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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Oct. 21, 2015. That means the future - as envisioned in the 1989 film Back to the Future II - is officially here. As predicted, we do indeed have flat-screen TVs, video conferencing, and drones - and, appearing on Philadelphia streets of late, a device vaguely resembling Marty McFly's hoverboard. For now, though, Kevin DiCesare still tends to turn heads while cruising in the Spring Garden Street bike lane during his daily, eight-mile-round-trip commute on a Ninebot One, a device that might best be described as the uncanny love child of a unicycle and a Segway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Seaside Heights had a financial hole to fill. Last fall, the borough learned that it owed $522,000 in tax refunds stretching back to 2010. Its solution - borrowing to pay the money back - would cost a typical homeowner $50.26 annually for four years. But before Seaside Heights could proceed, it needed permission. The Local Finance Board, little known to most New Jerseyans but familiar to municipalities in trouble, scrutinizes a swath of spending: from bonding to pay back taxes, to fire districts looking to buy new ladder trucks, to improvement authorities incurring questionable costs.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
As David Mayer sees it, a mayor's office is a great place to catch a glimpse of the future. "Mayors can see things before others do, because of the developers who come in and express interest," says Mayer, 49, a Democrat and former New Jersey assemblyman who since 2010 has served as mayor of Gloucester Township. "Not only are we going to grow commercially," he declares, "we're going to grow residentially. " Mayer and I are having coffee at the Gloucester Premium Outlets, a sleek new complex of 90 style-conscious discount stores - and villagelike public spaces - just off busy Route 42. The retail center's opening in August was the culmination of a decades-long quest by the 24-square-mile Camden County suburb.
SPORTS
April 8, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Rhys Hoskins asked the Phillies after last season if they would be able to find a team for him to play for in the offseason. There are winter leagues throughout Latin America where U.S. baseball players go to stay busy between seasons. Hoskins wanted to keep his rhythm after a scorching season with two of the Phillies' single-A affiliates. The first baseman told the Phillies that he was willing to go anywhere. And they took him up on it. Hoskins was sent to Sydney, Australia, a world away from Lakewood, N.J., and Clearwater, Fla. The experience was awesome, Hoskins said.
NEWS
April 4, 2016
Kevin R. Johnson is president and CEO of the Philadelphia Opportunities Industrialization Center When it comes to addressing Philadelphia's persistently high poverty rate, what many people fail to understand is that creating jobs is simply not enough. There must be educational investment in the very neighborhoods struggling the most. In a city where an estimated two-thirds of its residents read at an eighth-grade level, or below, we must build creative pathways to employment.
SPORTS
April 3, 2016 | By Matt Gelb, STAFF WRITER
CLEARWATER, Fla. - The Phillies rode 140 miles south on two buses last Sunday as the Grapefruit League schedule slogged to its conclusion. Matt Klentak stayed behind. The 35-year-old general manager of the Phillies walked to the Carpenter Complex, where Phillies minor leaguers scrimmaged against each other in two games. Klentak watched from a perch above home plate. He chatted with a few player-development officials as he shifted his focus from one game to the other. During the weeks spent in Florida, his presence on the back fields was a common sight.
NEWS
April 2, 2016
By Jim Cawley Last week, Pennsylvania officially moved on from its historic nine-month budget impasse. Gov. Wolf's decision to let the latest budget offering become law brings an end to a long and painful time for the health and human services community and, most importantly, for those who rely on us for support. But it's difficult to feel any great sense of relief. As we head into negotiation season for the next budget, there are many lessons to learn from this chapter in our commonwealth's history.
SPORTS
April 2, 2016 | By Bob Brookover, SPORTS COLUMNIST
READING - In the best of times, these exhibitions at minor-league ballparks are billed as a chance for the big-leaguers to show off their advanced skills in the places they developed them. It is what the locals come to see. That is not exactly what was supposed to take place Thursday night at FirstEnergy Park, the charming home of the double-A Reading Fightin Phils. First of all, the skills of the Phillies' best players are still in the development stage in many cases or eroded in a couple of others.
NEWS
March 28, 2016
On March 19, the Drueding Center hosted its annual Stairway to Our Future event at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The Drueding Center is one of Philadelphia's first transitional housing programs for homeless women and children. More than 265 attendees enjoyed a night of hors d'oeuvres, cocktails, dinner, music, dancing, and a silent auction, all in an atmosphere of art and beauty. The program included honoring Sister Ellen Marvel with the Sister Kathryn Etchells Lifetime Achievement Award, named after the Drueding Center's founder.
SPORTS
March 25, 2016 | By Sam Donnellon, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - They assemble each day in the predawn dark, crowding into the Paul Owens Clubhouse of the Phillies' minor league complex. Many eat their breakfast on the stools or floor in front of their lockers, the seats and tables in the small kitchen already filled with players. Sprinkled among this mess of hopefuls are the hoped-fors - players belonging to a much smaller subgroup, some already familiar to Philadelphia baseball fans thirsty for the next era of good baseball to begin.
SPORTS
March 20, 2016 | By Keith Pompey, STAFF WRITER
There was a time, not too long ago, when the 76ers' future appeared brighter than that of the Boston Celtics. Smart decisions over an extended period of time by the Celtics combined with the Sixers' focus on acquiring assets over much-needed players have proven otherwise. And it might be a long time before the Sixers can reach the Celtics' level unless they're lucky. While the Sixers (9-60) felt it was best to extend their tank job into a third straight season, the Celtics (39-30)
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