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BUSINESS
February 8, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - The former Atlantic City Hilton Casino, renamed ACH Casino Resort last year, is now the Atlantic Club. The casino's new name and business strategy were unveiled Tuesday by Michael Frawley, Atlantic Club's chief operating officer, who said the casino wants to be "the locals casino" in the market as it seeks to reestablish itself. "This isn't where you take your wife on her birthday. This is where you take your wife on a Wednesday," Frawley said matter-of-factly inside his office here.
NEWS
September 20, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
On the casino battleground that is the Delaware River waterfront, this is what victory looks like: A school of cool blue lamps hovering over a brand-new blackjack table, surrounded by a metal sea of blinking slot machines, with the music of Smash Mouth on the sound system: "All that glitters is gold. ... " The much-debated, long-delayed SugarHouse Casino is set to open Thursday, the first gambling hall in Philadelphia. All that's left is to cut a ribbon. That reality holds joy or sadness for the people, neighborhood groups, and city organizations that have for years fought for or against the coming of the casino.
NEWS
July 3, 1997 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You can be darn sure there were no seagulls in Dodge City. No sand castles either. And the stagecoach wasn't followed, as it was yesterday on the Boardwalk, by Carlos Velez and his wondrous Madvac to suck up the horse deposits. But the public seemed to pay no mind to the native - and practical - touches of Atlantic City 1997 yesterday at the grand opening of the Wild Wild West Casino. The $110 million addition to Hilton Hotel Corp.'s Bally's Park Place is the first themed gambling hall in this seaside town that hopes to broaden its appeal beyond day-trippers to vacationing families.
NEWS
June 11, 1987 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
New York developer Donald Trump won state permission yesterday to buy control of Atlantic City's oldest casino, despite some lingering questions about his expanding territory in the seaside city. At the end of a lengthy hearing, members of the state Casino Control Commission voted unanimously to approve Trump's purchase of a controlling interest in Resorts International Inc., the company that brought gambling to the Boardwalk more than nine years ago. But the approval came with the condition that Trump, the owner of two other Atlantic City casinos, sell or close one of the two casinos that he will acquire along with Resorts - the Resorts International Casino Hotel and the still-unfinished Taj Mahal casino.
NEWS
June 6, 2010 | By Monica Yant Kinney, Inquirer Columnist
Out of habit, I inhale deeply, preparing for the worst as I walk into Delaware Park Casino, near Wilmington. But inside, the olfactory assault is unlike anything I've ever whiffed in a gambling hall. It's deliciously decadent, so sweet I can practically feel myself gaining weight just trying to place the scent - vanilla? - wafting from the bakery/ice cream parlor next to the player services counter. You have to smell it to believe it , Mike Miller Jr. insisted after inviting me on a road trip to the casino, where he and his friends regularly deposit part of their pension checks.
NEWS
February 25, 2012 | By Wayne Parry, Associated Press
Dennis Gomes, 68, co-owner of Resorts Casino Hotel in Atlantic City and a former mob-busting Las Vegas prosecutor whose exploits inspired the movie Casino, died Friday, his son said. The Margate, N.J., resident died at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital of complications from kidney dialysis, said Aaron Gomes, vice president of operations at the casino. Dennis Gomes had developed kidney problems and was undergoing dialysis after breaking his back last year. "Whether or not it was related to his back we will never know, but he ended up having major kidney issues and was put on temporary dialysis," Aaron Gomes said.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | By David Johnston, Inquirer Staff Writer
The casinos here were a lot like their customers in the first quarter of 1991: Most of them lost money, but a few that were adept at playing the game came away winners. Although the temples of chance in Atlantic City had a combined loss of almost $55 million, all 12 casinos came away winners against their players, beating them for more than $657 million from January through March. The casinos also sold more than $166 million worth of bed space, food and booze for total income of more than $823 million.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2012 | Joe DiStefano
Ira Lubert and the professional investors he's hired as partners manage more than $10 billion in other people's money. With his fortune from profits and fees, Lubert buys his personal investments. Three months ago, a group he heads premiered 600 slot machines and 50 gambling tables, built around a stylish hotel bar and amid seven new restaurants, in a two-hotel complex at their Valley Forge Casino Resort. It's a small place compared, say, with the 3,500-slots, 180-table Parx in Bensalem, whose court challenges helped delay Lubert's casino for six years.
NEWS
March 19, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Table games revenue at Pennsylvania's 11 gambling halls last month totaled $55.3 million, a 2.1 decrease from a year ago, when the same revenue from blackjack, poker and other games was $56.6 million. February's tables revenue translated to nearly $8 million in state tax revenue, according to figures posted Monday by the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board. The state's top four table game revenue generators last month were Sands Casino Resort Bethlehem at $12.1 million from 183 tables; Parx in Bensalem at $8.2 million from 163 tables; SugarHouse at $7.3 million from 58 tables; and Harrah's Philadelphia Casino and Racetrack at $6.9 million with 121 tables.
NEWS
September 16, 1986 | By Mike Shurman, Special to The Inquirer (The Associated Press and Inquirer staff writers Rich Heidorn Jr. and Mark Wagenveld contributed to this article.)
Despite a last-minute wage offer, waitresses, bartenders, chambermaids and messengers at eight casino-hotels walked off their jobs this morning in their first strike since the advent of casino gambling in 1978. The employees, members of Local 54 of the Hotel and Restaurant Employees and Bartenders International, set up picket lines at 12:01 a.m. after rejecting an offer by the Atlantic City Casino Association for a two-year wage freeze, said business manager Dan Daidone. "We have people at each of the entrances of the (eight)
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