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Future Development

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NEWS
January 31, 1988 | By Chuck McDevitt, Special to The Inquirer
Ridley Park residents, who during last year's centennial festivities celebrated the borough's past, have been asked to help plan the community's future. Borough planning officials held a special meeting with residents Wednesday night to discuss "what we should do to make Ridley Park a nice place to live for the next 100 years," said Robert Glenn, chairman of the borough planning commission. "The borough was given to us by the people who preceded us and I think it's our responsibility to give it back as it was given to us, if not better," said commission member Ed Guy. "I don't want my generation to be blamed by the future generation.
NEWS
December 1, 1991 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Special to The Inquirer
A rural Christmas tree farm off Eayrestown Road could become the site of 69 new houses within the next five years, according to plans approved by the Lumberton Township Planning Board. Frederick McCarthy, who owns the farm, told the board Nov. 7 that although he had no immediate plans to develop the property, he wanted to gain the township's approval so he could "put it on hold for the future. " Although McCarthy requested a seven-year agreement to guarantee the subdivision approval for a certain length of time, the Planning Board voted to give him approval for five years.
NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The longtime home of the Red Eagle Tavern near Cherry Hill Mall has sold on speculation of future development at the site, real estate services firm Markeim Chalmers Inc., which brokered the transaction, said in a statement Tuesday. Markeim Chalmers said the buyer, identified as a local developer, paid $2.2 million for the shuttered 10,465-square-foot bar and banquet hall on 2.5 acres at Route 38 and Chapel Avenue, inclusive of its liquor license. Kay's Red Eagle Tavern closed at the site in April after 65 years.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The split-rail fence about a quarter-mile west of Harts Lane may look simply like a rustic barrier snaking its way through Whitemarsh's Miquon Forest. But those who live in the neighborhood know better. For them, it separates two millionaire couples at war in one of the most vicious development disputes the township has ever seen. For six years, Gary and Nancy Veloric have fought with neighbors Brad and Andrea Heffler over a horse corral and trails the Hefflers built on their property in 2005.
NEWS
May 5, 1986 | By Francie Scott, Special to The Inquirer
The Conshohocken Planning Commission has recommended adoption of the "community facilities" chapter of the borough's comprehensive plan. The move at Thursday's meeting brought the borough a step closer to a new policy document to guide its future development. The chapter listed such existing services as sewerage and water supply and such facilities as schools, churches and libraries. The borough's comprehensive plan has not been revised since 1964, and two more chapters must be reviewed before the document is complete.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Sears building that has been vacant for years on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden was sold Monday to Campbell Soup Co. for $3.5 million after years of litigation. The former department store will be razed to make room for a 13-acre office park, which Campbell spokesman Anthony Sanzio said would ideally house professional firms and new businesses in the financially struggling city. "It's a win for us, a win for the city, and hopefully a win" for former owner Ilan Zaken, Sanzio said.
NEWS
October 15, 1989 | By Peter J. Shelly, Special to The Inquirer
At Thursday night's meeting, the Abington Board of Commissioners won major concessions from representatives of the Hillside Cemetery before approving an application to subdivide the cemetery's 172-acre site. One of those conditions was that the minimum lot size for future development on the residentially zoned site be increased by 50 percent. Apparently, that was not enough to satisfy the commissioners' concerns about the density of future development. Seconds after the 14-0 vote to approve the subdivision of the site into two lots, the commissioners unanimously voted to schedule a special meeting to rezone the two plots created by the subdivision.
NEWS
June 21, 1986 | By Vic Skowronski, Special to The Inquirer
The Cherry Hill Township Council this week heard a proposal to widen a section of Marlkress Road from two lanes to four to accommodate a projected traffic increase from the proposed Route 70 expansion and future development of land along the roadway. The area consists of about 1,800 feet of road between the U.S. Post Office at the north end of Marlkress Road and the former Sergi Farm at the south end, which has been purchased by the Canuso Construction Co. for future development, according to township engineer Richard Rohrbach.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission declined Friday to place the ground beneath a pair of Frankford Avenue garages on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. The unusual application for historic designation asserted that the Mutual Burial Ground of Kensington, an old graveyard actively used from the 1820s to the late 1860s, lay partially beneath 1834-48 Frankford Avenue - the location where developer Ori Feibush plans to knock down garages that stand there and build about 41 residential units.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | By Jeff McGaw, Special to The Inquirer
Upper Moreland's Board of Commissioners isn't in any hurry to solve what some say is a convention center shortage until it can discuss how such a facility would affect traffic, parking and the future development of the township. In a meeting Monday, the commissioners tabled a proposal that would expand the definition of property zoned for limited industrial use to include convention centers. The issue likely will be decided at the board's August meeting, commissioners said. Such a change could affect the future development of four areas in the township that are now zoned for limited industrial use. That presented a roadblock for commissioners, according to Commissioner Richard D. Booth.
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NEWS
July 21, 2016 | By Jacob Adelman, STAFF WRITER
The longtime home of the Red Eagle Tavern near Cherry Hill Mall has sold on speculation of future development at the site, real estate services firm Markeim Chalmers Inc., which brokered the transaction, said in a statement Tuesday. Markeim Chalmers said the buyer, identified as a local developer, paid $2.2 million for the shuttered 10,465-square-foot bar and banquet hall on 2.5 acres at Route 38 and Chapel Avenue, inclusive of its liquor license. Kay's Red Eagle Tavern closed at the site in April after 65 years.
NEWS
July 10, 2016 | By Stephan Salisbury, Culture Writer
The Philadelphia Historical Commission declined Friday to place the ground beneath a pair of Frankford Avenue garages on the Philadelphia Register of Historic Places. The unusual application for historic designation asserted that the Mutual Burial Ground of Kensington, an old graveyard actively used from the 1820s to the late 1860s, lay partially beneath 1834-48 Frankford Avenue - the location where developer Ori Feibush plans to knock down garages that stand there and build about 41 residential units.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The phone calls started pouring in to the Whitpain Township offices in the fall. Developers were on the line, wondering how many homes they could build at the site of the Meadowlands Country Club. Inquiries from developers are typical, said Township Manager Roman Pronczak. But these calls were disconcerting. The 128-acre property in the heart of Blue Bell is a golf course and a valuable piece of open space. "Golf courses are starting to be called the last frontier of open-space preservation in suburban communities," said Fred Conner, chairman of the Whitpain Board of Supervisors.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cherry Hill officials say a planning tool often used to save farmland from development may help in their efforts to preserve the Woodcrest Country Club golf course from being used for housing. The owners of the club are mulling an option to sell their development rights at the 150-acre site to the township, Camden County, and the state, Freeholder Jeffrey L. Nash said this week. Nash said the club's owner - First Montgomery Group of Marlton, a real estate company controlled by the Haydinger family - was receptive to the idea, and that the county has the state-approved appraisers who had done the appraisal last year now determining the value of development rights on the land.
NEWS
December 13, 2013 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
SEVERAL MEMBERS of City Council are at odds over rules governing real-estate development in city neighborhoods. Introduced by Councilman Bobby Henon, a bill made headway yesterday when it moved through the rules committee by a 6-2 vote. Henon said his bill relieves the burdens on locally based Registered Community Organizations (RCO) to notify neighbors of proposed land use. "Seventy-five to 80 percent of the time, RCOs don't notify [residents], so it's shifting the burden from the RCOs over to the applicants," he said.
NEWS
June 16, 2012 | By Bonnie L. Cook and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Upper Merion Township supervisors have voted unanimously to approve a $13 million settlement of legal wrangling over the former Valley Forge Golf Course, the last undeveloped tract in King of Prussia. The deal, approved Thursday night, calls for the township to pay $1 million to the former property owner, the Hankin Family Partnership. The Hankin family went to court almost three decades ago, insisting it had the right to sell to a developer. The township refused to rezone the agriculturally zoned tract for higher-density development.
NEWS
June 13, 2012 | By Claudia Vargas and INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Sears building that has been vacant for years on Admiral Wilson Boulevard in Camden was sold Monday to Campbell Soup Co. for $3.5 million after years of litigation. The former department store will be razed to make room for a 13-acre office park, which Campbell spokesman Anthony Sanzio said would ideally house professional firms and new businesses in the financially struggling city. "It's a win for us, a win for the city, and hopefully a win" for former owner Ilan Zaken, Sanzio said.
NEWS
December 18, 2011 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A planned extension of Delaware Avenue in Bridesburg is tied up in a dispute between the city and the Delaware River Port Authority, which could jeopardize $15 million in federal funds awarded for the extension, according to city officials. An impatient U.S. Rep. Allyson Y. Schwartz (D., Phila.), who obtained the federal funding in 2005, said Friday that the two sides "have to work this out. " The city wants to extend Delaware Avenue about one mile, from Lewis Street over Frankford Creek and under the Betsy Ross Bridge to Buckius Street.
NEWS
March 4, 2011 | By Jeremy Roebuck, Inquirer Staff Writer
The split-rail fence about a quarter-mile west of Harts Lane may look simply like a rustic barrier snaking its way through Whitemarsh's Miquon Forest. But those who live in the neighborhood know better. For them, it separates two millionaire couples at war in one of the most vicious development disputes the township has ever seen. For six years, Gary and Nancy Veloric have fought with neighbors Brad and Andrea Heffler over a horse corral and trails the Hefflers built on their property in 2005.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Inga Saffron INQUIRER ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Developer Bart Blatstein has been a powerful force in refashioning the old working-class, beer-making neighborhood of Northern Liberties into a hipster enclave studded with galleries and cafes. Now, he is about to push that bohemian district in a tonier direction with the construction of an immense, 21st-century retail-and-residential hive on the former Schmidt's brewery site. Blatstein's company, Tower Investments, will hold a formal groundbreaking today for the first phase of that project, a $30 million retail complex anchored by a Pathmark supermarket.
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