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Gaming Control Board

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BUSINESS
December 10, 2007 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Legal and political delays in opening Philadelphia's two waterfront casinos are costing about $1.8 million a day in gross slots revenue, according to a state gaming official. Targets for the casinos' openings have been pushed back about a year because of fervent neighborhood opposition, disputes over riverbed construction rights, and jurisdictional squabbles. Meanwhile, Pennsylvania, which gets a 55 percent cut of the two slots parlors' take, stands to lose about $990,000 in tax revenue for every day the openings are delayed, according to the state Gaming Control Board.
NEWS
June 28, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Plans to raise hundreds of millions of dollars for tax relief may be thrown dramatically off schedule unless divided Gaming Control Board members resolve a nine-month-old standoff today. Slots licenses, scheduled to be awarded beginning this fall, would not be granted until late 2007 or early 2008 if board members fail to decide the relatively mundane question of how slot machines are to be sold to the new gambling halls. Board chairman Thomas "Tad" Decker and others hope the dispute will be resolved, keeping the board on course to license six racetracks in September and five stand-alone slots casinos in December.
NEWS
June 10, 2010
Pennsylvania's gaming board today announced a staggered schedule for testing and unveiling table gambling at state casinos, allowing some table gaming to fully open beginning July 8. The Gaming Control Board said the procedure will begin with an eight-hour test period, with board personnel determining whether each casino is ready. If the conditions are met, each casino will go live with table games two days later, allowing one "down day" for any issues to be addressed. Three teams of Gaming Control Board personnel will be available.
NEWS
April 27, 2011
Tuesday's article about revenue from table games at Pennsylvania casinos included incorrect information provided by the state Gaming Control Board. The tax rate on table-games revenue will decrease to 14 percent from 16 percent effective early July 2012. The Inquirer wants its news report to be fair and correct in every respect, and regrets when it is not. If you have a question or comment about news coverage, contact assistant managing editor David Sullivan (215-854-2357)
NEWS
October 26, 2006
CLOSE, BUT no cigar, Philadelphia. In the ongoing pingpong game that is gaming reform legislation, the state Senate approved a revised bill that would restore zoning power over the casinos to the city. The bill was sent back to the House, where it stalled when further provisions were requested. The upshot: The bill is stalled until the Senate returns after the November election. Some have suggested that it's no conicidence that the grindingly slow process associated with this gaming reform bill, and the painful back-and-forth between House and Senate that has been going on for weeks, has now frozen the bill until it's too late to have an impact on the election.
NEWS
August 20, 2011 | By Marc Levy, Associated Press
HARRISBURG - A top official in the state attorney general's office was picked Friday to be chairman of the state Gaming Control Board, as Gov. Corbett selected a career prosecutor from a law enforcement agency that has spent considerable time investigating the board. Bill Ryan was Corbett's top deputy when the Republican governor was state attorney general. A former two-term Delaware County district attorney, Ryan also spent four months this year as acting attorney general after Corbett became governor in January.
NEWS
January 26, 2005 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Street yesterday named three people to head a task force that will develop a slots plan that the city will eventually present to the state Gaming Control Board. The Gaming Control Board will award licenses and determine the placement and design of two slot parlors in Philadelphia, irrespective of existing zoning, building and design codes. The city can only offer its advice. Street's announcement suggests he is gearing up an effort aimed at persuading the board to take local wants and desires into consideration.
NEWS
September 13, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia Park racetrack, whose owners advocated the expansion of gambling in Pennsylvania for more than a decade, has cleared the extensive background investigations of the state's Gaming Control Board and should receive a license this month to bring up to 5,000 slot machines to Bensalem. The Gaming Control Board, in a hearing on the track's casino-license application, said yesterday they found nothing objectionable in the backgrounds of the track's ownership, or its financial and operational history.
NEWS
September 21, 2006
GREAT EDITORIAL about the state's effort to transfer Philadelphia's zoning authority to the unelected Gaming Control Board in Harrisburg ("Harrisburg zoning-control freaks," Sept. 12). Politicians in Harrisburg and Philadelphia believe city residents don't much object to their waterfront being turned into Atlantic City without a public debate, citizen input, zoning authority or a good plan. But many of us do object. Act 71, the gaming law, was passed in the middle of the night, right before the 2004 July Fourth recess, just like the pay raise.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
LET THE hooting and hollering begin. Thursday and Friday, the Gaming Control Board will hear testimony from nearly 75 people in two days of public hearings on the second casino license to be awarded in Philadelphia. Six developers are vying for the chance to open the casino, and although tempers and emotions may not be running as high as the first time around, when Philadelphians were grappling with what impact two casinos might wield on the city and its neighborhoods, this week's hearings are hardly expected to be hushed, either.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 21, 2015 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Developer Bart Blatstein said Monday that he is withdrawing his appeal of the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board's decision in November to license a rival casino application in South Philadelphia, saying an appeal could take too long and there has been "significant" interest in his North Broad Street property. The gaming board rejected Blatstein's proposed Provence casino complex at Broad and Callowhill Streets, the former location of The Inquirer and Philadelphia Daily News, and two other casino proposals, Market8 and Casino Revolution.
NEWS
December 19, 2014 | By Chris Brennan
CLOUT CLOSES OUT 2014 with a final column of questions we hope to have answered in 2015. At the top of our list right now: Will the legal challenges filed yesterday by the three losing bidders for the city's second casino license lead to a real explanation of how the state Gaming Control Board broke a long logjam to vote for a winner last month? The board on Nov. 18 gave the license to Live! Hotel & Casino, a partnership between Greenwood Racing Inc., which runs Parx Casino in Bensalem, and the Cordish Co., which owns a casino in Maryland and Xfinity Live!
NEWS
November 20, 2014 | By Tricia L. Nadolny and Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writers
From his barbershop at Seventh and Bigler Streets, Darin Capo has seen all the concrete giants rise - the Wells Fargo Center in 1996, Lincoln Financial Field in 2003, Citizens Bank Park in 2004 - and worried how each would affect the neighborhood. When a customer stopped by Tuesday to say a new neighbor, a $425 million casino, had just gotten the go-ahead to move in, Capo was struck with déjà vu. But also with hope - that it would be good for business despite the mixed response from the men who sit in his barber's chair.
NEWS
June 16, 2014 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
James Bryan was a gambling omnivore. Blackjack or slots at Harrah's Philadelphia, sports betting, scratch-off lottery tickets - he played them all. To pay for his gambling binges, Bryan, 45, traded copper for cash. He did not peddle the innards of old buildings, but new, shiny coils of wire. A few times a week, he would drive to Accurate Metals on East Baltimore Pike in Lansdowne in his black Chevy pickup, owned by his employer, Wescott Electric. He would unload spindles from the truck bed, some still in shrink wrap.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
CHESTER Attorneys for a harness racing driver claim a poorly maintained track at Harrah's Philadelphia casino caused a crash that left him severely brain damaged last fall. A lawsuit filed Tuesday in Philadelphia by lawyers for Anthony Coletta follows the state's suspension last week of Harrah's forthcoming racing schedule because the casino failed to comply with requests to address track surface issues. Harrah's casino license is contingent on the Chester site's offering horse racing.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writer
With critical decisions affecting the future of gambling in Philadelphia on the horizon, Gov. Corbett has appointed to the Gaming Control Board a new commissioner who is a well-known legislative aide and former Exelon Corp. executive. David W. Woods of Delaware County will replace James Ginty, who was appointed by Gov. Ed Rendell and is completing his second three-year term. Woods is chief of staff for Senate Majority Leader Dominic Pileggi, whose district includes parts of Delaware and Chester Counties.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
Philadelphia's recent casino hearings brought back memories of those giddy days in 2006 when gambling was new to Pennsylvania and no amenity was too extravagant for our city's gaming halls. Once again, the applicants vied to seduce us with all kinds of extras. A 320-room resort hotel! Spas! Bike paths! Fishing piers! Skating rink! Luxury shops! A starchitect design! For most people, the promises made during the first licensing round have been lost in the mists of time. But because I am a magpie of the filing cabinet, I only had to dust off SugarHouse's 2006 proposal to see how it checked out against the 2013 reality.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
LET THE hooting and hollering begin. Thursday and Friday, the Gaming Control Board will hear testimony from nearly 75 people in two days of public hearings on the second casino license to be awarded in Philadelphia. Six developers are vying for the chance to open the casino, and although tempers and emotions may not be running as high as the first time around, when Philadelphians were grappling with what impact two casinos might wield on the city and its neighborhoods, this week's hearings are hardly expected to be hushed, either.
NEWS
May 18, 2012 | John Baer
Once in awhile something gets dropped into the state legislative hopper more interesting than the usual bridge-naming and nonsense. Take Rep. Paul Clymer's bill to address the public pension crisis by charging casino-goers a $2 cover charge. Yeah, I know, nobody going gambling wants to start with a sure loss. But the pension thing is real ugly and getting uglier every year. So the Bucks County Republican, long a gambling opponent, wants each patron entering any of the state's 11 casinos to take one (well, actually give two)
BUSINESS
May 13, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to expand its reach as regional casino competition intensifies, Harrah's Chester Casino and Racetrack becomes Harrah's Philadelphia Saturday. The name change, part of a rebranding that includes nongambling offerings, has everything to do with the casino's reaching a broader audience, and nothing to do with distancing it from its host city, said Harrah's general manager Ron Baumann. "It's all about how you define the market. Philly is the market we are after," he said during a tour of the casino this week.
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