plus, our condo isn't huge. - A. A: It isn't just you. There is an overall trend for larger-scale furniture.
NEWS
September 4, 2015
I HAVE FRIENDS who cannot watch horror movies alone. One in particular keeps every light on in the house and packs her living room with warm bodies before she will even roll the credits on "The Exorcist" (and actually, the credits are the scariest part with that maniacal bells music). I have other friends who love "The Walking Dead" but shield their eyes at some of the gorier parts, which is every part between the commercials. I do not understand the fear that overtakes these people, who are otherwise upstanding, mature members of society.
NEWS
August 21, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
HIGH POINT, N.C. - Dressers that meet the furniture industry's voluntary safety standards still pose a risk of crashing onto children, and efforts by manufacturers to adopt tougher measures have been sluggish and ineffective, a top federal regulator says. Speaking at a meeting on the growing threat of furniture and television tip-overs, Marietta Robinson of the Consumer Product Safety Commission said the current industry standard offers only "minimal stability" for dressers. Some large manufacturers, she said, are failing to meet even that low standard.
« Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|