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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's Oct. 21, 2015. That means the future - as envisioned in the 1989 film Back to the Future II - is officially here. As predicted, we do indeed have flat-screen TVs, video conferencing, and drones - and, appearing on Philadelphia streets of late, a device vaguely resembling Marty McFly's hoverboard. For now, though, Kevin DiCesare still tends to turn heads while cruising in the Spring Garden Street bike lane during his daily, eight-mile-round-trip commute on a Ninebot One, a device that might best be described as the uncanny love child of a unicycle and a Segway.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
May 13, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
After weeks of lessons on nutritious breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack, the instructors had given the kids exactly what they wanted: a class entirely focused on desserts. And, still, the students were pushing back. "Why does it have to be healthy cheesecake?" asked Oscar Wolfe, 13. "I don't want to make my cheesecake healthy. " And thus the challenge of trying to undo the negative perception of eating right. "Well, as my mom always says, 'You are going to want dessert, so you might as well put something good in it,' " said Sally Vitez, my daughter, and the namesake of My Daughter's Kitchen, the healthy-cooking program being taught by volunteers at 31 urban schools throughout the region.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
The Excellent Lombards By Jane Hamilton Grand Central 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Connie Ogle The Wisconsin apple orchard that belongs to the Lombard family in Jane Hamilton's hypnotic new novel is a beacon for the nostalgic and the hopeful, those who nurse their memories carefully and tend to them the way the Lombards care for their trees, their sheep, even their poor, doomed lambs. Narrator Mary Frances "Frankie" Lombard describes the appeal: "There were plenty of people who felt, the minute they started down our long driveway, that they were returning to a bygone time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I have been dating a wonderful man for about six months. We love each other and see a future together. He is a recovering addict, which isn't exactly the problem. The problem is I live in fear that he will relapse. He told me he has relapsed numerous times, never getting much past a year sober, but people don't notice because he has been high-functioning. He just made it to 15 months and I feel like I'm looking for signs of a relapse and living in fear of one. How do I manage this?
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Atlantic City inched closer to bankruptcy Thursday as lawmakers spent hours discussing the Assembly speaker's proposed rescue legislation, only to cancel a scheduled voting session, and Gov. Christie said he would rather let the resort town go bankrupt than write "more checks. " "We do not have time to dawdle here," Christie said at a Statehouse news conference, adding that state officials had told him the city would run out of money in 10 days. That would not automatically trigger bankruptcy, but the city would face severe cash-flow problems.
BUSINESS
May 3, 2016 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Staff Writer
After falling short of expectations last year, Bryn Mawr Bank Corp. rebounded with a strong first-quarter earnings report Thursday. Casey Orr, analyst at Sandler O'Neill + Partners, wrote afterward: "We believe this is the quarter [Bryn Mawr] needed to produce in order to restore investor interest and belief in the story. " Underneath the earnings story, however, is another: the question of whether Bryn Mawr Trust might one day be sold. At least one board member is said to be unhappy with the bank's share price under CEO Frank Leto, and a former employee has filed formal complaints.
NEWS
April 30, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For more than 30 years, the Mandell Education Campus in Melrose Park has been a suburban nexus for the Jewish community, a family-centric complex of schools, offices, and athletic fields on 28 acres not far from the city's edge. When word surfaced in January about the possibility of an apartment building for seniors being added to the bucolic Montgomery County grounds, a battle cry went out. But what started as a fight for open space seems to be turning into a wake-up call about broader issues on a campus that is being utilized less and less, and a collaborative effort to find solutions.
BUSINESS
April 27, 2016 | By Chris Mondics, Staff Writer
For many trade specialists and economists, the huge unknown underlying Great Britain's possible departure from the European Union is what impact it would have on the British economy, and what that would mean for Americans who do business there. It is Andrew Hood's job to advise hedge funds, investment banks, manufacturers, and others on the potential fallout if British voters decide in a June 23 referendum that it is time to leave. What that means essentially is getting clients ready to get ready.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: I was sure I wanted to spend the rest of my life with my boyfriend of three years, until I asked him if he felt the same, and he said no. He says that he doesn't want to get married or move in together, but that he might feel different in the future. We discussed breaking up, and he made it clear he didn't want that. Where do we/I go from here? Now I feel insecure and unsure. Part of me thinks I should just enjoy the relationship without needing to be sure of a future, but a big part of me feels betrayed that he doesn't want to make a commitment.
NEWS
April 16, 2016 | By Maddie Hanna, TRENTON BUREAU
Seaside Heights had a financial hole to fill. Last fall, the borough learned that it owed $522,000 in tax refunds stretching back to 2010. Its solution - borrowing to pay the money back - would cost a typical homeowner $50.26 annually for four years. But before Seaside Heights could proceed, it needed permission. The Local Finance Board, little known to most New Jerseyans but familiar to municipalities in trouble, scrutinizes a swath of spending: from bonding to pay back taxes, to fire districts looking to buy new ladder trucks, to improvement authorities incurring questionable costs.
NEWS
April 11, 2016 | By Kevin Riordan, Columnist
As David Mayer sees it, a mayor's office is a great place to catch a glimpse of the future. "Mayors can see things before others do, because of the developers who come in and express interest," says Mayer, 49, a Democrat and former New Jersey assemblyman who since 2010 has served as mayor of Gloucester Township. "Not only are we going to grow commercially," he declares, "we're going to grow residentially. " Mayer and I are having coffee at the Gloucester Premium Outlets, a sleek new complex of 90 style-conscious discount stores - and villagelike public spaces - just off busy Route 42. The retail center's opening in August was the culmination of a decades-long quest by the 24-square-mile Camden County suburb.
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