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Gagliardi

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NEWS
April 24, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer
HIS OWN lawyer was worried that Michael Lane - a saucy, outspoken South Philly man - would curse on the stand. It's not as if Lane didn't have cause. To begin with, Lane, owner of the local restaurant chain Steak' Em Up, never thought the lawsuit against him would make it to federal court. In fact, he thought it was a gag when he received a cease-and-desist letter from the owners of Steak-umm, a brand of thinly sliced frozen steak based outside Reading. The letter threatened Lane with a trademark-infringement suit if he didn't change the name of his chain within 24 hours.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When a state-appointed task force was dispatched to Camden schools a year ago, the retired educators who made up the team found to no one's surprise that it was a district with a lot of problems. Outdated textbooks. An unfocused curriculum. Uncertified teachers and administrators. Low test scores. A high dropout rate. A year later, the state says it has laid the foundation for Camden's recovery, while others say the task force has fingered the obvious problems without providing the help to resolve them.
NEWS
June 16, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The man appointed yesterday to lead a review of the Camden school system readily admits that he knows little about the place where, starting this summer, he will spend almost every workday for at least several months. But there is no question that he knows school systems. Vito A. Gagliardi, 60, a former Union County schools superintendent, has more than 30 years of experience in New Jersey as a teacher and an administrator. He also was a special education adviser to State Senate President Donald T. DiFrancesco (R., Union)
NEWS
November 6, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vito A. Gagliardi Jr. is the hired gun for Shore towns grappling with school-tax issues. Seaside Park, Cape May, Long Beach Township, and Beach Haven all have retained the lawyer from Morristown, N.J., to help them withdraw from regional school districts, dissolve the districts, or change their funding mechanisms. As home prices have soared, the Shore towns are paying what some say are a disproportionate share of the costs in regional school districts. Change won't be easy, says Gagliardi, who litigated cases that led to the dissolution of two regional school districts in New Jersey in the last decade.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey Education Commissioner Vito A. Gagliardi yesterday said a state task force assigned to the Camden school system would remain indefinitely, and he urged school officials to work with the panel and "stop pointing the finger at Trenton. " Gagliardi cited a state report, released yesterday, that said that while the beleaguered school district had made improvements since the oversight team was appointed in 1999 to help turn it around, more work was needed. "They did make some progress," Gagliardi said in an interview.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | By Ralph Cipriano and George Anastasia, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. contributed to this article
On Tuesday night, two masked men walked into a corner grocery store in South Philadelphia, drew their guns, and asked the wrong guy to open the cash register. Sgt. Dennis Gagliardi. Gagliardi, a plainclothes officer who had stopped in for a soda, pulled his gun from his holster and fired four shots, striking one gunman in the neck. The two would-be robbers ran out of Rob's Place, at 15th and Moore, pursued by store owner Robert Crociante and Gagliardi, who called on his police radio for backup.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | By Ralph Cipriano, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
George McCloskey says he can't remember what he had for dinner. He gets lost in Kmart. He's afraid to get into a car. The 49-year-old forklift operator hasn't been the same since he suffered what his doctors call "post-traumatic brain injury" in a head-on collision May 7 at the intersection of Front Street and the southbound entrance to Interstate 95. McCloskey can't remember what happened that day, but he hasn't forgotten how dangerous the...
NEWS
March 29, 1994 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Ask John Gagliardi, owner of a hair salon, if he supports universal health care, and he offers an unqualified yes. But Gagliardi, president of the Collingswood Business and Professional Association, representing about 125 ventures, feels just as strongly that the Clinton administration's plan for an employer-paid health system could bankrupt small businesses such as his own. So when Secretary of Labor Robert Reich began fielding questions during...
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | By W. Steven Barnett and Cecilia Zalkind
Three years ago, the New Jersey Supreme Court directed the state to ensure that all children in the state's most disadvantaged school districts receive a well-planned, high-quality preschool education. The court recognized that unless these children could enter school ready to learn, they had little hope of benefiting from reforms in kindergarten through 12th grade. Unfortunately, an evaluation by the Rutgers University Center for Early Education Research of the state's implementation of that court order in the long-running Abbott v. Burke case shows that the state has disregarded the rights of its most vulnerable residents and shattered their dreams for a better future.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Eugenio "Gene" Gagliardi, 90, who left his native Italy in 1922 with less than $20 in his pocket and built a local meat processing business that he eventually sold for $20 million, died Saturday at Lankenau Hospital. He was a resident of Lower Merion Township. "He was a self-made person," his son Ralph said. "He made the most of the opportunity he was given in this country. His work ethic was unbelievable. " Mr. Gagliardi transformed Gagliardi Bros., a family butcher shop in West Philadelphia, into a meat processing plant whose products included Steak-Umms, a frozen, wafer-thin sandwich steak.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | BY STEPHANIE FARR, Daily News Staff Writer
HIS OWN lawyer was worried that Michael Lane - a saucy, outspoken South Philly man - would curse on the stand. It's not as if Lane didn't have cause. To begin with, Lane, owner of the local restaurant chain Steak' Em Up, never thought the lawsuit against him would make it to federal court. In fact, he thought it was a gag when he received a cease-and-desist letter from the owners of Steak-umm, a brand of thinly sliced frozen steak based outside Reading. The letter threatened Lane with a trademark-infringement suit if he didn't change the name of his chain within 24 hours.
SPORTS
January 24, 2012 | BY BERNARD FERNANDEZ, fernanb@phillynews.com
THE OBITUARIES have it wrong. Joe Paterno, the Penn State coaching legend who was 85 when he died Sunday morning of complications from lung cancer, was not the last dinosaur of his profession. He was not the last of his kind. In Collegeville, Minn., a picturesque hamlet located 70 miles northwest of Minneapolis, there is someone whose accomplishments as a football coach and as a nurturing mentor to his players rival that of JoePa, and in some instances are even more astounding.
NEWS
November 6, 2005 | By Bob Fernandez INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Vito A. Gagliardi Jr. is the hired gun for Shore towns grappling with school-tax issues. Seaside Park, Cape May, Long Beach Township, and Beach Haven all have retained the lawyer from Morristown, N.J., to help them withdraw from regional school districts, dissolve the districts, or change their funding mechanisms. As home prices have soared, the Shore towns are paying what some say are a disproportionate share of the costs in regional school districts. Change won't be easy, says Gagliardi, who litigated cases that led to the dissolution of two regional school districts in New Jersey in the last decade.
NEWS
May 28, 2005 | By George Anastasia INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Reputed Trenton mob associate Anthony "Tony Gags" Gagliardi, who opted to serve as his own defense attorney, was convicted of federal cocaine-trafficking charges yesterday following a weeklong trial in U.S. District Court in Philadelphia. Gagliardi, 52, was found guilty of two of the four counts in the case and faces a mandatory minimum 10-year sentence because of a prior conviction for heroin trafficking, according to Assistant U.S. Attorney Barry Gross. Gross prosecuted the case along with Erik L. Olsen, the chief deputy attorney general in the Organized Crime Section of the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office.
NEWS
November 21, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Chester County voting officials reversed the outcome of a closely contested supervisors race here after counting 64 missing ballots. With the missing ballots, Louis J. Gagliardi, the endorsed Republican candidate, fended off a well-organized write-in campaign from incumbent Brian M. Smith by 14 votes. Smith, who could not be reached for comment, has five days to challenge the results. The ballots were not counted on election night because they were put in the wrong pile, said Sue Hillenbrand, a supervisor in the county's Department of Voter Services.
NEWS
November 6, 2003 | By Benjamin Y. Lowe INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Thornbury Township supervisor was reelected Tuesday, thanks to a well-organized write-in campaign. Preliminary results indicate that incumbent Brian Smith narrowly won a rematch that pitted him against challenger Louis J. Gagliardi, who defeated Smith by 24 votes in May's Republican primary. On Tuesday, Smith, 29, beat his opponent by 15 votes - but that could change when Chester County voting officials begin examining ballots on Friday. Gagliardi, 39, said he had not decided whether to challenge the results.
NEWS
August 30, 2001 | By Melanie Burney INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
New Jersey Education Commissioner Vito A. Gagliardi yesterday said a state task force assigned to the Camden school system would remain indefinitely, and he urged school officials to work with the panel and "stop pointing the finger at Trenton. " Gagliardi cited a state report, released yesterday, that said that while the beleaguered school district had made improvements since the oversight team was appointed in 1999 to help turn it around, more work was needed. "They did make some progress," Gagliardi said in an interview.
NEWS
June 12, 2001 | By W. Steven Barnett and Cecilia Zalkind
Three years ago, the New Jersey Supreme Court directed the state to ensure that all children in the state's most disadvantaged school districts receive a well-planned, high-quality preschool education. The court recognized that unless these children could enter school ready to learn, they had little hope of benefiting from reforms in kindergarten through 12th grade. Unfortunately, an evaluation by the Rutgers University Center for Early Education Research of the state's implementation of that court order in the long-running Abbott v. Burke case shows that the state has disregarded the rights of its most vulnerable residents and shattered their dreams for a better future.
NEWS
July 18, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When a state-appointed task force was dispatched to Camden schools a year ago, the retired educators who made up the team found to no one's surprise that it was a district with a lot of problems. Outdated textbooks. An unfocused curriculum. Uncertified teachers and administrators. Low test scores. A high dropout rate. A year later, the state says it has laid the foundation for Camden's recovery, while others say the task force has fingered the obvious problems without providing the help to resolve them.
NEWS
July 13, 2000 | By Eugene Kiely, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A year after he was sent to the troubled Camden School District, Vito Gagliardi has resigned as head of a state-appointed task force, saying the job was too demanding. Gagliardi, a retired superintendent of schools in Union County, has been a consultant to the state for three years. He said he had hoped to work only one year with the state but kept accepting assignments, including the one in Camden. "I'm retired," he said. "I wasn't looking to work full time, and, quite honestly, that Camden project is not only full time, I see it as at least a five- to maybe 10-year project in order for it to be done correctly.
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