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Future

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NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
TEDx is - first, last, and always - about talking. Talking originally, surprisingly, persuasively, and concretely about something new - a new way of thinking, of making things, or, in the case of Friday's TEDx Philadelphia, titled "The New Workshop of the World," a new way of being this city. TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is a worldwide series of forward-thinking interdisciplinary conferences. It's turning 30 this year, and a TED birthday bash just went down in Vancouver, British Columbia.
NEWS
April 3, 1993 | ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/ DAILY NEWS
Latasha Williamson, 12, of the J. Cooke Middle School, peers into a solar furnace exhibit yesterday at the 45th Annual Delaware Valley Science Fair, held at the Civic Center.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | G. LOIE GROSSMANN/ DAILY NEWS
Hero Scholarship recipient Raymond S. Fredericksdorf (right) holds jumbo ticket to Hero Scholarship Show yesterday on City Hall tower, with help from (from left) Vyette and Milt Rosenberg, Norb McGettigan, Reginald Beauchamp and Abe Rosen. Fredericksdorf's father, Police Officer Raymond F. Fredericksdorf, was killed in 1972 in the line of duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 2001 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Does man use tools or vice-versa? This question haunts 2001: A Space Odyssey, Stanley Kubrick's masterwork about the evolution of humanity from monkey to man and of tools from club to computer. The Chestnut Hill Film Group is offering a rare opportunity to see Kubrick's 1968 masterpiece on the big screen, and to understand that no one imagined the way the future looked more evocatively than the filmmaker in his hugely influential, if sometimes impenetrable, space opera. 2001: A Space Odyssey is scheduled to be shown at the Chestnut Hill branch of the Free Library of Philadelphia.
NEWS
September 12, 1986
It is of great importance to follow the news reports such as those published in The Inquirer about the emerging countries of South America - Argentina, Chile, Brazil and Peru, among others - because the true future of the United States lies with the republics south of the border. It is not far away the day when Hispanics of U.S. citizenship will represent America before the Latin American republics, hence the need to speak the Spanish language on the part of those willing to travel, do business or settle there.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | BY JONATHAN A. SAIDEL
'You can never plan the future by the past," said Edmund Burke. Too often, however, government plans for the future are based only on past experiences. When government does look forward, it may be for only one budget cycle. As a departure from this norm, the city controller's office undertook a project to make suggestions for the future based on an analysis of the challenges and opportunities that await Philadelphia in the next century.The product of that project became the book, "Philadelphia: A New Urban Direction.
NEWS
August 3, 2009 | By Patricia Mans FOR THE INQUIRER
Although he has just become a teenager, Gerard is already thinking about a career. He may become a lawyer but is also considering other possibilities. The 13-year-old enjoys playing many sports, but feels he is best at basketball. He intends to keep playing that sport and football. Open, friendly and articulate, Gerard had a great time at summer camp recently. In school, he earns good grades and especially likes his history class. Gerard has a positive outlook on his present and future, and hopes that future will include being adopted.
NEWS
February 2, 1997 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
More people - but with smaller family sizes - living in ever-bigger houses on larger lots are adding up to a loss of Chester County's open spaces, natural features and farmland. It's a trend that county government is seeking to reverse, through guidelines for future growth, planning money for municipalities, and preservation of open space. Next month, the county will hold a summit meeting on the issue. A conference is set for 4:30 to 9 p.m. Monday, March 31, at Unionville High School to discuss the successes and failures of the county's preservation efforts and to chart local and countywide strategies to guide growth.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Lynn Hamilton, Special to The Inquirer
Money makes the wheels go round. That simple, yet complicated, message dominates the day-to-day existence of SEPTA, according to Richard G. Bickler, the transit authority's director of long-range planning in its Planning, Development and Real Estate Department. Bickler, 42, of Ardmore, has held the newly created position for two months. While he is not unaware of SEPTA's present problems, his job is to frame the future by creating a long-range plan, which he said also would serve as a marketing tool.
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SPORTS
April 19, 2014 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
Thaddeus Young, who probably felt like the only shipwreck survivor still stranded on the beach this season, said he's going to wait until after the draft to have his big talk with 76ers management. Young wants to see what the team does on draft night and gauge for himself how long this rebuilding process might really take. He has played seven seasons for an organization that has had five head coaches, four general managers, and two ownership groups during that span. Through it all, he has waited for the one thing that means something to him. "I just want to win," he said Thursday, as the team packed up after a season-ending win over Miami on Wednesday night that closed its record at 19-63.
SPORTS
April 18, 2014 | BY BOB COONEY, Daily News Staff Writer cooneyb@phillynews.com
THADDEUS YOUNG has always known how to keep his head down, play hard, say all the right things and let the chips fall where they may. That was then, though. Times could be changing for the 6-9 forward, who just completed his seventh season with the 76ers. He's never been a "what about me" type of person, but the business side of the sport could very well have the 25-year-old veteran thinking about his future. He is due to make $9.16 million next season, then has a player option of $9.7 million.
NEWS
April 14, 2014 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
THE INCOMING president of Community College of Philadelphia said the school faces lots of challenges in helping to rebuild the city's middle class. Donald Generals Jr., chosen two weeks ago from three finalists for the position after an extensive seven-month search, officially starts July 1. The Paterson, N.J., native comes to CCP with 30 years of experience in higher education, most recently as vice president of academic affairs at Mercer County Community College near Trenton. Generals acknowledged that as a gateway to many of the area's four-year institutions, CCP faces several hurdles, including recent reductions in government funding, which have led to steeper tuition increases.
NEWS
April 7, 2014
The Annie E. Casey Foundation has released a new report that people won't like for different reasons. At a time when many Americans insist it's time to stop thinking in terms of black and white, or brown or yellow, the Casey report says race still matters. The foundation devised a Race for Results Index, which considered metrics such as the number of babies born at normal weights, eighth graders who scored at or above proficient in math, children in two-parent families, and children in families above 200 percent of the poverty level.
SPORTS
April 6, 2014 | Ed Rendell, Daily News Columnist
WHEN THE SIXERS tied the record for longest losing streak in major pro sports, I was contacted by "Today" and asked to comment about how Philadelphia fans were taking all of this. Even though I was in Miami to make a speech when I received the call, I was willing to tape an interview. They came over and did a 10-minute interview, of which they used about 40 seconds. I told them Philadelphia sports fans, despite our reputation for being difficult, unruly and very hard on our teams, are sophisticated enough to understand what it takes to win. Therefore, I went on, our fans were not really upset, because we understood the long-term goal and were willing to endure some basketball ignominy in the short run if it meant we were on the path to becoming competitive.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some people, and some companies, look for stability when faced with tumultuous times. Exton-based WPCS International is trying a slightly different tack in meeting its challenges. WPCS, which says it employs about 250 in designing and building communications infrastructure, is diving into bitcoin. Or rather, the technology of trading bitcoin. In existence - virtually - for only a few years, bitcoin is digital money. No central government authority backs bitcoin, as the U.S. government does with the dollar and as other governments do with their currencies.
NEWS
March 30, 2014 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
TEDx is - first, last, and always - about talking. Talking originally, surprisingly, persuasively, and concretely about something new - a new way of thinking, of making things, or, in the case of Friday's TEDx Philadelphia, titled "The New Workshop of the World," a new way of being this city. TED (Technology, Entertainment, Design) is a worldwide series of forward-thinking interdisciplinary conferences. It's turning 30 this year, and a TED birthday bash just went down in Vancouver, British Columbia.
NEWS
March 18, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Buddy may be the only member of St. Rita of Cascia parish in Bellmawr unconcerned that his church might close. But then, Buddy is a dog. The pastor's golden retriever is a familiar sight in this Roman Catholic congregation as he trots down the aisle most Sunday's alongside the Rev. Carmel Polidarmo. Both were in their usual high spirits Sunday, greeting parishioners as they exited onto the sidewalk shortly before noon. "How you doing?" Polidarmo asked an older couple.
SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Bob Cooney, Daily News Staff Writer
I WAS IN the airport the other day when a guy approached me to talk about the 76ers. It was a typical conversation when you cover a team that is losing at the alarming rate that this team is, and one that I always enjoy: Him: "Man, that must be tough watching them play every night. " Me: "Yeah, but I love my job. " Him: "This might turn out to be one of the worst seasons in the history of the NBA, right?" Me: "It certainly is looking that way. " Him: "But the good thing is, with the draft picks and the money that they have, they'll probably be a playoff team next year.
NEWS
March 9, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
With surgery and chemotherapy, Roberta Bash, 67, of Downingtown beat advanced-stage ovarian cancer in 2010. Then, it came back. "Cancer can go dormant, and I didn't know that," she said. The second time, Bash wanted to explore all her options - including an experimental treatment at Penn Medicine that manipulates a patient's tumor cells to trigger an immune response. So, during her surgery last March, instead of allowing her tumor to be tossed out or donated for research, she saved it. The company StoreMyTumor, which markets itself as a concierge service for tumors, negotiated the tissue's harvest, processing, and cryopreservation.
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