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Gaelic Football

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NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
Every Tuesday and Thursday evening since March, they have gathered on the football field behind the Drexel Hill Middle School to sharpen their playing skills. People running on the cinder track surrounding the field shake their heads in confusion as the team, the Young Irelands, goes through its paces, handling a round ball much like a soccer ball with their hands and feet. The passersby look as if they are watching a sport from another planet. Actually, it's only from another country.
NEWS
July 17, 2008 | By Ira Josephs FOR THE INQUIRER
Gaelic football has been around since the 17th century and today, the Gaelic football mom who drives a minivan is right around the corner. While Gaelic football gained a following in the United States over the last century, it was played mostly in the Irish communities of major cities. But it has arrived in the suburbs of Chester County in a big way. The Continental Youth Championships will be played here next week, from next Thursday to July 27, at the Greater Chester Valley Soccer Association's complex in Willistown.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the evening practice at the middle school, a sweaty Sean McCormick drew his Gaelic football team together and broke the bad news over swigs of Gatorade: This season would be his last as coach of the Young Irelanders. He wasn't losing his will to win or his love for Gaelic football, Ireland's national sport, which blends elements of soccer, rugby, American football, volleyball and basketball. Rather, he was losing his players - five of the starting 13 last season - to reverse migration.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | By Tim Panaccio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ye champions of fair Lusks and ye of Swords, View well this ball, the present of your lords, To outward view, three folds of bullock's hide, With leather thongs bound fast on every side, A mass of finest hay concealed from sight, Conspire at once to make it firm and light. - Unidentified master of ceremonies. The words were spoken before the 1721 match between the Lusks and Swords in Northern Ireland. By then, Gaelic football was already 194 years old. In its ancient form, the sport's essential element was violence, and its field of play was miles - not yards.
SPORTS
September 19, 2004 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sitting there, squeezed in tight between soccer balls and orange drill cones, Kevin Tangney would think during those car rides to games with his family each Saturday and Sunday afternoon. He would think about becoming a professional soccer player, about being a star, about scoring the winning goal in a championship game. Now the 6-foot-1, 155-pound senior at Council Rock North is closer to realizing his dreams. He is headed to the University of Maryland after giving the school an oral commitment.
SPORTS
July 20, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Paul McGinley picked an inopportune time to lead the British Open. McGinley, a little-known, 29-year-old Irishman who turned to golf after he ruined a knee playing Gaelic football, shot a 6-under-par 65 with a hole-in-one yesterday to share the second-round lead with American Tom Lehman. The problem is the guy 1 shot back - Jack Nicklaus. As McGinley was posting a two-round total of 8-under 134, golf's greatest player was pulling an even bigger surprise, following a 69 with a 66 to stand 1 shot off the lead after his best back-to-back opening rounds in a major in 15 years.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | Daily News wire services
AFGHANISTAN REBELS ASSAULT FLEEING RUSSIANS Rebels ignored a temporary truce designed to give diplomats a chance to leave and fired a salvo of rockets today into Kabul's airport, setting ablaze a plane sent to evacuate Russian diplomats and their families from the besieged capital. Four Russian commandos aboard the plane were injured. Two military transport planes ferried 120 Russian embassy staffers, their wives and children safely out of Kabul. Moscow decided yesterday to close its mission in Kabul after at least 14 rebel rockets slammed into the embassy in the morning, wounding two technical personnel.
NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the usual for the tightly knit Irish and Irish- American community in the area - tragedy strikes, the phones ring, and fund-raising begins. This time, it was for Charlie Dunlop of Havertown. The 46-year-old electrician, who had emigrated from Northern Ireland, dropped dead in his kitchen. His wife and young son walked in to find Dunlop sprawled on the floor. For many in the Irish community and beyond, Charlie Dunlop's death more than a year ago felt like a direct hit. The cliche seemed to fit - everybody knew Charlie.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is an Upper Darby pub with no name where men gather three deep at the bar, drink watery American beer in Irish pint glasses, argue about the last Gaelic football game and keep a watchful eye for agents of the U.S. government. Whenever the front door opens, the conversation stops. The drinking stops. The men stare hard into their beers. They know the visitor could be from the immigration service and the drink could be their last in America. Add the Irish to the swelling tide of illegal immigrants crossing into this country - and anxiously awaiting changes in U.S. immigration laws that go into effect Tuesday.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters.)
Gary Hart surfaced at a football match in Ireland yesterday but managed to avoid questions about what role he might play in the 1988 presidential election. Hart's former campaign manager, William Dixon, said in a radio interview in Madison, Wis., Thursday that friends and family were urging Hart to renew his campaign for the Democratic nomination. "I think he's likely to get back in the presidential race in the next 30 to 60 days," Dixon said. But another former aide, William Shore.
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NEWS
April 4, 2013 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
It was the usual for the tightly knit Irish and Irish- American community in the area - tragedy strikes, the phones ring, and fund-raising begins. This time, it was for Charlie Dunlop of Havertown. The 46-year-old electrician, who had emigrated from Northern Ireland, dropped dead in his kitchen. His wife and young son walked in to find Dunlop sprawled on the floor. For many in the Irish community and beyond, Charlie Dunlop's death more than a year ago felt like a direct hit. The cliche seemed to fit - everybody knew Charlie.
NEWS
July 17, 2008 | By Ira Josephs FOR THE INQUIRER
Gaelic football has been around since the 17th century and today, the Gaelic football mom who drives a minivan is right around the corner. While Gaelic football gained a following in the United States over the last century, it was played mostly in the Irish communities of major cities. But it has arrived in the suburbs of Chester County in a big way. The Continental Youth Championships will be played here next week, from next Thursday to July 27, at the Greater Chester Valley Soccer Association's complex in Willistown.
SPORTS
September 19, 2004 | By Joe Santoliquito INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Sitting there, squeezed in tight between soccer balls and orange drill cones, Kevin Tangney would think during those car rides to games with his family each Saturday and Sunday afternoon. He would think about becoming a professional soccer player, about being a star, about scoring the winning goal in a championship game. Now the 6-foot-1, 155-pound senior at Council Rock North is closer to realizing his dreams. He is headed to the University of Maryland after giving the school an oral commitment.
NEWS
August 26, 1999 | By Michael Stoll, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
After the evening practice at the middle school, a sweaty Sean McCormick drew his Gaelic football team together and broke the bad news over swigs of Gatorade: This season would be his last as coach of the Young Irelanders. He wasn't losing his will to win or his love for Gaelic football, Ireland's national sport, which blends elements of soccer, rugby, American football, volleyball and basketball. Rather, he was losing his players - five of the starting 13 last season - to reverse migration.
SPORTS
July 20, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Paul McGinley picked an inopportune time to lead the British Open. McGinley, a little-known, 29-year-old Irishman who turned to golf after he ruined a knee playing Gaelic football, shot a 6-under-par 65 with a hole-in-one yesterday to share the second-round lead with American Tom Lehman. The problem is the guy 1 shot back - Jack Nicklaus. As McGinley was posting a two-round total of 8-under 134, golf's greatest player was pulling an even bigger surprise, following a 69 with a 66 to stand 1 shot off the lead after his best back-to-back opening rounds in a major in 15 years.
NEWS
August 28, 1992 | Daily News wire services
AFGHANISTAN REBELS ASSAULT FLEEING RUSSIANS Rebels ignored a temporary truce designed to give diplomats a chance to leave and fired a salvo of rockets today into Kabul's airport, setting ablaze a plane sent to evacuate Russian diplomats and their families from the besieged capital. Four Russian commandos aboard the plane were injured. Two military transport planes ferried 120 Russian embassy staffers, their wives and children safely out of Kabul. Moscow decided yesterday to close its mission in Kabul after at least 14 rebel rockets slammed into the embassy in the morning, wounding two technical personnel.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | By John Corr, Inquirer Staff Writer
"Charles Barkley is a fine lad, after all," said one. "With a wonderful tendency toward disruption," said another. This line of reasoning was one of the few that would not be disputed this chilly spring evening as some of the regulars settled in for an hour or so of convivial and contentious chatter at Pat Rous' homey little pub on Pearse Street. Rous' place is one of the best in Ireland for a bit of gab about basketball and, with any luck, the conversation will drift eventually to the group of exuberant Philadelphians that has sort of adopted Ballina, its basketball team and the whole improbable idea of professional roundball in Ireland.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | By Bill Doherty, Special to The Inquirer
Every Tuesday and Thursday evening since March, they have gathered on the football field behind the Drexel Hill Middle School to sharpen their playing skills. People running on the cinder track surrounding the field shake their heads in confusion as the team, the Young Irelands, goes through its paces, handling a round ball much like a soccer ball with their hands and feet. The passersby look as if they are watching a sport from another planet. Actually, it's only from another country.
NEWS
August 24, 1987 | By Mark Butler, Inquirer Staff Writer (Contributing to this report were the Associated Press, United Press International and Reuters.)
Gary Hart surfaced at a football match in Ireland yesterday but managed to avoid questions about what role he might play in the 1988 presidential election. Hart's former campaign manager, William Dixon, said in a radio interview in Madison, Wis., Thursday that friends and family were urging Hart to renew his campaign for the Democratic nomination. "I think he's likely to get back in the presidential race in the next 30 to 60 days," Dixon said. But another former aide, William Shore.
NEWS
May 2, 1987 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Staff Writer
There is an Upper Darby pub with no name where men gather three deep at the bar, drink watery American beer in Irish pint glasses, argue about the last Gaelic football game and keep a watchful eye for agents of the U.S. government. Whenever the front door opens, the conversation stops. The drinking stops. The men stare hard into their beers. They know the visitor could be from the immigration service and the drink could be their last in America. Add the Irish to the swelling tide of illegal immigrants crossing into this country - and anxiously awaiting changes in U.S. immigration laws that go into effect Tuesday.
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