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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Oct. 21, 2015. That means the future - as envisioned in the 1989 film Back to the Future II - is officially here. As predicted, we do indeed have flat-screen TVs, video conferencing, and drones - and, appearing on Philadelphia streets of late, a device vaguely resembling Marty McFly's hoverboard. For now, though, Kevin DiCesare still tends to turn heads while cruising in the Spring Garden Street bike lane during his daily, eight-mile-round-trip commute on a Ninebot One, a device that might best be described as the uncanny love child of a unicycle and a Segway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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SPORTS
February 1, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
About 60 kids clad in red T-shirts formed a line Saturday afternoon inside Maplezone Sports Institute to greet the ace of Phillies past. For two days this weekend, this sprawling complex in Garnet Valley hosted Cole Hamels, who posed for photos with each camper before one of three four-hour pitching clinics. The potential ace of Phillies future - the tallest one in the room - stood nearby. Jason Groome, a possible No. 1 choice in the draft in June, was a coach at Hamels' camp. The lanky lefthander with a powerful fastball from the Jersey Shore trains two days a week at Maplezone.
NEWS
February 1, 2016 | By Scott Sturgis, For The Inquirer
As the Philadelphia Auto Show cruises through the next week, about 250,000 people are expected to stroll among hundreds of offerings at the Convention Center. Some of what you'll get to see includes the 2017 Fiat 124 Spider, the 2017 Jaguar F-Pace, and the 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio. Amid vehicles basking in the bright lights and hoopla surrounding soccer star Carli Lloyd doing kicks at the show, perhaps there's room to reflect on the auto industry's past and look to its future.
NEWS
January 31, 2016 | By Tom Avril, Staff Writer
When David P. Silverman translated mystical writings on the side of a 4,000-year-old Egyptian coffin recently, he discovered a plea to the earth god, Geb. The long-ago writer sought protection for the coffin's inhabitant, a district governor named Ahanakht. But these days, the words could just as easily mean protection from the trembling earth next door. University City is the site of yet another construction project. This time, it's the demolition of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's Penn Tower complex, in order to make way for a new patient pavilion.
NEWS
January 26, 2016 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
Chaka Fattah hit a few familiar notes last week, deriding as "frivolous" and "nonsense" the federal criminal charges that the congressman now faces while running for reelection. There was something new mixed in with that: Fattah put his money where his mouth - and his future and freedom - are. Call it Fattah's big bet. The 11-term congressman, after weighing the tasks of fund-raising for the April 26 Democratic primary and for the legal defense in his trial set to start six days after that, said he decided: "I can't do both.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The state Senate on Wednesday passed a bill that would delay using Keystone Exams as a high school graduation requirement and study whether the proficiency tests should be a graduation requirement at all. The plan, which passed the Senate unanimously, would set the 2018-19 school year as the earliest to make the exams a graduation benchmark. In addition, within six months of the act's becoming law, the Department of Education would be asked to "investigate and develop alternatives" to the tests, according to the bill.
SPORTS
January 18, 2016 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
Since the night of Tuesday, Dec. 29, when the Eagles announced that they had fired Chip Kelly, nothing about them has become so clear as this: When it came to making a bold choice and seeing it through, owner Jeffrey Lurie never put any courage behind his convictions. Lurie likes to speak of the Eagles as a forward-thinking, risk-taking organization, always driving the train, never passengers on it. That self-image led him and Howie Roseman to hire Kelly in 2013, to bet that Kelly's unorthodox thinking about football and training would lead the Eagles to their first Super Bowl victory.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | By Laura McCrystal, Staff Writer
Flanked by vacant lots and rundown buildings, the red marquee of the Centre Theater in downtown Norristown is a prominent local landmark. Even the four-story theater, which once hosted vaudeville acts and Mark Twain, is mostly empty. Now its nonprofit board is attempting to bring new life to the 19th-century building and in the process give a boost to the fortunes of Norristown, the seat of one of Pennsylvania's wealthiest and most populous counties. The prosperity enjoyed by neighboring county seats - West Chester, Media, and Doylestown - has eluded the borough of 34,000, and revitalization efforts are not new. But those involved in the arts in Norristown believe they can help the tired downtown enter a new stage.
NEWS
January 18, 2016 | David Boardman
In the last month, two billionaires in their mid-80s made transactions involving major American newspapers. The two deals speak loudly about the state of journalism these days, and should make us all feel grateful about which of those two billionaires lives here. In one case, the billionaire was a buyer. In December, casino magnate Sheldon Adelson purchased his hometown paper, the Las Vegas Review-Journal, from a corporate chain for $140 million, tens of millions of dollars more than it was worth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 14, 2016 | By Elizabeth Wellington, FASHION WRITER
First Lady Michelle Obama enforced her husband's fiery message of hope for America Tuesday night in the form of a Narciso Rodriguez sheath the designer named marigold. "The design of the dress was very simple, but that shade is always the color of optimism," said Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute. "Even before I heard the president's speech, I got a sense, just from Mrs. Obama, there would be a sense of looking toward the future. " With a wispy long bob, Obama waved and beamed in that pretty yellow dress - in a sea of grays, greens, and unfortunate ornate hats.
SPORTS
January 11, 2016 | By Sam Carchidi, Staff Writer
If Flyers general manager Ron Hextall isn't named the NHL's executive of the year - or at least made an honorary certified public accountant - some people haven't been paying attention. In his 20 months on the job, Hextall has traded the contract of an injured player, Chris Pronger, who will never play again; dealt away seldom-used Vinny Lecavalier; who had two-plus seasons left on a contract that absorbed a $4.5 million annual cap hit; and stockpiled draft picks. In short, Hextall has done an amazing job cleaning up his predecessor's messes.
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