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Future Leaders

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NEWS
August 3, 1994 | Inquirer photographs by Carlos Gonzalez
The Evolution of Dunk" was the focus, and two big stars were out at the Temple-R.W. Brown Community Center at 1701 N. 8th St. in North Philadelphia yesterday. The event was held to support the Mayor's Office of Community Services' Project FLOW (Future Leaders of the World).
NEWS
February 4, 2002
CHRIS McShane: Your characterization of the Wing Bowl makes it obvious that you do not understand this community. Stay home, Chris. You're about as Philly as a glass of chardonnay. Brett Wells, Audubon, Pa. Nakoa Ferrell, in defending Colin Powell's appearance on MTV, says the younger generation "are the future leaders of the world and have a right to be involved in political issues. " Have any of our "future leaders" ever considered Fox News, CNN, CNBC, MSNBC or C-SPAN?
NEWS
February 26, 2007
I WAS ENTHUSED by the Feb. 10 article on Mayor Street signing a bill toughening the city's curfew ordinance. This law must be put into effect to reduce youth violence and hold parents responsible. The children of this city should not be out in the streets at 11 and 12 at night. Mayor Street made an excellent statement when he said, "No good thing can happen to young people at that hour. " It fascinated me to know that 11 curfew centers are slated to open around the city this year, five by April and another six this summer.
NEWS
November 8, 2010
RE Kerith Gabriel's reference in the sports section to the assault of a fan at Beaver Stadium: I'm appalled. A Penn State fan wore Michigan colors and received a beating. Mr. Gabriel referred to the fan as stupid to don the garb, but last I checked, you should be able to root for anyone you choose without fear of harm. This at an institution of higher learning. The future leaders of America. Tragic. A so-called professional journalist places blame where freedom of choice should prevail.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
Camden's school district has been awarded nearly $500,000 in federal grant money aimed at improving American history instruction, officials announced Tuesday. Part of the Teaching American History Grant program, the funding is intended to foster student achievement by improving teachers' knowledge and understanding of American history. "Educating our future leaders is a critical component in our continued efforts to move Camden forward," said Mayor Dana L. Redd, who made the announcement with U.S. Sens.
NEWS
November 2, 2010
There is a concept in American letters known as "damning by faint praise" and that is exactly what happened in your article "Ackerman named top schools chief" (Oct. 22), which reported that Superintendent Arlene Ackerman had been selected by the Council of Great City Schools to receive its highest award. Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of Great City Schools, proclaimed that our superintendent clearly earned and richly deserves the highest individual award in urban education.
NEWS
May 4, 1998 | by Nicole Weisensee, Daily News Staff Writer
Police Commissioner John Timoney's first 55 days in office have been a dizzying string of 14-hour days, community meetings and staff reorganization. At the same time, he's been crafting a crime-fighting plan that he promises will change the way the Police Department does business. That plan was to be released this week, but has been delayed while he makes unspecified changes. "I actually did more than I thought I would do, but there's just more to be done," Timoney said.
NEWS
February 6, 1993 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
After delaying it for three weeks, a City Council committee yesterday decided to agree with a Rendell administration plan to spend $875,602 on an anti-gang program at 13 PHA projects. Irked that they hadn't been included in dividing the spoils, in this case a federal grant, members of the Appropriations Committee held up its approval in mid-January. But yesterday, after a series of private meetings, the committee approved the otherwise routine bill without even hearing from the administration.
NEWS
May 2, 1991 | by Kurt Heine, Daily News Staff Writer
In my day, we would have called this beefy college senior a jock, because of his short haircut and muscled appearance. But now, 14 years since I was in college, he seems pretty typical. He is much smarter than anybody I knew in college. But that's probably because he goes to Duke, which is supposed to be one of the nation's top universities, and I went to Penn State, which is distinguished mostly by football. He says he has trouble deciding what to do with his life, which is one of the things I can remember struggling with at his age. But he talks about other things that make me realize the future leaders of America are not like they were in my day. No, this well-moneyed campus is not a seedbed of intellectual discontent.
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Bill Reed, Kathy Boccella, and Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writers
Only a handful among the scores gathered at a Tuesday afternoon Mass in Center City had ever met Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, the incoming head of the Philadelphia Archdiocese. But one of those who knew the Denver prelate offered this advice: "Buckle your seat belts," said Rocco Palmo, who writes the widely read Catholic blog "Whispers in the Loggia" from South Philadelphia. "It's dramatic change. . . . East and West are literally East and West. " And the West, in this case, is Colorado, where Chaput led the church before being named Tuesday to succeed retiring Cardinal Justin Rigali.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 20, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Bill Reed, Kathy Boccella, and Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writers
Only a handful among the scores gathered at a Tuesday afternoon Mass in Center City had ever met Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, the incoming head of the Philadelphia Archdiocese. But one of those who knew the Denver prelate offered this advice: "Buckle your seat belts," said Rocco Palmo, who writes the widely read Catholic blog "Whispers in the Loggia" from South Philadelphia. "It's dramatic change. . . . East and West are literally East and West. " And the West, in this case, is Colorado, where Chaput led the church before being named Tuesday to succeed retiring Cardinal Justin Rigali.
NEWS
November 8, 2010
RE Kerith Gabriel's reference in the sports section to the assault of a fan at Beaver Stadium: I'm appalled. A Penn State fan wore Michigan colors and received a beating. Mr. Gabriel referred to the fan as stupid to don the garb, but last I checked, you should be able to root for anyone you choose without fear of harm. This at an institution of higher learning. The future leaders of America. Tragic. A so-called professional journalist places blame where freedom of choice should prevail.
NEWS
November 2, 2010
There is a concept in American letters known as "damning by faint praise" and that is exactly what happened in your article "Ackerman named top schools chief" (Oct. 22), which reported that Superintendent Arlene Ackerman had been selected by the Council of Great City Schools to receive its highest award. Michael Casserly, executive director of the Council of Great City Schools, proclaimed that our superintendent clearly earned and richly deserves the highest individual award in urban education.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
Camden's school district has been awarded nearly $500,000 in federal grant money aimed at improving American history instruction, officials announced Tuesday. Part of the Teaching American History Grant program, the funding is intended to foster student achievement by improving teachers' knowledge and understanding of American history. "Educating our future leaders is a critical component in our continued efforts to move Camden forward," said Mayor Dana L. Redd, who made the announcement with U.S. Sens.
NEWS
December 16, 2008 | By Howard Kunreuther and Michael Useem
With Congress balking at a bailout, General Motors soon could be driven into the dustbin of history. How did an icon of American business reach such a disastrous state? For an answer, it's instructive to consider natural disasters - which, like corporate calamities, have been particularly devastating to the country in recent years. Hurricane Katrina killed 1,300 people and forced 1.5 million from their homes. If GM declares bankruptcy, hundreds of thousands will lose their jobs, and many of them could lose their homes, too. Whether the risk at hand is a natural calamity or a corporate disaster, we see parallel lessons for those most responsible for avoiding the worst.
NEWS
April 3, 2007 | By Nilda Ruiz
Latinos are in the news, but often as voiceless victims, criminals or protesters. We are talked about, but it is extremely rare, particularly in mainstream media, that we are talked to. The constant drone of cable analysts and pundits on immigration, few of whom are Latino themselves, shed little light on the accomplishments and goals of millions of citizens of Hispanic origin. Like most Americans, Latinos work hard for themselves, their children, and their families' futures. Immigration is important and needs to be revamped in the United States because what we have is not working.
NEWS
February 26, 2007
I WAS ENTHUSED by the Feb. 10 article on Mayor Street signing a bill toughening the city's curfew ordinance. This law must be put into effect to reduce youth violence and hold parents responsible. The children of this city should not be out in the streets at 11 and 12 at night. Mayor Street made an excellent statement when he said, "No good thing can happen to young people at that hour. " It fascinated me to know that 11 curfew centers are slated to open around the city this year, five by April and another six this summer.
NEWS
October 28, 2005 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Her license plate - "FUTURO" - might go unnoticed by many, but Shirley Grover specifically asked for it when she moved back to the United States from Italy earlier this year. It means future in Italian, and that word figures heavily in Grover's life now. She's the new principal of the High School of the Future, the Philadelphia School District's $62 million school being developed in partnership with Microsoft Corp. Billed as a prototype for the best and most cost-effective use of technology in education, the school going up in Fairmount Park near the Philadelphia Zoo has drawn international attention even though it's almost a year away from opening.
NEWS
April 7, 2005 | By Elizabeth Landau
In the days of yore, when male (all) Princeton students wore suits and bow ties to class and courted young ladies at Vassar, there were no "background checks. " A promising young man would introduce himself to a striking blonde with a bob and tell her a life story that she would have little way of verifying. Political tycoon or organic chemistry innovator, Southern Republican or Canadian chain-smoker, accomplished senior or too-cool-for-you freshman - Princetonians could make of themselves whatever they chose when they introduced themselves.
BUSINESS
November 8, 2003 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The pigeon-droppings question gets them every time. "They usually don't know that one," said David Seltzer, the master of ceremonies for this week's Philadelphia trivia contest hosted by Leadership Inc. for 110 of Philadelphia's top or up-and-coming business and nonprofit leaders. Maybe your question is what pigeon droppings have to do with power in the city, with grooming rising executives to assume the mantle of civic leadership, to sit on boards, to raise money, to apply business acumen to bettering society.
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