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Future

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NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
NEWS
April 12, 2010 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although Christopher is only 14, he is already thinking about his future. When he grows up he would like to be a policeman and work at a video game store. Other plans include buying a house with a big garage and owning expensive cars. For the present, he keeps busy with a variety of activities, including the computer, playing video games and dodge ball, watching television, and going to movies. He also enjoys testing his skill at word-search puzzles and is very good at them. Enrolled in the eighth grade, Christopher benefits from special education classes.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 5, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
Dust off your high-school physics knowledge for a moment, and recall the difference between batteries and capacitors. The former can store a lot of energy but take a long time to charge, while capacitors have more limited storage but can be charged in seconds. Lately, engineers have been developing devices that combine the best attributes of both: so-called supercapacitors that charge quickly and have improved storage capacity - some of which have been in use for several years in China, in fast-charging public buses.
NEWS
November 21, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
PHILADELPHIA is in the heart of the Northeast rail corridor, where more than 2,000 passenger trains move 75,000 riders daily between Washington,D.C. and Boston on speed-restricted tracks across aging bridges and through ancient tunnels, powered by 1930s-era equipment. The whole system needs an extreme makeover as desperately as the Phillies do. Yesterday, at SEPTA headquarters in Center City, the Federal Railroad Administration's NEC (Northeast Corridor) FUTURE program unveiled a public glimpse of what that makeover might be by 2040.
NEWS
November 17, 2014 | BY VALERIE RUSS, Daily News Staff Writer russv@phillynews.com, 215-854-5987
T HE PAST AND future of North Philadelphia will be the topic of four gatherings this week. Tomorrow, the Wagner Free Institute of Science will screen archival news footage, donated to Temple University Library by 6ABC News,in a program called "Unedited North Philadelphia: Girard to Lehigh. " The program, from 6 to 8 p.m., is free. The institute, which has been on Montgomery Avenue near 17th Street since 1865, will accept donations. Ken Scott, president of the Beech Companies, will moderate a panel discussion afterward.
SPORTS
November 16, 2014 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
HOUSTON - After nine games, after two humiliating drubbings, after zero victories, the 76ers are battered and beaten. Michael Carter-Williams talks about the team's desire to continue to fight. Coach Brett Brown, who had a successful career as an assistant coach with the San Antonio Spurs, doesn't want anyone's pity. But what else do you expect the face of the franchise and his coach, who demands high energy and effort, to say publicly? You'll get the real answer by glancing into the eyes of the players and coaches during this three-game Texas road trip.
SPORTS
November 13, 2014 | By John Smallwood, Daily News Staff Writer
FINALLY, after all of last season and an 0-7 start to this one, we will get to see Sixers general manager Sam Hinkie's master plan in action. Tonight in Dallas, Michael Carter-Williams and Nerlens Noel are expected to play together in an NBA game for the first time. Because of knee surgery that kept Noel from playing last season and offseason shoulder surgery that kept Carter-Williams out action to begin this season, the first core pieces of the Sixers' rebuilding have done little more than share some practice time together since both were 2013 lottery picks.
NEWS
November 11, 2014 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
LAST YEAR, Angela Pannell was a young single mom on welfare who had debt from a community college nursing program and no money to continue earning her degree. She was an intelligent, ambitious woman with a child, no job and no prospects. "Every day, I was harassing Welfare to Work," said Pannell, of North Philadelphia. "I'd call and say, 'Hey, how you doing? It's me again. You have anything for me?' " Last January, they did - Philly Future Track, a life-changer. From winter's freezing cold to summer's sweltering heat, Pannell and 132 other unemployed, at-risk young people cleaned waist-high trash, needles and dead rats out of the city's alleys in return for city-paid job-skills training.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Rick Steves, For The Inquirer
When I visited Berlin recently to update my guidebook, I also scouted locations for a new TV show. I found the city as vibrant as ever - with massive infrastructure projects in progress all around town. The cranes speckling the horizon in every direction put an end to the idea of filming anytime soon - but the commotion is not a problem for visitors. If anything, seeing all the changes in the works made me eager to come back soon to see the Berlin of the future. But even as the city busily builds itself into the 21st century, Berlin has made a point of acknowledging and remembering its past.
BUSINESS
November 9, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Liberty Energy Trust L.L.C., founded by a Russian-born, Harvard-trained former Enron executive, had several strikes against it when it bid to buy the city-owned Philadelphia Gas Works. Liberty has no assets and no utility operating experience. Its offer to buy PGW was $160 million shy of UIL Holdings Corp.'s winning $1.86 billion bid. It finished out of the running. But Liberty had one winning quality that seems to have intrigued members of Philadelphia's City Council: political juice.
NEWS
November 2, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission will hold a one-day session on Nov. 14 at Drexel University to explore plans for Philadelphia Gas Works in the aftermath of a collapsed deal to sell the city utility. The session will not be aimed at dissecting the collapse of the $1.86 billion agreement to sell PGW to UIL Holdings Corp., but will address how PGW plans to address its high rates, aging infrastructure and low-income programs in the absence of a sale, said Jennifer Kocher, the PUC's spokeswoman.
SPORTS
November 1, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
THE REC LEAGUE basketball season hasn't started yet in Monkton, Md., so neighbors A.J. Burnett and Scott Proefrock haven't worked on the coaching sidelines together since the Phillies season ended a month ago. Proefrock, the assistant general manager, hasn't even seen Burnett, the veteran pitcher, in October. "I've been up here [Philadelphia] and in Florida," said Proefrock, who coached with Burnett on their sons' basketball team last winter. "I know he went away for his wife's birthday last weekend.
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