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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
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NEWS
July 23, 2015
ISSUE | ARTS ECONOMY Cultural learning Yes, Philadelphia needs more arts jobs to "enrich the lives of all Philadelphians," as an Inquirer editorial noted ("A need for more arts jobs," July 20). And it isn't much of a stretch that many of the artists enriching our lives will get their start in the city's public schools, and that the audiences who fill the galleries and concert halls begin their love of the arts in grade school. That's why continuing to remove the arts from the School District curriculum certainly won't add to the enrichment of our lives.
NEWS
July 20, 2015 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA & VINNY VELLA, Daily News Staff Writers gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
SOME PEOPLE stumble aimlessly through life, hoping to find purpose before their hourglass runs out of sand. Jasmine Wright wasn't one of them. "She had a promising future, she was definitely going to make a difference," said Wright's former roommate at Penn State University, who spoke with the Daily News last night on condition of anonymity. "It's beyond sad that her future got cut down so early. " At 27, Wright already had traveled the world in relentless pursuit of something simple, pure, noble - helping the less fortunate.
SPORTS
July 15, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
A dozen days. That constituted an offseason for Zack Steffen this summer, home in Downingtown. That many days between returning from a successful stint as the starting American goalkeeper at the Under-20 World Cup in New Zealand and heading off to another continent, to his professional team in Germany. If a keeper from Chester County eventually represents the United States in a World Cup, remember the dues he is paying now. Steffen spent his winter and spring as the reserve goalkeeper on a German Bundesliga team's reserve squad.
SPORTS
July 14, 2015 | By Jake Kaplan, Inquirer Staff Writer
J.P. Crawford, the Phillies' top-rated prospect, provided a run-scoring single Sunday in the U.S. team's 10-1 win against the World team in the Futures Game at Great American Ball Park in Cincinnati. Crawford, who started at shortstop and batted second, finished 1 for 3 and scored a run. The 20-year-old star at double-A Reading also popped out to the catcher and struck out. It was his second consecutive July representing the Phillies in the game. Aaron Nola, the Phillies' top pitching prospect, also represented the club, but did not pitch because of his six-inning start Friday night for triple-A Lehigh Valley.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Michael Vitez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Valery Swope, 18, answered her phone one afternoon in March. It was Cabrini College, telling her she had been accepted. "I feel so great. Oh, my Lord. I've got to tell everybody!" First, she posed for a selfie. "I've got to take a picture of this face!" Then she got on the phone. The first six people she called were two caseworkers with the state child welfare agency, two social workers appointed by the court, a child-advocate in the public defender's office, and an FBI agent.
NEWS
July 13, 2015 | By Ronnie Polaneczky, Daily News Columnist
DeVAUN BROWN entered Temple University in 2010, and he wanted to join a campus organization that was more than a social club. "I wanted to be involved in something meaningful that would have a lasting impact," says Brown, 24, who works in the Philadelphia School District's office of family and community engagement. So he joined Temple's student chapter of the NAACP. He'd always known about the group but wasn't acquainted with its century-long commitment to civil rights - not just for blacks, but for all Americans, he says.
NEWS
July 6, 2015 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
We know plenty of facts about the renovation of Philadelphia's dysfunctional Gallery. We know the cost ($325 million). We know what the city and state are coughing up to help the developers realize the transformation ($148.5 million). We even know that the old pushcart vendors have been guaranteed spots in the reconfigured mall. And yet we know almost nothing about the architecture. Through months of discussion about the city's financial contribution to the project, Philadelphians were shown only a single hazy rendering of what the Gallery's new Market Street facade would look like after the big white whale of a mall goes under the knife and reemerges as the "Fashion Outlets of Philadelphia.
SPORTS
June 30, 2015 | By Bob Brookover, Inquirer Columnist
Sam Hinkie is the guy you want next to you when you're robbing a bank. He is the guy you can tell a secret and be sure that it is safe with him. He is a man with a plan and good luck trying to get him to tell you exactly what it is. We still are no closer to knowing, however, if Sam Hinkie is the right man for the job of rebuilding a basketball team. The commander of Tank 76 ran his third draft Thursday night and discovered once again that the best-laid plans can be blown to smithereens by unforeseen circumstances.
NEWS
June 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Kenney campaign is looking for a few good community organizers. Or, to be more accurate, a few good community organizers-to-be. "We want to have anchors in all parts of the city," said Lauren Hitt, spokeswoman for Philadelphia Democratic mayoral candidate Jim Kenney. "We want people who believe in Jim or who believe in their community or who just want a voice in city government. " To that end - and to help register new voters - the campaign is looking for volunteers in its "Summer Organizing Fellowship for Jim Kenney.
SPORTS
June 27, 2015 | By Matt Breen, Inquirer Staff Writer
READING - Aaron Nola and J.P. Crawford - the two brightest stars in the Phillies' minor-league system - will get a chance to shine on the national stage after being selected Thursday to play in the Futures Game next month. The two prospects will represent the Phillies on July 12 at the minor-league all-star showcase in Cincinnati, three days before the major-league All-Star Game there. Crawford, ranked by ESPN as the second-best prospect in baseball, is returning to the Futures Game for the second straight year.
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