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Galileo

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NEWS
September 28, 2003
Last Sunday, at 30 miles per second, the space probe Galileo rammed into the atmosphere of Jupiter and promptly vaporized. To the very end, until all went black, this doughty little satellite beamed back information. It didn't start out well. Galileo was launched in October 1989, a starved time for space exploration. Political wrangling and more than a decade of delays had savaged a once-ambitious project: By the time the astronauts of the shuttle Atlantis shoved it overboard, much of Galileo's technology was already obsolete.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2007 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"Unhappy is the land that needs a hero," Galileo says after his famous recantation, and the same could be said of a play. One of the strengths of The Life of Galileo, in a handsome, provocative production at the Wilma Theatre, is that Brecht refuses to provide us with a hero, denying us an easy, consolatory resolution. Galileo was the first scientist to turn a telescope on the "heavens," finding the evidence to prove Copernicus right: The Earth does move around the sun. The Roman Catholic Church, unwilling to relinquish man's central place in God's cosmos, threatened Galileo - other scientists had been sent to the stake before.
LIVING
July 15, 1996 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The black-and-white pictures were as detailed as patches of Earth seen from an airplane window, but the pocked and crack-riddled landscape belonged to Jupiter's largest moon, Ganymede, an icy globe millions of miles away. The pictures, the first beamed back from the Galileo spacecraft, inspired joyous exclamations from scientists when they were released last week. "I was dumbfounded by the incredible detail we were able to see," said James Head, a planetary scientist from Brown University.
NEWS
May 24, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS Pet of the Week is Galileo, a pit-bull terrier mix, about 1-to-2 years old, at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Galileo's just a big, goofy, and playful puppy. He can live with other dogs and children, but we don't know about cats. He would benefit from basic obedience training. To adopt Galileo, contact PAWS at adoptions@phillypaws.org or 215-545-9600, ext. 69 or 70 prior to visiting the shelter. Please provide his tag number A31423033 when inquiring. A $150 fee includes sterilization, vaccines, and micro-chipping.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Galileo the artist, or Galileo the scientist? Burlington County College students have been enlisted to test the findings of one of the world's great scientists. Greg Perugini, a physics lecturer, had been skeptical of the Italian astronomer's paintings of the moon in his 1610 Sidereus Nuncius - "Starry Messenger" - famous for the use of a telescope for scientific observation. Perugini didn't accuse the father of modern astronomy of lying, exactly. But he wasn't sure Galileo's detailed paintings were exactly true.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1989 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun beat down hard on the gleaming white foredeck of the Galileo as Capt. Zerassimos Andrianatos of Greece instructed sailor Ashraf Ali of Bangladesh to keep the compass heading on 114 degrees south-southeast. Inside the pilothouse, where officer-in-charge Peter Skilotiannis stood watch, Ali spun the big stainless steel wheel one time gently to starboard, and the Galileo nosed deeper into the cobalt-colored expanse of open Atlantic - leaving the Chesapeake Bay, and the cares of shore-bound living, behind at seven knots.
NEWS
June 1, 2009 | By Eric Plumer
The Ron Howard movie Angels and Demons, based on the book by Dan Brown, has drawn Catholic Church supporters and critics out for another science-vs.-religion slugfest in the media. Brown's work refers to the Vatican's harsh treatment of Galileo for his insistence that the Earth revolves around the sun. Church supporters say that Vatican officials never tortured Galileo to make him renounce his claim, and that they rejected it because he lacked sufficient evidence. Critics counter that the Vatican was concerned only with making Galileo an example to those who would dare challenge its authority.
FOOD
March 12, 1995 | By Elaine Tait, INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
As recently as a decade ago, we Philadelphians still had a reputation for avoiding any restaurant that was either above or below street level. The success of Upstares at Varalli (on the second floor at Broad and Locust) and Michels (down a few steps at the Latham at 17th and Walnut) suggests that locals of the current fitness generation have no such hangups. Nonetheless, Galileo's isn't taking any chances. The restaurant occupies a second-floor location at 17th and Spruce, but when a first-floor room is completed, dining is scheduled to move downstairs and the current space will become a late-night room offering a light menu and musical entertainment.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1995 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
Of all the plays by the great modernist Bertolt Brecht, The Life of Galileo may be the least "Brechtian. " The playwright himself called it "technically . . . a large step backwards," and indeed it seems informed not by the arm's-length chilliness usually associated with Brecht but by the propulsive sweep of the chronicle plays of the 16th century. Charles Laughton, its first English translator, seriously compared it with the works of Shakespeare. Yes, Brecht tricked up his play with titles and pseudo-folk ditties preceding each of its dozen-plus scenes, and he couldn't resist inserting a metaphorical puppet pageant about two-thirds of the way through.
NEWS
April 10, 1997 | By Faye Flam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Making a giant step in the search for life beyond Earth, NASA scientists yesterday announced the discovery of an extraterrestrial ocean buried beneath the frozen surface of Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter. Liquid water is the key ingredient for life as we know it. While the NASA scientists haven't detected any life yet, they say it stands a good chance of existing in this distant ocean. A further mission could very well find something alive. Evidence for the ocean came from finely detailed pictures of Europa's alien landscape just beamed back from the Galileo spacecraft.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 2016
THE DAILY NEWS Pet of the Week is Galileo, a pit-bull terrier mix, about 1-to-2 years old, at the Philadelphia Animal Welfare Society. Galileo's just a big, goofy, and playful puppy. He can live with other dogs and children, but we don't know about cats. He would benefit from basic obedience training. To adopt Galileo, contact PAWS at adoptions@phillypaws.org or 215-545-9600, ext. 69 or 70 prior to visiting the shelter. Please provide his tag number A31423033 when inquiring. A $150 fee includes sterilization, vaccines, and micro-chipping.
NEWS
April 23, 2016
By Larry Dubinski Until the Kepler space telescope was launched in 2009, planets beyond our solar system seemed to be few and far between. But since then, Kepler has disproved that belief in spectacular fashion, confirming over a thousand new worlds orbiting other stars in our galaxy - some of which may even be Earth-like planets harboring life. Much like Apollo 8's famous "Earth rise" photograph, showing a lonely, blue Earth rising above the stark lunar landscape, the Kepler instrument has profoundly changed our perspective of humanity's place in the universe.
SPORTS
November 11, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer jneiburg@phillynews.com
THE QUESTION was barely out of a reporter's mouth before Dave Hakstol started his answer. The first-year Flyers coach probably could have predicted he'd be asked about his goaltending situation Monday, given the recent play of Michal Neuvirth, who was signed this offseason to back up Steve Mason. Neuvirth capped off a great week with his NHL-leading third shutout of the season in a win over Winnipeg Saturday. With a .945 save percentage - aided by 45 stops in Edmonton last Tuesday - he entered Monday tied atop the league with Jake Allen and some guy named Henrik Lundqvist.
NEWS
May 12, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
Galileo the artist, or Galileo the scientist? Burlington County College students have been enlisted to test the findings of one of the world's great scientists. Greg Perugini, a physics lecturer, had been skeptical of the Italian astronomer's paintings of the moon in his 1610 Sidereus Nuncius - "Starry Messenger" - famous for the use of a telescope for scientific observation. Perugini didn't accuse the father of modern astronomy of lying, exactly. But he wasn't sure Galileo's detailed paintings were exactly true.
NEWS
January 17, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
Fans of Mel Brooks and John Waters will love We Will Rock You , now in a touring production at the Academy of Music. Fans of Queen's music, not so much. As someone who likes both Brooks' comedies and Queen's music, I can tell you the two styles don't mix well, at least not in Ben Elton's book. The storyline draws on Star Wars , 1984 , A Clockwork Orange , and The Matrix . "Sometime in the future," tormented teenager Galileo (Brian Justin Crum) lives in a totalitarian state called the iPlanet, where everyone plugs into Globalsoft - a virtual world of video games, advertisements, and pop music.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2012 | By Victoria Donohoe, For The Inquirer
Michael Morrill, a prominent Pittsburgh abstract painter, is introduced at Seraphin Gallery in his first Philadelphia solo. A teacher of studio art at the University of Pittsburgh, the Yale-trained Morrill became an artist when the reductive aesthetic of the 1970s, not the more austere minimalism of the 1960s, was emerging and combining itself with painterly enrichment - something that characterizes his distinctive handling of this method. I'd say Morrill keeps half a foot in the reductive camp, while his paintings emphasize their expressive option with brilliance.
NEWS
September 11, 2009 | By Sam Wood INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For five months, the telescope built by the master himself served as the centerpiece of the Franklin Institute's summer exhibition "Galileo, the Medici and the Age of Astronomy. " In that span - which Derrick Pitts, the institute's chief astronomer, described as "a semi-religious experience" - the museum's attendance swelled beyond expectations. Though museum-goers were not allowed to handle the priceless artifact, it did not take much imagination to put themselves in the 17th-century scientist's shoes.
NEWS
June 1, 2009 | By Eric Plumer
The Ron Howard movie Angels and Demons, based on the book by Dan Brown, has drawn Catholic Church supporters and critics out for another science-vs.-religion slugfest in the media. Brown's work refers to the Vatican's harsh treatment of Galileo for his insistence that the Earth revolves around the sun. Church supporters say that Vatican officials never tortured Galileo to make him renounce his claim, and that they rejected it because he lacked sufficient evidence. Critics counter that the Vatican was concerned only with making Galileo an example to those who would dare challenge its authority.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Christopher Yasiejko FOR THE INQUIRER
The Italian museum's director pulled out a stack of letters and, one by one, laid them atop his desk at the Institute and Museum of the History of Science in Florence. It was late 2007 and appeals were pouring in from museums in China, Korea, Germany, New York, Chicago, and a host of cities around the globe, though the International Year of Astronomy was still more than a year away. "Tutti vogliono il mio telescopio," Paolo Galluzzi said. "Everyone wants my telescope," the only remaining functional telescope made by Galileo Galilei, whom Albert Einstein called "the father of modern physics - indeed, of modern science altogether.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When NASA launched a new space telescope called Kepler this year, mankind took another step in a quest that started 400 years ago with two eyeglass lenses and a piece of lead pipe. It was in 1609 that mathematics professor Galileo Galilei pointed his homemade telescope skyward and saw what looked like mountains on the moon and other wonders no one had imagined. His instrument - marginally more powerful than a cheap pair of modern binoculars - enabled him to shatter cosmological dogma as he carefully catalogued the phases of Venus, the moons of Jupiter, and the stars of the Milky Way. Starting Saturday, visitors to the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia can see one of two surviving original telescopes that allowed Galileo to open the heavens to science - and ultimately led to his house arrest for heresy.
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