IN THE NEWS

Gap

BUSINESS
June 2, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
How to get out of a $50 billion hole? First, stop digging, reasons State Rep. Mike Tobash (R., Pottsville). Tobash has a plan - a moderate plan, by today's standards - to stall the growing gap between the billions Pennsylvania's politically appointed pension trustees have invested, in hopes the money will magically grow very fast, and the tens of billions actually needed to keep future pensions flowing to ex-teachers, prison guards, legislators,...
NEWS
July 1, 2012 | By Wilson Ring, Associated Press
WEYBRIDGE, Vt. - One of the longest hiking trails in the United States stops 40 miles short of its most famous cousin, but a group is trying to bridge that gap. The North Country National Scenic Trail runs 4,600 miles from North Dakota to New York's eastern border. From there, it's about 40 miles across Vermont fields and mountains to the Appalachian Trail, the 2,170-mile hiking trail that runs from Georgia to Maine. Seeking to bring them together are a push from the organization that runs the North Country Trail; a changed attitude from officials in Vermont, where the connection was blocked decades ago; and a growing movement to connect the nation's longest hiking trails.
SPORTS
September 2, 1987 | By TIM KAWAKAMI, Daily News Sports Writer
Lance Luchnick, the agent for unsigned Eagles cornerback Roynell Young, visited the team's headquarters yesterday. But his client remained in Houston, still without an agreement as the regular season creeps ever closer and the hole his absence creates in the secondary grows all the more disturbing. Luchnick, who has been sparing in his public comments on the bargaining, said yesterday that although the chasms are narrowing in the long and increasingly complicated negotiations, no deal is imminent.
NEWS
April 17, 1989
Some people were meant to have a nickname; others were not. Michael Dukakis has never been and will never be a "Mike," campaign image-makers notwithstanding. It takes a moment, however, to recall who James Earl Carter Jr. is. The use of nicknames has no social or cultural boundaries, although the name itself may be a giveaway. (There aren't too many Spikes in CEO suites, and it's rare to find a Buffy in a bowling alley.) Americans have always been enamored of nicknames. We couldn't help but notice at the latest mob trial that not only did the accused murderers and their victim have colorful monikers, but even the prosecutor was formally known as Charles "Joey" Grant.
NEWS
May 12, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The woman doesn't want perfume for Mother's Day. Nor lingerie. Nor jewelry. She is too practical for the peignoir that graces the newspaper ad that lies between us as we fly from west to east, from work to home. What she would like for Mother's Day, she says, is a bridge. Something sturdy to span the gap that has eroded between herself and her husband, the mother and father of their children. A bridge for what she has come to call the guilt gap. Just 10 years ago, the couple had a relationship built on the most up-to- date principles of marital engineering.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001 | By JOYCE LAIN KENNEDY For the Daily News DEAR JOYCE:
My wife ended her long battle with cancer last October. I left my one-year job in September to take care of her. After she died, I took some time to get my affairs in order, travel and give grief its due. Now I am ready to get back to work and restore normality to my life. I have been looking for a new position in sales and service, but am concerned about the 10-month hole in my job history. Should I address the issue in my cover letter or leave it as it is? How do I approach the subject during the interview process?
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Across the country, tens of millions of Americans are signaling how they will vote for president this fall. They are doing it not by tuning in to campaign commercials, contributing to one of the candidates or registering at a polling place. Rather, they are making their political statement by attending religious services or celebrating Passover or Easter - or by ignoring the religious holidays. The religion gap is fast becoming the country's widest political division. Those who regularly attend religious services vote Republican by a margin of 2-to-1, and those who do not vote Democratic by the same margin.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | By TRUDY RUBIN
As the new Russia ushers in the new year, the mood is one of uncertainty and fear. Among pensioners, who get only about 340 rubles a month - $3.40 at the current exchange rate - there is talk of starvation. At the core of people's fear is the collapsing economy and rising prices. A series of reform plans have been tried and dropped. All were supposedly aimed at letting prices be set by the market, rather than central planners, with the hope of attracting more goods into the stores.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since 1992-93, the gap in spending between the Philadelphia School District and the surrounding suburban districts has more than doubled, a Philadelphia school official said yesterday. Philadelphia spent $6,969 per pupil in 1997-98, according to Pennsylvania Department of Education data. Average per-pupil spending in school districts in the surrounding four suburban counties of Chester, Bucks, Montgomery and Delaware was about $1,900 higher that year, said Bill Epstein, the Philadelphia School District's director of governmental relations.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Somewhere on the evening news, in between stories of various disasters and ads for various bodily dysfunctions, there appears the airline pilot. Well-paid but discontented. Handsome as the anchorman himself, but weary with his working man's lot. The pilot in this commercial vignette has come to his stockbroker to plan for the future before his horizons are reduced to Polident and Serenity. He is in a rut - if there are ruts in the sky - going back and forth between Detroit and Minneapolis.
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