IN THE NEWS

Gap

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 17, 1996 | GEORGE MILLER/DAILY NEWS
About 300 students protest state cuts in education at City Hall yesterday before marching to the State Building, at Broad and Spring Garden streets. School and teachers union officials say suburban kids have $1,500 more a year spent on their schooling. The march was sponsored by the Coalition to Close the Gap.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | By DAVE RACHER, Daily News Staff Writer
A gap in the testimony of a 22-year-old rape victim has helped acquit a Wynnefield man of the offense. The victim, a Temple University student, testified she recalled Craig Poles, 31, having a "big gap" between his upper front teeth when he abducted her from a parking lot of a Wynnefield apartment building while she was delivering pizza on Feb. 28, 1986. Defense attorney Thomas W. Moore Jr. told the jury that Poles "does not have a gap between his teeth. " He called the woman's testimony a case of "mistaken identity.
NEWS
February 1, 2005
I'M SURE there's no credibility to the woman who has accused Bill Cosby of groping her. Why would anyone with a valid claim for sexual assault wait a year before filing a complaint? A valid complaint should have been made no later than two days after it had happened. What was she afraid of a year ago that she is not afraid to tell the world about it now? If she is after money, I hope she does not get one penny. Such a waste of the judicial system. Cheryl Gilbert Collingswood, N.J.
NEWS
September 16, 2003 | Matthew Miller
Matthew Miller is a senior fellow at the Center for American Progress You can ask Americans to spend $166 billion to get the job done in Iraq and in Afghanistan (that's $79 billion so far, plus the President's new request for $87 billion). You can ask us to tolerate modest budget deficits while spending what's needed to meet a major national challenge. But President Bush can't ask us for $166 billion for Iraq while he runs record $500 billion budget deficits and doubles the national debt - all in order to give $300 billion a year in tax cuts over the next decade mostly to the best-off people in America.
SPORTS
May 27, 2010
LedgeRock Golf Club's Chip Lutz took the first-round lead in the Golf Association of Philadelphia's first major tournament of the season with a 67 at Philadelphia Cricket Club's Militia Hill Course in the Mid-Amateur Championship on Wednesday. Lutz, the 2007 Mid-Amateur champ, birdied holes seven through nine and took a 1-stroke lead over Bidermann's William Jeremiah into Thursday's final round. The Results Chip Lutz, LedgeRock. . . 33-34?67 William Jeremiah, Bidermann.
NEWS
December 22, 2000 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia's two stadiums are another step closer to reality as Gov. Ridge yesterday provided an additional $10 million in state money, closing the funding gap in the $1 billion project to $43 million. City Council approved the city's commitment to the project Wednesday, but there was still a $53 million gap in financing for the stadiums in South Philadelphia. Mayor Street and the teams promised to look for other sources to make up the nut, and the state was an early target in the search.
SPORTS
January 10, 2006 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In what it believes is a nod toward the future of the game, the Golf Association of Philadelphia has approved the use of laser distance-measuring devices in its competitions this year. "Our view is, since these devices are now allowed under the rules of golf and they're likely to become more prevalent in the future, players should be able to use them in GAP events," Mark Peterson, the association's executive director, said yesterday. Although many of the 115 state and local golf associations across the country have banned the devices or are taking a wait-and-see attitude, the GAP's executive committee saw no reason to wait, voting by 17-1 in favor of permitting them in its 56 competitions.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
Market economies are not fair. They might be dynamic, creative and efficient. But it's not their job to be fair. It's their job to foster innovation and create wealth. In America, it is the society's job to be fair - with government playing a vital role. Thanks to global trends that are not within any politician's power to control, the American economy is distributing its rewards less evenly than it used to. What is within politicians' control is whether and how government acts to repair the damage and the injustice caused by these growing income gaps.
SPORTS
April 10, 2005 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Oscar Mestre Jr. of Overbrook Golf Club has been selected as captain of the team from the Golf Association of Philadelphia in the 44th Compher Cup Matches against the rival team from New Jersey. Mestre, 45, of Berwyn, will make his seventh appearance in the Compher Cup, which is set for April 27 at Hollywood Golf Club in Deal, N.J. The 12-man team Mestre will lead against the New Jersey State Golf Association is a cast of familiar names among the top amateurs from the area: Brian Gillespie of St. Davids Golf Club (fifth appearance)
NEWS
March 22, 2005 | By Tirdad Derakhshani INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A sure sign it's finally spring? Those very pink-hued, (sometimes sickly) sweet musical ads for the Gap starring American darling Sarah Jessica Parker and her rendition of the Broadway tune "I Enjoy Being a Girl. " But the British press is reporting that S.J.P., who's done three Gap campaigns so far, will do no more. It appears that Gap's face and voice are to be replaced by English teen sensation Joss Stone, who's currently in negotiations with the khaki-maker. According to London's Sunday Times, the Gap, which had previously used Madonna and Demi Moore, wants to capture the teen market by using the 17-year-old soul singer, who scored a hit last year with "Fell in Love with a Boy," a reworking of the White Stripes' "Fell in Love with a Girl.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With wages growing at the slowest rate in 33 years, the Securities and Exchange Commission's recent vote requiring publicly traded companies to report the ratio of chief executives' earnings to those of average workers should fuel discussion of income inequality and encourage companies to narrow the great divide. The pay-ratio rule is unfinished business from the five-year-old Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and it was mightily contested by business interests.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's recent announcement of a new program to extend broadband Internet into low-income homes couldn't have come at a better time. That's especially true in cities like Philadelphia, where the gaping digital divide has left so many families without a reliable online connection. ConnectHome will initially provide free or discounted broadband access to families in 28 communities nationally, including Philadelphia and Camden. The Department of Housing and Urban Development will partner with private Internet service providers to target families with school-age children living in publicly subsidized housing.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first 20 of 175 Gap stores picked to close throughout North America will shut their doors for good on Sunday, including two in upstate Pennsylvania and one in North Jersey. The closures are a sign of how far Gap has tumbled. Long a retail innovator, Gap has seen competitors adopt its quick-to-market strategies and has been getting gored by online competition. Another sign of its decline: Last quarter, the Gap division posted just more than half the U.S. sales of its Old Navy division, which has been doing better and is not seeing any closures.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Pennsylvania closed gaps in student achievement, the payoff would be enormous, according to a study released Monday. Had the Commonwealth wiped out achievement shortfalls based on race and ethnicity, family economic status, and parental education a decade ago, its gross domestic product would be as much as $44 billion higher and its students would sit near the top of U.S. and world rankings, according to the analysis by the RAND Corp. The study, commissioned by Temple University's Center on Regional Politics, found that each group of Pennsylvania students stands to gain up to $5.1 billion in lifetime income earnings and overall benefit to society if graduation-rate gaps fall away.
REAL_ESTATE
June 7, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A couple of studies have crossed my electronic desk, and I thought I'd share them with you, because both relate to topics I have written about in recent weeks. The first is a Cornell University analysis, published in an article in the June issue of the American Sociological Review, contending that foreclosures "fueled racial segregation in the United States. " The paper, co-authored by Kyle Crowder of the University of Washington and Amy Spring of Georgia State University, acknowledges that nine million American families have lost their homes to foreclosure since the real estate downturn started in 2007.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 3, 2015 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
PERHAPS Charlie Wilson should be playing the Powerball lottery these days. After all, the guy is on a hot streak. Recently, Wilson, lead singer of 1970s R&B headliner the Gap Band, and four of his collaborators - including his brother Lonnie (another brother/co-writer, Robert, died in 2010) - settled with DJ/producer Mark Ronson, Bruno Mars and others who had claimed composing credits on Ronson's megahit, "Uptown Funk. " Wilson and his partners (and their legal eagles) successfully argued that the song was a little too similar to the Gap Band's "Oops Upside Your Head.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Ilene Raymond Rush, For The Inquirer
For more than a century, medical education in the United States has meant learning how to practice medicine and how to do research to make medicine better. But that could be changing. Given the need for more primary-care physicians, the shortage of certain specialists, and the belief that medical schools boost local economies, 36 institutions have opened across the country in the last 20 years. That growth "has been accompanied by a shift toward new medical-education models where research plays a minimal role," according to a paper published recently in Science Translational Medicine.
NEWS
March 22, 2015 | By Huizhong Wu, Inquirer Staff Writer
U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan said Friday that Pennsylvania does the worst job in the nation of funding low-income school districts. "The state of Pennsylvania is 50th, dead last, in terms of the inequality between how wealthy school districts are funded and poor districts," Duncan said. Recent Education Department figures show that the amount spent on each student in Pennsylvania's poorest school districts is 33 percent less than the amount spent on each student in the wealthier districts.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|