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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 17, 2016
DEAR ABBY: When I was 13 and 14, I sent nude pictures to guys I didn't know over Kik. I am now 15 and interested in a career in education. I have read about educators getting fired for sending pictures. Should I be worried that I will never have a career in education? Or ever get into a good college? - Questioning Teen DEAR QUESTIONING: Sending nude photos at any age, especially if someone is underage, is extremely dangerous to both the sender and recipient, and I hope you will never do it again.
SPORTS
July 12, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
SAN DIEGO - Dylan Cozens clutched the black bat in his hands like a toothpick and unleashed on a batting-practice fastball. Dozens of scouts watched from the stands Sunday afternoon at Petco Park, where Cozens displayed power to all fields before the annual Futures Game, a showcase for the game's top prospects. His mere presence is arresting; Cozens, a former defensive end, is almost always the largest player on the field at 6-foot-6, 235 pounds. The 22-year-old lefthanded hitter has slugged his way to prominence while playing for double-A Reading, the team with the best record in organized baseball.
SPORTS
July 9, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Who's on first? That's a question Phillies fans have rarely had to ask since Ryan Howard arrived in the middle of the 2005 season and blasted his way to the National League rookie of the year award. Sure, there was that time at the start of the 2012 season when Howard was sidelined by a leg infection after undergoing offseason surgery to repair the torn Achilles tendon that brought the 2011 season to a crumbling conclusion. Charlie Manuel tried to temporarily replace the Big Piece with Ty Wigginton, Laynce Nix, John Mayberry, and Jim Thome, but all were fruitless attempts.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My boyfriend, "Paul," and I have been together for five years. We want to get married, but his mother is Catholic, and she doesn't approve because I am a Native Alaskan, which from her perspective makes me a pagan. Paul hasn't attended church or held any Catholic views for many years, but he won't tell his mother, because he's afraid it would devastate her. She has told me we are living in sin, that our marriage could cause him to be excommunicated, and that if we have children, they'll be bastards who will go to hell.
SPORTS
June 24, 2016 | By Bob Cooney, STAFF WRITER
TWO YEARS AGO, Brett Brown helplessly watched as then-general manager Sam Hinkie made the final decisions on the 76ers' two first-round draft picks. With the third overall selection, Hinkie went with injured big man Joel Embiid out of Kansas. Embiid had fractured the navicular bone in his right foot during predraft workouts and it was known he most likely would miss his initial season in the NBA. Seven spots later, Hinkie surprised many with the selection of point guard Elfrid Payton out of Louisiana-Lafayette.
NEWS
June 21, 2016
BEWARE OF anything that has the word "reform" attached to it. A case in point are the bills being passed nearly every day in Harrisburg, now that the icy relationship between Gov. Wolf and the Republican-led legislature has thawed a bit. One is a bill to reform the state's pensions systems for state and school employees. Both funds are suffering from long-range deficit - to the tune of nearly $63 billion. There has been a big push (among Republicans mostly) to do away with the state's current pension system - which bases pension on years served and final salary, multiplying the two to create what is called a defined-benefit pension.
NEWS
June 20, 2016 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Part of the beauty in taking charge of a professional sports franchise is that while the winning clock is certainly ticking, it really isn't that loud for a while. Howie Roseman, who is back in control of the Eagles, never really went away, but his power did while Chip Kelly tried his luck at team building. That means Roseman gets a full reset on his clock now, with lots of time to get things right. Roseman is taking full advantage of that luxury this offseason. He has committed $280 million in future contract guarantees, some of which had to be done sooner rather than later, but some of which didn't.
NEWS
June 19, 2016
DEAR ABBY: I have plans to go to law school in the next two years. I have already taken the entrance exam, and will receive recommendations from two of my college professors. The problem is, my parents are refusing to cosign for my law school loan. Abby, I'm not asking for money; I'm just asking for someone to cosign the loan for me. I plan to pay off the debt myself. I don't want to ask an extended family member for help, because even if they agree, I'd feel horrible if it prevented them from helping their own children with something.
NEWS
June 11, 2016
By James H. Lytle Given the frequent and considered attention to the challenges and prospects of public schooling in Philadelphia, it may help to have a clearer understanding of why the city's district schools are having such difficulty competing with charter schools. Although this is a simplification, it's reasonably straightforward to explain why charter schools have a substantial advantage. Imagine a charter school with 700 students. It receives approximately $10,000 per student each year from a combination of state, federal, and local government allocations; its 100 special-needs students get an additional $10,000 per year, adding $1 million to the school's annual budget of $8 million a year.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
ISSUE | PRE-K Early start is key As a retired educator, I agree with three pediatricians concerning early schooling ("Failure to adequately fund pre-K hurts Pa. children," Wednesday). I am especially pleased that they endorsed state funding of structured pre-K programs such as Head Start and Pre-K Counts. I have observed Head Start classrooms while supervising teachers in training and can testify that they provide enriched, holistic environments for children starting at age 3. Besides school readiness, they provide nutrition, training in good health practices, and parental involvement.
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