IN THE NEWS

Gap

NEWS
May 12, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
The woman doesn't want perfume for Mother's Day. Nor lingerie. Nor jewelry. She is too practical for the peignoir that graces the newspaper ad that lies between us as we fly from west to east, from work to home. What she would like for Mother's Day, she says, is a bridge. Something sturdy to span the gap that has eroded between herself and her husband, the mother and father of their children. A bridge for what she has come to call the guilt gap. Just 10 years ago, the couple had a relationship built on the most up-to- date principles of marital engineering.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2001 | By JOYCE LAIN KENNEDY For the Daily News DEAR JOYCE:
My wife ended her long battle with cancer last October. I left my one-year job in September to take care of her. After she died, I took some time to get my affairs in order, travel and give grief its due. Now I am ready to get back to work and restore normality to my life. I have been looking for a new position in sales and service, but am concerned about the 10-month hole in my job history. Should I address the issue in my cover letter or leave it as it is? How do I approach the subject during the interview process?
NEWS
April 11, 2004 | By Steven Thomma INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Across the country, tens of millions of Americans are signaling how they will vote for president this fall. They are doing it not by tuning in to campaign commercials, contributing to one of the candidates or registering at a polling place. Rather, they are making their political statement by attending religious services or celebrating Passover or Easter - or by ignoring the religious holidays. The religion gap is fast becoming the country's widest political division. Those who regularly attend religious services vote Republican by a margin of 2-to-1, and those who do not vote Democratic by the same margin.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | By TRUDY RUBIN
As the new Russia ushers in the new year, the mood is one of uncertainty and fear. Among pensioners, who get only about 340 rubles a month - $3.40 at the current exchange rate - there is talk of starvation. At the core of people's fear is the collapsing economy and rising prices. A series of reform plans have been tried and dropped. All were supposedly aimed at letting prices be set by the market, rather than central planners, with the hope of attracting more goods into the stores.
NEWS
August 20, 1999 | By Susan Snyder, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Since 1992-93, the gap in spending between the Philadelphia School District and the surrounding suburban districts has more than doubled, a Philadelphia school official said yesterday. Philadelphia spent $6,969 per pupil in 1997-98, according to Pennsylvania Department of Education data. Average per-pupil spending in school districts in the surrounding four suburban counties of Chester, Bucks, Montgomery and Delaware was about $1,900 higher that year, said Bill Epstein, the Philadelphia School District's director of governmental relations.
NEWS
March 7, 1992 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Somewhere on the evening news, in between stories of various disasters and ads for various bodily dysfunctions, there appears the airline pilot. Well-paid but discontented. Handsome as the anchorman himself, but weary with his working man's lot. The pilot in this commercial vignette has come to his stockbroker to plan for the future before his horizons are reduced to Polident and Serenity. He is in a rut - if there are ruts in the sky - going back and forth between Detroit and Minneapolis.
SPORTS
January 27, 2002 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Craig Ammerman, president of the Golf Association of Philadelphia for the last three years, will step down at the end of this week to assume an even greater role in running the game. On Saturday, at the United States Golf Association's annual meeting in Colorado Springs, Colo., Ammerman will officially join that organization's executive committee, the 15-member ruling body of golf in North America. There is no formal rule or even a suggestion that Ammerman must resign his post with GAP - like the USGA post, it is a volunteer role - but he is doing so because of potential conflicts.
NEWS
February 9, 2001 | By Robert Moran and Joseph S. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
The Delaware River Port Authority took a significant step yesterday toward contributing $14 million to help close a funding gap for new Eagles and Phillies stadiums. The authority's projects committee unanimously approved a $10 million loan and a $4 million grant, and the full board is expected to approve the contribution during its Feb. 21 meeting. The amounts would reduce the funding gap in the stadium deal to $29 million. City representatives are continuing talks with other possible sources of funding and are confident the entire gap will be closed, said Phillies attorney David L. Cohen.
NEWS
September 18, 1998 | By David Boldt
The sensitive subject of the differences in black and white test scores is about to make a reappearance in the public arena - pushed forward this time by, of all people, liberals. The subject was shoved aside for the most part after the intense flare-up of controversy following the publication in 1994 of The Bell Curve by Charles Murray and Richard Herrnstein, who attributed the gap largely to inherent differences between blacks and whites. It will be brought back by The Black-White Test Score Gap, edited by Christopher Jencks of Harvard and Meredith Phillips of UCLA, and published this month by the Brookings Institution.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In an effort to close a $29 million gap in the $1 billion stadium deal, Mayor Street has proposed allowing Comcast-Spectacor to raise parking rates at the sports complex in exchange for providing more money for the new stadiums. Street's plan was contained in a proposal sent to City Council yesterday. The proposal did not indicate how much of the $29 million Comcast was prepared to cover. An aide to the mayor said the proposal would raise "a majority" of the figure. Parking now costs $7 for a Phillies game and $6 to $20 for an Eagles game, said William F. Martin, a lawyer for the city.
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