CollectionsFuture
IN THE NEWS

Future

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Columnist
If legendary snoozer Rip Van Winkle went to sleep in the spring of 1982 and woke up today, his beard might have stretched a hundred nasty, matted yards, but he'd probably think he had taken only a power nap: Mad Max is going post-apocalyptic in movie theaters. Poltergeist is poised to scare up business at the box office. And Jerry Brown is governor of California. OK, the new Mad Max is called Fury Road , not Road Warrior , and Tom Hardy and Charlize Theron star, not Mel Gibson.
NEWS
May 18, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
The grassy Burlington City promenade came alive Saturday with rows of tents that shielded politicians, business representatives, and civic groups from the bright sunshine and the gentle breezes wafting from the Delaware. About 1,000 people milled around for Burlington Day, stopping to gawk at the Zumba dancers off the shoreline and the colorful potted plants that were offered for sale by a Marine Corps auxiliary. Many were drawn to a display of pictures, set up on easels, that illustrated what would be the riverfront promenade of the future, if a planned multimillion-dollar makeover is approved.
BUSINESS
May 15, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia city controller says the "greatest economic impact" in jobs and tax revenue for the 200-acre Southport section at the eastern end of the Navy Yard would be as a marine terminal for container cargo. Controller Alan Butkovitz said in a 15-page report released Wednesday that putting an energy port on part of the land also made "long-term economic sense," but should not impinge on the scale needed for a modern container ship terminal. Officials in recent years have suggested use of this undeveloped site for a marine terminal, energy port, or auto-processing facility.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 12, 2015 | By Patricia Mans, For The Inquirer
Although Daevon is only 8, he already has his sights set on a career. Make that two careers: He aspires to be a firefighter and a professional basketball player. Until he's old enough to do one - or both - he has plenty of other interests to keep him occupied. He's athletic, and delights in any kind of physical activity, including riding his bike. In school, his best subject may be math, but his favorite class is gym. He also enjoys video and computer games, Buffalo wings, French fries, and shrimp-fried rice.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By John N. Mitchell, Inquirer Staff Writer
About an hour after separate head butts left their foreheads spouting blood in their eyes and onto the canvas, newly crowned Pennsylvania State Heavyweight champion Amir Mansour and Joey Dawejko shared a bench in the champ's dressing room, talking about the future. "Keep building it up and getting that experience," Mansour, 42, an ice pack over his eye, told the 24-year-old Dawejko. "I've been in four 12-rounders and eight 10-rounders. This is your first 10-rounder, and you did a hell of a job. . . . And you hit hard as [heck]
SPORTS
May 7, 2015 | BY JEROME MAIDA, For the Daily News
WITH "Avengers: Age Of Ultron" crushing everything in its path and obliterating box-office records along the way, the question, as always, is: "What does the future of the Marvel cinematic universe have in store?" Thankfully, Comics Guy was able to chat with Marvel Studios head honcho Kevin Feige to get some answers! (Warning: Mild spoilers if you haven't seen "Ultron" yet!) In the wake of the premiere screening of "Age of Ultron," Feige was already excitedly talking about the next film on Marvel's slate.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Phil Anastasia, Inquirer Columnist
Preston Brown packed up a teenager's future this week. He gathered up the recruiting letters for one of Woodrow Wilson High School's most promising football players and delivered them to the family, along with his condolences. Brown said Ja'Meer Bullard was a "special talent" on the football field. But that's hardly the only reason why Brown has been so devastated by Bullard's death - so haunted by the eerie familiarity of the violence, so shocked by the harsh reality of another young life lost on Camden's streets.
SPORTS
May 3, 2015 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
MIKE BABCOCK didn't hesitate. Addressing reporters in Detroit yesterday for the first time since his Red Wings were eliminated by Braydon Coburn and Tampa Bay on Wednesday night in Game 7 of their first-round NHL playoff series, Babcock said he struggled on Thursday. "The worst day I've had coaching in Detroit, period, in my 10 years here was [Thursday], bar none," Babcock said. "So was that because I thought in my heart we were going to win that series and that we should still be playing?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Laurie Anderson - calling from the Philharmonie de Paris, scoping it out for a show - is balancing many things. That balancing act will be on display in her Language of the Future show at Princeton's McCarter Theatre on Friday evening. Everything this pioneering performance artist/electronic music composer does is about the next thing, something in the future. "I don't think I'll ever have a message, or a philosophy," Anderson said. "I don't want to telegraph anything coded. " Her debut directorial full-length film, Heart of a Dog , commissioned by the Franco-German TV network Arte, was supposed to be about a philosophy of life - "until I told them that I didn't have one, repeatedly," she said, laughing.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Recent census figures indicate that the influx of young adults, immigrants, and empty nesters to Philadelphia could be ebbing. The growth they have brought, especially to areas surrounding Center City, could recede, and neighborhoods that aren't ready for development could miss out on what's left of the trend. Philadelphia's Second Councilmanic District - encompassing parts of Center City, South Philadelphia, and Southwest Philadelphia - is especially vulnerable. With deep poverty as well as significant wealth, it has seen rapid change in areas like Point Breeze and Grays Ferry.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|