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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 8, 2015 | William Bender, Daily News Staff Writer
JIM KENNEY. White. Irish Catholic. Mummer. The future voice of black Philadelphia. Strange as it might sound - and look - that's precisely the message that state Rep. Dwight Evans and other African-American political leaders in Northwest Philadelphia sent to voters yesterday when they publicly backed Kenney for mayor. Kenney, 56, won the coveted endorsement at Relish restaurant on Ogontz Avenue, drawing praise not just from Evans, but from City Councilwomen Marian Tasco and Cindy Bass and state Reps.
SPORTS
April 5, 2015 | BY SHAMUS CLANCY, Daily News Staff Writer clancys@phillynews.com
A LIGHT DRIZZLE and clouds covered Citizens Bank Park yesterday afternoon, much the same way Cole Hamels' future with the organization lies in a murky gray area. An iconic playoff hero of years past, Hamels dominated the rumor mill and Twitter feeds all offseason as a trade chip, as the Phillies have moved further from those deep October runs into full-on rebuilding mode. Hamels yesterday discussed where he saw himself pitching on Opening Day during the winter months when talks swirled of him moving to Boston, Chicago, San Diego or another city.
NEWS
April 3, 2015
IF WE Philadelphians have a fault, it's that we put our blinders on when it comes to the rest of the state. That's a mistake. We are the state's largest county, but there are 66 more. We are all in the same boat called the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and our fate locally is linked to the state's. Gov. Wolf understands this. His budget proposal doesn't target one area over another. He wants to create a rising tide for everyone, regardless of whether they live on Venango Street or in Venango County.
SPORTS
April 1, 2015 | BY DAVID MURPHY, Daily News Staff Writer dmurphy@phillynews.com
BRADENTON, Fla. - It was only a year ago that the Phillies seemed oblivious to the reality that they faced. As late as last June, the front office bristled at the notion that it should focus its attention squarely on the future. But as Ruben Amaro Jr. stood outside the visitors' dugout at McKechnie Field yesterday, he left little doubt that his philosophy had changed. "This year is more about our future than our present," the general manager said. "We've said that many times.
NEWS
April 1, 2015 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
  Abington Senior High is in one of the nation's highest achieving school districts. Nearly 86 percent of its last graduating class went on to college. But in the last 15 years, fewer than 2 percent of its graduates chose another path: the military. On Monday, the school welcomed one of its most esteemed alumni, a man who hopes to change that imbalance not just at Abington, but nationwide. "I used to sit right down there," said Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, smiling as nearly 1,000 students and educators welcomed him with a standing ovation.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
SEPTA will not appeal a federal court ruling that the transit authority must accept virulently anti-Muslim advertising on its buses, SEPTA officials said Thursday. In accepting the ruling, SEPTA officials also said they have tightened the agency's advertising standards to legally prohibit such ads in the future. The black-and-white ads proclaim "Jew Hatred: It's in the Quran" and feature a photograph of a 1941 meeting between Hitler and Hajj Amin al-Husseini, a Palestinian Arab nationalist who made radio broadcasts supporting the Nazis.
NEWS
March 28, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
They have been teammates in the past. They will be teammates in the future. Fow now, they are rivals - an ace pitcher and a star hitter for teams that will compete in both the Olympic Conference's American Division and the South Jersey Group 4 sectional tournament. When Cherry Hill East senior Jon Hansen steps to the plate in the first inning of the first game of the Mingo Bay Classic in South Carolina on April 7, he'll likely see Cherokee senior Brian Marconi on the mound. The confrontation will be both good fun between old friends and a renewed battle between fierce competitors.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Feeling optimistic? You've got company. More than two-thirds of Philadelphians recently surveyed said they expect the city to improve over the next five years, while fewer than one in five see worse times ahead. More young people say they plan to stay. In fact, the historically cantankerous denizens of the nation's fifth-most-populous city now report feeling more positive than at any time in the last six years, according to a poll by the Pew Charitable Trusts, which has asked the same question about residents' outlook since 2009.
SPORTS
March 19, 2015 | BY MARK PERNER, Daily News Staff Writer pernerm@phillynews.com
THE SIXERS are a few Miami Heat losses, a few not-so-friendly Los Angeles Laker ping pong balls and an Oklahoma City Thunder winning streak away grabbing four of the first 19 picks in the 2015 NBA draft. Of course, with some twists of fate, they could just end up with their own pick, which could drop as low as sixth as the NBA standings currently dictate. (Three top spots can be displaced.) Either way, the Sixers are going to be looking at the NCAA Tournament not just to see how they do in their collective pools but also to see how some of the talent they've had their eyes on the past few months perform.
NEWS
March 19, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Carol Harrison walks into her mother's nursing-home room, raises the blinds, lets in the morning light. "Hey, Mom, hey, good morning. " The daughter's voice is tender, as if waking a child. She kisses her mother's cheek. Strokes her hair. "Mom, hey, it's Carol Ann. It's Carol Ann. I'm here to see you. " No response. Grace Ward, 90, is under a blanket, in a recliner, eyes closed. She has had Alzheimer's disease for 15 years. For the last five, she hasn't uttered a coherent sentence, or recognized her daughter.
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