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Future

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NEWS
March 30, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When she found out early in her pregnancy that one of her identical twins would die at birth, Sarah Gray began a five-year journey that culminated last week in Philadelphia. She had to carry the sick baby to term in order to protect his healthy twin. And she also looked into organ and tissue donation. "Instead of thinking of our son as a victim," she said, "I started thinking of him as a contributor to research, to science. " On March 23, 2010, Thomas and Callum Gray were born at Fairfax Hospital in Virginia.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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NEWS
August 24, 2015 | By Jason Laughlin, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a narrow corridor just outside Philadelphia, unused train tracks slowly surrender to rust and rot. Hidden by trees and underbrush from surrounding starter homes and shops, for 200 yards the rails wend through overgrown grass and wildflowers like the exposed vertebrae of ancient serpents. The tracks in Oreland, Montgomery County, are among close to 100 miles of unused railroad rights-of-way in Southeastern Pennsylvania, rail experts estimate, two-thirds of them owned by SEPTA.
NEWS
August 20, 2015 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Rev. Terrence Griffith, pastor of the oldest black Baptist church in Pennsylvania, was sweating in the early-morning heat. Alone in the cavernous sanctuary of First African Baptist Church, he lamented the lack of air-conditioning. Outside, a chain-link fence protected pedestrians from a church wall that he said could collapse at any moment. The church, Griffith said, can no longer handle the burden of its 109-year-old building at 16th and Christian Streets. "I'm not going to preside over the death of a church," he said.
NEWS
August 14, 2015
D EAR ABBY: I'm writing in response to "Not Talking About the Future," whose wife has breast cancer, was told she has only a few years to live and feels sad when her kids talk about their futures. My dad was diagnosed with stage four multiple myeloma, a type of blood cancer, in 2006. He was told that even the most aggressive treatment would buy him only two or three more years. Well, he's now working on year nine. While I must admit that it's been hard at times for me to stay positive about his prognosis, I try not to let it show.
SPORTS
August 5, 2015 | By Mike Sielski, Inquirer Columnist
By 1:30 Monday afternoon, all the Eagles players, except two, had left the practice fields at the NovaCare Complex. The two who remained were linebackers Connor Barwin and Marcus Smith, and they charged toward and slap-boxed with an orange-padded tackling dummy, honing their pass-rush moves. Barwin was the teacher, Smith the student. That was to be expected. Barwin led the Eagles with 141/2 sacks last season. Smith, the Eagles' first-round draft pick last year, played just eight games and 74 snaps.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Although he is only 13, Michael has a career in mind - actually, a few of them. He'd like to be on a professional basketball team, although football would suit him fine, too. He also dreams of becoming a veterinarian. Michael, however, is used to juggling activities. He loves playing basketball with his friends and visiting amusement and water parks. He enjoys listening to rap and gospel music, and watching television. He likes receiving presents, so, of course, his favorite holiday is Christmas.
BUSINESS
August 3, 2015 | By Joel Wee and Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writers
First in an occasional series. Baby boomers, the generation that brought America cable television, middle-class pot smoking, and the two-car garage, are now bringing the nation the jobs of the future. The boomers, as they grow older and more infirm, will need home health aides, personal care aides, registered nurses, and physical therapists - jobs that the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics says will be among the fastest growing in the next seven years. "It's about . . . these aging baby boomers," among other trends, said labor economist Paul Harrington, director of Drexel University's Center for Labor Markets and Policy.
NEWS
July 23, 2015
ISSUE | ARTS ECONOMY Cultural learning Yes, Philadelphia needs more arts jobs to "enrich the lives of all Philadelphians," as an Inquirer editorial noted ("A need for more arts jobs," July 20). And it isn't much of a stretch that many of the artists enriching our lives will get their start in the city's public schools, and that the audiences who fill the galleries and concert halls begin their love of the arts in grade school. That's why continuing to remove the arts from the School District curriculum certainly won't add to the enrichment of our lives.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SOME PEOPLE stumble aimlessly through life, hoping to find purpose before their hourglass runs out of sand. Jasmine Wright wasn't one of them. "She had a promising future, she was definitely going to make a difference," said Wright's former roommate at Penn State University, who spoke with the Daily News last night on condition of anonymity. "It's beyond sad that her future got cut down so early. " At 27, Wright already had traveled the world in relentless pursuit of something simple, pure, noble - helping the less fortunate.
SPORTS
July 15, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
A dozen days. That constituted an offseason for Zack Steffen this summer, home in Downingtown. That many days between returning from a successful stint as the starting American goalkeeper at the Under-20 World Cup in New Zealand and heading off to another continent, to his professional team in Germany. If a keeper from Chester County eventually represents the United States in a World Cup, remember the dues he is paying now. Steffen spent his winter and spring as the reserve goalkeeper on a German Bundesliga team's reserve squad.
SPORTS
July 14, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
J.P. Crawford, the Phillies' top-rated prospect, provided a run-scoring single Sunday in the U.S. team's 10-1 win against the World team in the Futures Game at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. Crawford, who started at shortstop and batted second, finished 1 for 3 and scored a run. The 20-year-old star at double-A Reading also popped out to the catcher and struck out. It was his second consecutive July representing the Phillies in the game. Aaron Nola, the Phillies' top pitching prospect, also represented the club, but did not pitch because of his six-inning start Friday night for triple-A Lehigh Valley.
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