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NEWS
December 25, 1991 | By David Hess, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Challenger space shuttle tragedy in 1986. The fiasco with the warped Hubble space telescope in 1990. The ongoing "Ill Wind" scandal involving defense purchases. All have something in common. They are examples, says Congress' General Accounting Office, of the federal government's heavy reliance on independent contractors and its failure to exert control over activities that should be managed by government officials. In each instance, major portions of the work on those projects or services were "contracted out" by the government to private companies.
NEWS
September 5, 1986 | By Gregory Spears, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Social Security Administration computer system, near collapse four years ago, has improved so dramatically that the agency may not need to buy a new $343 million desk-top computer network, according to a General Accounting Office report. "Computer backlogs that created delays in the processing of individual annual wage earnings and in the issuing of benefit payments no longer exist," the GAO concluded Wednesday in a report to Rep. Jack Brooks (D., Texas), chairman of the House Government Operations Committee.
NEWS
May 19, 1989 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon, whose problems buying sophisticated planes, tanks, and ships are well documented, has similar trouble buying ordinary computers it needs to keep track of its people and parts, congressional investigators said yesterday. The General Accounting Office's top official told a congressional hearing that eight major Defense Department computer systems have doubled in price to $2.1 billion and are years behind schedule, even though a top-level Pentagon panel was created to keep such things from happening.
NEWS
February 1, 2002 | By Larry Eichel
So now it's headed to the courts, the dispute over the records of the energy task force that Dick Cheney headed. You have to wonder why. Why would the administration go to such lengths to prevent the General Accounting Office, the investigatory arm of Congress, from obtaining the names of the individuals the task force consulted? The easy, cynical answer is that the President and vice president must have something to hide. It might even be true. But what is there to hide?
NEWS
February 26, 1987 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon's rush to simultaneously design and build its B-1B bomber has resulted in problems that will hamper the plane for years to come, the General Accounting Office told Congress yesterday. Efforts to resolve the problems are driving the price of the 100-plane program extremely close to the $28.1 billion ceiling set by President Reagan in 1981, and the Air Force may be forced to seek more money later this year, the GAO's top defense official told the House Armed Services Committee.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed to investigate why an electric device used in gynecological surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The GAO, which investigates how the government spends tax dollars, sent a confirmatory letter to U.S. Rep Mike Fitzpatrick (R, Pa). He and 11 other members of Congress requested the probe last month. "GAO accepts your request as work that is within the scope of its authority," said the Sept.
NEWS
December 16, 1988 | By Mark Thompson, Inquirer Washington Bureau
The Pentagon plans to replace its aging computer communications system inside Colorado's Cheyenne Mountain - the nerve center designed to warn of an attack on North America - but the General Accounting Office said yesterday that the new equipment is over budget, late and does not work. If work proceeds on the $281 million purchase, "a very high risk (will be posed)to overall communications for Cheyenne Mountain," the GAO said. The proposed system has "unstable software" that has prevented Air Force officials from issuing commands through the system and that engineers have been unable to fix, the agency said.
NEWS
February 7, 1992 | By Robert A. Rankin, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Justice Department has collected only a tiny fraction of the fines and restitutions ordered by courts in major savings and loan fraud cases, General Accounting Office officials said yesterday. And Justice officials acknowledged they had no idea how much had been collected. The government collected only $365,000 - less than one-half of 1 percent of the $83.6 million due in 55 of the largest cases, GAO officials told a Senate Banking subcommittee. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, studied fraud cases in which a total of $597 million was lost.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve members of Congress have asked the U.S. Government Accountability Office to investigate why an electric device used in gynecologic surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The tissue-dissecting device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small rather than large abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen an undetected uterine cancer. After that horrible scenario befell anesthesiologist Amy Reed at a Boston hospital in late 2013, she and her husband, heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators.
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NEWS
September 7, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The U.S. Government Accountability Office has agreed to investigate why an electric device used in gynecological surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The GAO, which investigates how the government spends tax dollars, sent a confirmatory letter to U.S. Rep. Mike Fitzpatrick (R., Pa.). He and 11 other members of Congress requested the probe last month. The tissue-slicing device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen undetected uterine cancer.
NEWS
August 9, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Twelve members of Congress have asked the U.S. Government Accountability Office to investigate why an electric device used in gynecologic surgery was marketed for two decades before safety warnings were issued by the Food and Drug Administration. The tissue-dissecting device, called a power morcellator, enables hysterectomies to be done through small rather than large abdominal incisions, but it can also spread and worsen an undetected uterine cancer. After that horrible scenario befell anesthesiologist Amy Reed at a Boston hospital in late 2013, she and her husband, heart surgeon Hooman Noorchashm, launched a campaign to ban electric morcellators.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
A government report suggests that New York City could edge out Philadelphia as a major hub and international gateway in the pending merger between US Airways Group and American Airlines. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) report says the combined carrier would have five East Coast hubs, "and one could logically think that's too many," its author, Gerald Dillingham, said in an interview. American's hubs include Miami and New York's John F. Kennedy International Airport.
NEWS
February 11, 2013 | By Krista Larson, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - Black-robed Islamic extremists armed with AK-47 automatic rifles invaded Gao in wooden boats Sunday to launch a surprise attack on the most populous city in northern Mali, two weeks after French and Malian troops ousted the jihadists. Gunfire echoed for hours across the city of mud-walled buildings. The combat started about 2 p.m. in downtown Gao and the fighting was continuing as night fell. Later the sound of gunfire was replaced by the clattering of French military helicopters overhead.
NEWS
February 10, 2013
Mali fighting continues GAO, Mali - Soldiers are fighting jihadists in their desert hideouts just outside Gao, the country's defense minister said Saturday, a day after a suicide bomber blew himself up at a checkpoint on the city's outskirts. Defense Minister Yamoussa Camara said at least two militants were killed during the fighting Friday several miles outside northern Mali's largest town. "We call on the population of Gao to not give in to panic and above all to cooperate with defense and security forces to drive out the terrorists who are trying to infiltrate among civilians," Camara said by telephone from Bamako, the capital.
NEWS
February 10, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - A young militant who locals say had ties to terrorist leader Moktar Belmoktar blew himself up Friday near a military checkpoint on the outskirts of Gao, fueling fears of a looming insurgency by jihadists who fled into the nearby desert just two weeks ago. The suicide attack, the first of its kind since the French-led mission began in January, highlights the challenges that remain despite the retaking of northern Mali's largest town by...
NEWS
February 9, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Baba Ahmed, Associated Press
GAO, Mali - A young militant who locals say had ties to terrorist leader Moktar Belmoktar blew himself up Friday near a military checkpoint on the outskirts of Gao, fueling fears of a looming insurgency by jihadists who fled into the nearby desert just two weeks ago. The suicide attack, the first of its kind since the French-led mission began in January, highlights the challenges that remain despite the retaking of northern Mali's largest town by...
NEWS
January 27, 2013 | By Krista Larson and Rukmini Callimachi, Associated Press
KONNA, Mali - French and Malian troops regained control of the airport and bridge of the crucial, northern city of Gao on Saturday, marking their biggest advance yet in their bid to oust al-Qaeda-linked extremists who have controlled northern Mali for months, military officials said. The move comes just two weeks after France launched its military offensive in support of the shaky central government of this former French colony. It is unclear what kind of resistance French and Malian troops will face in the coming days.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Chris Mondics, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Banks and other financial institutions are an important line of defense against scammers seeking to defraud the elderly, but too often tellers and branch managers are not trained to recognize the warning signs, says a Government Accountability Office report issued Thursday. The study, which looked at programs aimed at fighting fraud that targets the elderly in California, Illinois, Pennsylvania and New York, said that out of misguided concern they might breach federal privacy laws, banks and other financial institutions also are sometimes reluctant to share information with agencies that work to protect older people from financial crimes.
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