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NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Auction activity over the next few days will be concentrated in South Jersey with sales including a souvenir statue from the 1939 World's Fair; Asian, modern, and fine arts; a historic glass collection; and a new auction concept, a "tailgate" sale in the Pinelands. The statue is a metal copy of Augusta Savage's The Harp , originally a 16-foot-tall plaster sculpture formally titled Lift Every Voice and Sing , inspired by the composition by James Weldon and Rosamond Johnson. The original was the most popular and photographed work at the fair, and the copy, with a presale estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, will be offered by 21st Century Antiques at an estate sale beginning at 9:30 a.m. Saturday at 599 N. Church St. in Moorestown.
NEWS
August 10, 2012 | By John F. Morrison and Daily News Staff Writer
IT ENDED in tragedy and regret. For more than 40 years, Nate Ben's Reliable was a landmark furniture and appliance store in Center City where generations of Philadelphia and suburban shoppers went for quality products and reliable bargains. Whatever it was you were looking for, you could get it for less at Nate Ben's. And it seemed so sudden when it all fell apart. Owners and employees went to prison; bankruptcy was declared; and old customers were treated to the dismal sight of the once-bustling building that occupied most of the block of 2100 Market St. crumbling and sagging with windows smashed and boards nailed over doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 2012 | By Tim Butt, McClatchy Newspapers
KANSAS CITY, Mo. - We are experiencing a demand today for the designs of midcentury American furniture, when America was in a period of design excellence and innovation, but the question of what to buy has become more confusing to the consumer. Can I buy an original? Should I buy vintage or new? What is the difference between an authentic piece and a reproduction? As a designer, and someone who supports authentic design, I will try to clarify some of the confusion around these questions.
NEWS
July 28, 2012 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
Walter Murta Jr., 83, co-owner of furniture stores in Southwest Philadelphia and Upper Darby, died Wednesday, July 25, of pneumonia at Little Flower Manor, a nursing home in Darby Borough, where he had lived for 31/2 years. He was a 45-year resident of Lansdowne. Born in Philadelphia, Mr. Murta graduated from the former Collingdale High School in 1947 and studied business at what is now Drexel University, his son, Stephen, said. While in high school, Mr. Murta began working part-time for his father, Walter Sr., at McGinity & Murta's Furniture at 54th Street and Chester Avenue.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2012 | By Caroline Tiger, For The Inquirer
To Ben McBrien, carpentry gigs used to be something to supplement a professional surfing career. After graduating from high school, the Manahawkin native didn't go to college. He went to Hawaii. "I moved backward," he says, "through the typical path of a designer. " McBrien learned the mechanics of carpentry from his father, a former home-builder. "I've been making stuff since I was old enough to carry wood," he says. On a surfing trip to California, he tagged along to estate sales with a friend obsessed with vintage modern.
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | By David Iams and FOR THE INQUIRER
In the online catalog for its "town and country" sale Saturday, Kamelot Auctions candidly describes one of the 800 lots to be offered as "bizarre. " While not going to that extreme in their sales descriptions, at least three other auction houses will offer items over the next few days that could be called "distinctive. " Kamelot's explicitly bizarre item is "an antique horn-and-brass dresser, smoke or pen stand," about 11 by 13 inches, with what appears to be a small mirror hung between the two horns.
NEWS
March 25, 2012 | By Lisa Scottoline, Inquirer Columnist
Here's something I do that might be crazy: I rearrange the furniture. Often. Blind people don't stand a chance in my house. And most of the time, neither do I. Rearranging the furniture is one of my favorite bad habits. My most favorite bad habit is eating chocolate cake, and my least favorite bad habit is marrying badly. It all began with an ottoman, which somehow expanded into the Ottoman Empire. Let me explain. I was sitting on my couch in the family room, working on my laptop with the TV on. I went to put my feet up on the coffee table, and my foot knocked over a mug of coffee.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Sarah Wolfe, Associated Press
Bold, dramatic, and invigorating, tangerine tango is dancing its way into home-decor trends in 2012 with a punch of reddish-orange panache. The hue is a vivacious alternative to last year's honeysuckle, and design experts say it's easy to incorporate. Pillows, bedspreads, and tabletop accessories in this high-impact color can add spice to any room. Or add tangerine appliances and personal electronics for an unexpected pop of color, says Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Institute, the research arm of Pantone Inc. of Carlstadt, N.J., which sets color standards for the home and fashion industries.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Christine Bahls, For The Inquirer
Once upon a time, furniture purchases, like marriages, were supposed to last forever. You know what's happened to the latter. As to the former, a growing movement's afoot to breathe new life into tables, chairs, and breakfronts that were once landfill-bound, or destined for eternity beneath a sheet in Aunt Ethel's attic. If cynics think these pieces land in flea markets waiting for the down and out, think again. Jeffrey Cofsky, owner of Consignment Furniture Gallery in Cherry Hill, says his customers have high incomes.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By Samantha Melamed, For The Inquirer
Upholstery is a dying field - or at least that's what everyone always told John Price, a 44-year-old Mayfair resident who has been in the business since graduating from high school. After he lost his job at Old City's Regent Upholstery, where the owner retired last year after more than half a century, he almost started to believe it. So Price was surprised to get a phone call from Portside Arts Center, where students had been clamoring for several months for someone to teach them the not-quite-lost art. "I never thought there was much interest," he said.
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