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NEWS
July 22, 2013 | By Susan FitzGerald, For The Inquirer
Jaimee Drakewood hurried in from the rain, eager to get to her final appointment at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Ever since her birth 23 years ago, a team of researchers has been tracking every aspect of her development - gauging her progress as an infant, measuring her IQ as a preschooler, even peering into her adolescent brain using an MRI machine. Now, after nearly a quarter century, the federally funded study was ending, and the question the researchers had been asking was answered.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband and I have been together for more than a decade and have two sweet, young children. After months of a nagging feeling and begging my husband to tell me the truth, he finally admitted this weekend that he has visited prostitutes and massage parlors for years. The last year has been a sad, miserable time. He was emotionally retreating out of shame and guilt. The quiet tension has taken a toll on us and our children. He can get therapy to heal his addiction, but it won't be with me by his side as his wife.
NEWS
August 16, 2016
By Ned Rauch-Mannino The National Museum of Industrial History, the original Smithsonian affiliate located on the successfully redeveloped former brownfield that was once Bethlehem Steel, opened its doors this month. Dedicated to recognizing America's industrial heritage, features include the 1876 Centennial collection, on loan from the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History, crowning achievements of Industrial Revolution ingenuity. The first-made, last-produced, oldest-surviving, and longest-running inventions in U.S. history are among the institution's additional 200 artifacts on display.
SPORTS
August 15, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Javien Elliott was giving away six inches and 61 pounds to Carson Wentz when Tampa Bay's fourth-string, undrafted rookie cornerback found himself confronted by the onrushing quarterback early in the fourth quarter of Thursday's exhibition opener. Wentz had momentum on his side as he executed an option bootleg to the left, a lot of momentum, and had already picked up five of the six yards needed for a first down when Elliott realized his coaches would expect him to do something about this.
NEWS
July 31, 2016 | By Lynn Rosen, For The Inquirer
In his fiction, Jay McInerney chronicles New York City life. From the coked-up wannabes he portrayed in his now-classic first novel, Bright Lights, Big City , to the titans of various industries who are now a good three decades older in his new and eighth novel, Bright, Precious Days (which is out on Tuesday), McInerney gives us characters and dialogue that could happen only in Manhattan, and we love him all the better for the critical lens he shines on these very particular island inhabitants.
SPORTS
July 30, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Throughout his week in Las Vegas earlier this month, Jay Wright hustled from coaches meetings to team meals to practices, keeping company with the power people in USA Basketball, and not once did he experience a moment alone with the most powerful of them all. Wright spent those seven days in the desert as an assistant coach with the USA select team, the group of 23 young NBA players charged with preparing the U.S. national men's team for the...
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Cynthia Burton
As Hillary Clinton formally becomes the first woman to win a major-party presidential nomination, I am flooded with gratitude for my mother and my grandmother, the sort of humble women whose shoulders Clinton and so many who have broken barriers stand on. They are women denied opportunities by the conditions of their times, but who nonetheless fought for a better future for their children. At the turn of the last century, my grandmother Margaret Lynch, a first-generation immigrant, attended Hunter School in Manhattan.
NEWS
July 17, 2016
DEAR ABBY: When I was 13 and 14, I sent nude pictures to guys I didn't know over Kik. I am now 15 and interested in a career in education. I have read about educators getting fired for sending pictures. Should I be worried that I will never have a career in education? Or ever get into a good college? - Questioning Teen DEAR QUESTIONING: Sending nude photos at any age, especially if someone is underage, is extremely dangerous to both the sender and recipient, and I hope you will never do it again.
SPORTS
July 12, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO - Dylan Cozens clutched the black bat in his hands like a toothpick and unleashed on a batting-practice fastball. Dozens of scouts watched from the stands Sunday afternoon at Petco Park, where Cozens displayed power to all fields before the annual Futures Game, a showcase for the game's top prospects. His mere presence is arresting; Cozens, a former defensive end, is almost always the largest player on the field at 6-foot-6, 235 pounds. The 22-year-old lefthanded hitter has slugged his way to prominence while playing for double-A Reading, the team with the best record in organized baseball.
SPORTS
July 9, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Who's on first? That's a question Phillies fans have rarely had to ask since Ryan Howard arrived in the middle of the 2005 season and blasted his way to the National League rookie of the year award. Sure, there was that time at the start of the 2012 season when Howard was sidelined by a leg infection after undergoing offseason surgery to repair the torn Achilles tendon that brought the 2011 season to a crumbling conclusion. Charlie Manuel tried to temporarily replace the Big Piece with Ty Wigginton, Laynce Nix, John Mayberry, and Jim Thome, but all were fruitless attempts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend, "Paul," and I have been together for five years. We want to get married, but his mother is Catholic, and she doesn't approve because I am a Native Alaskan, which from her perspective makes me a pagan. Paul hasn't attended church or held any Catholic views for many years, but he won't tell his mother, because he's afraid it would devastate her. She has told me we are living in sin, that our marriage could cause him to be excommunicated, and that if we have children, they'll be bastards who will go to hell.
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