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NEWS
July 5, 1998 | By Susan Weidener, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
History is being preserved here, not in time capsules or temperature-controlled rooms but in children's plastic swimming pools. In the dark and musty lower level of a former barn on Swedesford Road, parts of trees more than a century old are soaking in polyethylene glycol 1000. The thick slabs, four feet in diameter, are the remnants of the oak and sycamore trees that beautified the front lawn of the 18th-century Zook House at Exton Square Mall. They were taken down in February to make way for a Boscov's department store as part of the Rouse Co.'s mall-expansion project.
NEWS
January 5, 1986
Not one piece of research has yet uncovered a single instance of a civilization or nation that underwent a massive buildup of military weapons and did not eventually use them. We must work to encourage leaders and governments to spend their precious resources for schools, hospitals and desperately needed economic development rather than for bombs and preparations for war. And that goes for our own country. For we have a responsibility for the world and its inhabitants to cherish and preserve it for those who - God willing - will be the future generations.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
After reading about the Lazaretto Quarantine Station in Tinicum Township, I began thinking about my grandparents, who immigrated from Lithuania ("Township rescues historic site on Delaware," Aug. 22). They did not come from Europe to New York, but to Philadelphia. I think that if people could find out if their ancestors were at Lazaretto Station, they would be willing to donate money to help preserve this historic building. Are documents available to the general public to find out who came to America through Philadelphia ports and who was detained at this quarantine station?
NEWS
February 15, 1986
The ballroom of the Bellevue Stratford is one of the most beautiful in the country and certainly the East Coast. It should be preserved at all cost. Any building of merit that has survived 70 years or more in our throw-away culture has a special claim on our sympathy and attention. We have no moral right to destroy good craftsmanship of past generations, but we do have a responsibility to future generations to pass along todays noteworthy buildings intact. The ballroom has its own entrance, stairs, elevator and therefore could be easily saved and happily used.
NEWS
June 18, 2011 | By Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - AARP, the powerful lobby for older Americans, was hammered Friday by fellow activists for refusing to oppose any and all cuts to Social Security benefits, a position the group says it has long held as a way to extend the life of the massive retirement and disability program. The group, which has 37 million members, adamantly opposes cutting Social Security benefits to help reduce the federal budget deficit, said David Certner, the organization's director of legislative policy.
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By George Will
Connoisseurs of democratic decadence can savor a variety of contemporary dystopias. Because familiarity breeds banality, Greece has become a boring horror. Japan, however, in its second generation of stagnation, is fascinating. Once, Japan bestrode the world. Now the Japanese buy more diapers for adults than for infants. America has its lowest birthrate since at least 1920; family formation and workforce participation have declined in tandem. But it has an energy surplus, the government-produced overhang of housing inventory is shrinking, and the average age of Americans' cars is an astonishing 10.8 years.
NEWS
November 1, 2004
Delran's plea for an open-space tax Delran is at a crossroads. Six years ago, council asked residents to support a local open-space tax, and it was defeated. Since then, residents have experienced high-density development and the negative impact such development has on our local school system and taxes. Thirteen other towns in Burlington County have local open-space taxes, and these towns have gone on to preserve precious land. This year Cinnaminson, Delanco, Shamong and Tabernacle also have open-space questions on their ballots.
NEWS
February 4, 1997
Imagine if it were illegal to save for your children's college tuition. Suppose you had to pay each year from cash on hand. Imagine being prohibited from buying a house until you had all the money for the purchase price. Imagine being forbidden to save or borrow to finance unforeseen expenses - a new roof or leaky plumbing or a car breakdown. It's fashionable to apply the strictures of home budgeting to the federal government. Witness the cliche, "A family has to live within its means.
NEWS
January 13, 2004 | By DAVID J. ROBERTS
AMERICA'S first MBA-president has shown remarkable skill in using other people's money. Whether it's massive tax cuts, no-bid contracts for Iraq reconstruction, farm subsidies or an expensive Medicare prescription drug plan, President Bush has delivered. But at what cost, and who ultimately pays? This largess is effectively being paid for with borrowed money. Couple huge spending increases, even in non-defense discretionary spending, with three massive tax cuts, and you have a recipe for long-term disaster.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 7, 2013 | By George Will
Connoisseurs of democratic decadence can savor a variety of contemporary dystopias. Because familiarity breeds banality, Greece has become a boring horror. Japan, however, in its second generation of stagnation, is fascinating. Once, Japan bestrode the world. Now the Japanese buy more diapers for adults than for infants. America has its lowest birthrate since at least 1920; family formation and workforce participation have declined in tandem. But it has an energy surplus, the government-produced overhang of housing inventory is shrinking, and the average age of Americans' cars is an astonishing 10.8 years.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Kevin Turner
Football has always been a big part of my life. It's a game of toughness and character that teaches important lessons about teamwork and responsibility. But I believe it's my duty to speak out about what has happened to me and many other football players. As I continue to battle amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, I hope to draw attention to the problem of concussions in professional football. I am just one of many former players who suffer from devastating brain and other neurological injuries - injuries that could have been prevented if the NFL had been honest about the risks.
SPORTS
August 9, 2012 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
LONDON - The rivalry with those varmints north of the border was finally on. The U.S. against Canada: Yuengling vs. Molson, states vs. provinces, the Red, White, and Blue vs. the Great White North. That was the feeling Monday night, as the Americans and Canadians waged a soccer war for the ages. It was physical, it was intense, it was emotional. It took a goal by Alex Morgan in injury time of overtime for the U.S. women to advance to the gold-medal game. Just 14 hours later, it was time for Round 2: the United States and Canada in the quarterfinals of the Olympic women's basketball tournament.
SPORTS
September 5, 2011 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Columnist
Well, that was a magical first half of the season for the Pittsburgh Pirates. The Buccos got a glimpse of first back in July, before fading (something they usually do in, oh, April or May). At least their fans have the yellowing clipping of the midsummer standings (or is it a screen-shot these days?) to show to future generations who don't believe it can be done. No so fast, though. Good times may still be in the offing for the future. Tough-nut Clint Hurdle is still the manager, and something tells us he won't be taking the Iron City's baseball status quo without a fight.
NEWS
June 18, 2011 | By Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - AARP, the powerful lobby for older Americans, was hammered Friday by fellow activists for refusing to oppose any and all cuts to Social Security benefits, a position the group says it has long held as a way to extend the life of the massive retirement and disability program. The group, which has 37 million members, adamantly opposes cutting Social Security benefits to help reduce the federal budget deficit, said David Certner, the organization's director of legislative policy.
BUSINESS
September 21, 2006 | By Joseph N. DiStefano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
State pension funds in Pennsylvania and New Jersey are among the U.S. investors bracing for losses due to bad bets on natural-gas futures by Amaranth Advisors L.L.C., one of the nation's largest hedge funds. Amaranth, which managed about $9 billion, told investors earlier this week that it expected losses of more than 35 percent because of a drop in natural-gas futures that took its trading desk by surprise. The loss is a black eye to the secretive hedge fund industry, which has boomed in recent years.
NEWS
September 18, 2006 | By Dante Zappala
James-Dante is going to be 12 this fall. He's started the sixth grade as a giant among boys. His back-to-school shoe size is 10?. He's taller than his mother; he weighs more than I do. By all estimates, he'll be a bigger man than his father. J.D. is my nephew, my brother's son. Sherwood, my brother, had always been larger than his contemporaries. He topped out at 6-4. He oscillated in weight from a hefty 240 to a post-boot camp 185. When he died, he was probably somewhere in the middle.
NEWS
November 26, 2005
Security deficit We've all heard about federal budget deficits and how they represent a shameful dumping of financial burdens on future generations. But there's another kind of deficit, more worrisome and potentially perilous for our posterity. I call it the national security deficit. We are accumulating it as I write, by signaling the murdering cadre of al-Qaeda and their ilk that the United States hasn't the resolve to withstand them. Daily their belief that we will fail and run away, that we have no stomach for armed conflict and the resulting casualties - as they claim we did in Vietnam, Lebanon and Somalia - may be confirmed.
NEWS
August 30, 2005
After reading about the Lazaretto Quarantine Station in Tinicum Township, I began thinking about my grandparents, who immigrated from Lithuania ("Township rescues historic site on Delaware," Aug. 22). They did not come from Europe to New York, but to Philadelphia. I think that if people could find out if their ancestors were at Lazaretto Station, they would be willing to donate money to help preserve this historic building. Are documents available to the general public to find out who came to America through Philadelphia ports and who was detained at this quarantine station?
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