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Gap

NEWS
January 24, 2016 | Inquirer Staff
Anderson: Show me the money Gillian Anderson isn't having any of that good ol' boy Hollywood sexism. In an interview with the Daily Beast, The X-Files star says she was initially offered half the money of her male costar, David Duchovny , for the revival of the series, starting at 10 p.m. Sunday on Fox. "It was shocking to me, given all the work that I had done in the past to get us to be paid fairly. I worked really hard toward that and finally got somewhere with it," Anderson said.
NEWS
January 11, 2016
Mark J. Warshawsky is a senior research fellow with the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, where he cowrote, with Ross Marchand, "The Extent and Nature of State and Local Government Pension Problems and a Solution" When it comes to severe fiscal difficulties spurred by public pension mismanagement, Illinois and New Jersey receive the most attention. These two states, however, are hardly alone: According to an authoritative study by professors Robert Novy-Marx and Joshua D. Rauh published in the Journal of Finance, pensions in 21 states were funded below 40 percent in 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2015 | By Molly Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ashley Judd had quite the career going for her in the 1990s, starring in lady-led thrillers and rom-coms. But toward the mid-aughts, she seemed to disappear out of her own volition and has resurfaced only in bit parts as moms and wives. She takes center stage again in Big Stone Gap , a Southern romance featuring Judd as a woman who seeks escape but decides, when presented with the opportunity, to stay home instead. Big Stone Gap is based on the book by Adriana Trigiani, who penned an entire series about her hometown in Virginia.
NEWS
August 13, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
With wages growing at the slowest rate in 33 years, the Securities and Exchange Commission's recent vote requiring publicly traded companies to report the ratio of chief executives' earnings to those of average workers should fuel discussion of income inequality and encourage companies to narrow the great divide. The pay-ratio rule is unfinished business from the five-year-old Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and it was mightily contested by business interests.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | Inquirer Editorial Board
President Obama's recent announcement of a new program to extend broadband Internet into low-income homes couldn't have come at a better time. That's especially true in cities like Philadelphia, where the gaping digital divide has left so many families without a reliable online connection. ConnectHome will initially provide free or discounted broadband access to families in 28 communities nationally, including Philadelphia and Camden. The Department of Housing and Urban Development will partner with private Internet service providers to target families with school-age children living in publicly subsidized housing.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
The first 20 of 175 Gap stores picked to close throughout North America will shut their doors for good on Sunday, including two in upstate Pennsylvania and one in North Jersey. The closures are a sign of how far Gap has tumbled. Long a retail innovator, Gap has seen competitors adopt its quick-to-market strategies and has been getting gored by online competition. Another sign of its decline: Last quarter, the Gap division posted just more than half the U.S. sales of its Old Navy division, which has been doing better and is not seeing any closures.
NEWS
July 21, 2015
PHILADELPHIA'S future is dependent on the future of its children. Most parents know that. And most parents - rich, poor and middle-class - want a better life for their children. They also know, in their gut, that the path to that better life is an education. There is a vast aspiring class of parents in this city who spend an enormous amount of time and effort seeking a good education for their kids. They join the admissions lottery at charter schools. They sometimes move to be in the catchment area of a good public school.
NEWS
July 15, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
If Pennsylvania closed gaps in student achievement, the payoff would be enormous, according to a study released Monday. Had the Commonwealth wiped out achievement shortfalls based on race and ethnicity, family economic status, and parental education a decade ago, its gross domestic product would be as much as $44 billion higher and its students would sit near the top of U.S. and world rankings, according to the analysis by the RAND Corp. The study, commissioned by Temple University's Center on Regional Politics, found that each group of Pennsylvania students stands to gain up to $5.1 billion in lifetime income earnings and overall benefit to society if graduation-rate gaps fall away.
REAL_ESTATE
June 7, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
A couple of studies have crossed my electronic desk, and I thought I'd share them with you, because both relate to topics I have written about in recent weeks. The first is a Cornell University analysis, published in an article in the June issue of the American Sociological Review, contending that foreclosures "fueled racial segregation in the United States. " The paper, co-authored by Kyle Crowder of the University of Washington and Amy Spring of Georgia State University, acknowledges that nine million American families have lost their homes to foreclosure since the real estate downturn started in 2007.
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