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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 11, 2016
By James H. Lytle Given the frequent and considered attention to the challenges and prospects of public schooling in Philadelphia, it may help to have a clearer understanding of why the city's district schools are having such difficulty competing with charter schools. Although this is a simplification, it's reasonably straightforward to explain why charter schools have a substantial advantage. Imagine a charter school with 700 students. It receives approximately $10,000 per student each year from a combination of state, federal, and local government allocations; its 100 special-needs students get an additional $10,000 per year, adding $1 million to the school's annual budget of $8 million a year.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
ISSUE | PRE-K Early start is key As a retired educator, I agree with three pediatricians concerning early schooling ("Failure to adequately fund pre-K hurts Pa. children," Wednesday). I am especially pleased that they endorsed state funding of structured pre-K programs such as Head Start and Pre-K Counts. I have observed Head Start classrooms while supervising teachers in training and can testify that they provide enriched, holistic environments for children starting at age 3. Besides school readiness, they provide nutrition, training in good health practices, and parental involvement.
NEWS
May 30, 2016
On May 18, Philadelphia Futures, along with event host Phillies catcher Carlos Ruiz and his teammates, presented the annual Philadelphia Futures Get in the Game event. Philadelphia Futures provides low-income students who are the first in their families to attend college with access to resources and opportunities necessary for admission and success. Participants came together for the bowling tournament and to support the cause. Guests enjoyed buffet finger food, drinks, bidding on silent-auction items of sports memorabilia and on live-auction items.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Peco Energy Co. wants to install a self-sustaining "microgrid" in a Delaware County community that has endured a large number of power outages. The utility has asked the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission for permission to spend about $35 million to install the experimental microgrid in Concord Township, Delaware County, along the Route 1 corridor in Concordville. The microgrid, which could operate independently of the regional power grid during an widespread outage, would supply power to a 388-acre area that includes the Concord Township Municipal Complex, a fire station, a sewage-treatment plant, a retirement community, two medical facilities, two motels, two shopping centers, and a Wawa store.
NEWS
May 18, 2016
By Paul R. Brown and John J. Christopher Woodrow Wilson was a complicated man and, as with many historic figures, left behind an ambiguous legacy. The history books cast him as a pioneering, perhaps idealistic visionary who worked tirelessly to recast the order of international affairs and the community of nations. At the same time, the 28th president sought to cleanse the government of African American civil servants, and some of his political views may have contributed to the resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan in the early 20th century.
SPORTS
May 18, 2016 | David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
AT FIRST glance, it seemed too tidy. On Monday night, the best high school pitcher in the country took the mound within long-tossing distance of Citizens Bank Park, the home of the team that happens to be picking first in next month's MLB draft. If Jason Groome had looked to the right before toeing the rubber, he would've seen the Philadelphia skyline peeking behind the second deck at Campbell's Field in Camden. As the sun set over the Delaware, the hulking southpaw was pitching in the shadow of the city he could call home.
FOOD
May 13, 2016 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, FOOD EDITOR
After weeks of lessons on nutritious breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snack, the instructors had given the kids exactly what they wanted: a class entirely focused on desserts. And, still, the students were pushing back. "Why does it have to be healthy cheesecake?" asked Oscar Wolfe, 13. "I don't want to make my cheesecake healthy. " And thus the challenge of trying to undo the negative perception of eating right. "Well, as my mom always says, 'You are going to want dessert, so you might as well put something good in it,' " said Sally Vitez, my daughter, and the namesake of My Daughter's Kitchen, the healthy-cooking program being taught by volunteers at 31 urban schools throughout the region.
NEWS
May 8, 2016
The Excellent Lombards By Jane Hamilton Grand Central 288 pp. $26 Reviewed by Connie Ogle The Wisconsin apple orchard that belongs to the Lombard family in Jane Hamilton's hypnotic new novel is a beacon for the nostalgic and the hopeful, those who nurse their memories carefully and tend to them the way the Lombards care for their trees, their sheep, even their poor, doomed lambs. Narrator Mary Frances "Frankie" Lombard describes the appeal: "There were plenty of people who felt, the minute they started down our long driveway, that they were returning to a bygone time.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I have been dating a wonderful man for about six months. We love each other and see a future together. He is a recovering addict, which isn't exactly the problem. The problem is I live in fear that he will relapse. He told me he has relapsed numerous times, never getting much past a year sober, but people don't notice because he has been high-functioning. He just made it to 15 months and I feel like I'm looking for signs of a relapse and living in fear of one. How do I manage this?
NEWS
May 7, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - Atlantic City inched closer to bankruptcy Thursday as lawmakers spent hours discussing the Assembly speaker's proposed rescue legislation, only to cancel a scheduled voting session, and Gov. Christie said he would rather let the resort town go bankrupt than write "more checks. " "We do not have time to dawdle here," Christie said at a Statehouse news conference, adding that state officials had told him the city would run out of money in 10 days. That would not automatically trigger bankruptcy, but the city would face severe cash-flow problems.
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