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Garage Rock

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1995 | By Bruce Warren, FOR THE INQUIRER
Rooted in an abrasive pastiche of demented rockabilly, garage rock, and the Delta blues, New York's Boss Hog (recently signed to Geffen Records) tore into an entertaining hour-long set of songs with style and flair Friday at the Khyber Pass. Playing the role of underground punk diva with confidence, lead vocalist Cristina Martinez was dressed in black, looking like a cheerleader pinup poster girl. Martinez's sultry wail and trashy seductive persona are the visual focus for Boss Hog, but without her guitarist husband Jon Spencer this would be just another one of the thousands of garage rock bands attempting to rise above the limitations of its three-chord aesthete.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2002 | By Nick Cristiano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For Steven Van Zandt, the reason to start his own radio show was simple. "Most of my favorite things, I'm not hearing" on the air, said the trusted sidekick to both Bruce Springsteen and Tony Soprano. And "I consider them to be . . . very important as far as representing the tradition and history of rock and roll. " They're not the horn-fired rhythm-and-blues Van Zandt created for Southside Johnny, or the anthems he cranks out in the E Street Band, or even the soul, funk and hard rock he's fashioned in his solo career.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | By SARA SHERR -- For the Daily News
If you want to dig deeper than the Dave Matthews Band, Justin Timberlake or the emo band of the moment, let Philadelphia's music scene be your campus. Options for under-21s are somewhat limited, but you can still hear good music on a budget at least once or twice a week. Over 21? The world is your oyster. All-ages venues The Church: Sean Agnew and his R5 Productions transform a church basement into a social and cultural hub. Discover the latest indie, punk, hip-hop, electronic and every other kind of band that fits under the loose classification of "independent music.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
Right now, Holly Golightly is the queen of garage rock. Much respect to Meg White of the White Stripes, but the British singer-songwriter has been working way longer and harder for the crown. Just listen to the way she sings, "Think you got it easy?/ Try bein' me," on "Walk a Mile," the first track from her new album, Truly She Is None Other (Damaged Goods). This is a woman who has clearly paid her dues in cramped, smelly tour vans and smoky pubs. Holly Golightly (her real name)
NEWS
November 22, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
"Garage rock siren" is a convenient way to categorize retro song stylist Holly Golightly (yes, it's her real name). If you're familiar with her old outfit, Thee Headcoatees - an early '90s British combo that blended girl-group sass, a combustible three-chord growl, and a tart sense of humor - you know the tag isn't far off the mark. But playing before a fairly full room Friday at the Khyber, the singer-guitarist-songwriter (whose guest-vocal spot on the White Stripes' 2003 album Elephant upped her commercial profile)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
In search of garage rock - and not a Nuggets fashion show? Look no further than the Woggles, a manic Athens, Ga., combo experienced at making people dance no matter how hot it is. Philly's Farfisa-fueled Mondo Topless and Full Blown Cherry round out the bill (10 tonight, Tritone, 1508 South St., 215-545-0475, $7, www.tritonebar .com). Steel Cage Records, the most badass label in town, is putting out the next release by the Jabbers, a monster offspring between members of G.G. Allin's backing band and the Queers.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Saturday at the Tweeter Center, it was OK Go's night; Snow Patrol just headlined it. Snow Patrol, as you may well known, is the British band that had huge, ubiquitous hits with "Run" (a.k.a. the "Light Up" song) and "Chasing Cars," which, thanks to some emotionally pitched placement in movies and TV dramas, have become suburban anthems for minivan malcontents everywhere - the kind of songs that make you want to open up the moon roof and pump your fist in the air. That's the good news.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011
Brendan McKinney He was much too cool to work the "newspaper connection" angle. Instead, Brendan touted how Space-Stationed U.S. astronaut Cady Coleman had chosen (of all the songs in the galaxy!) to perform his "Get Yourself Paroled" in a recent, long-distance videophone jam-up with her band at SXSW. Only after I got into his rousing new set of alt country/twang rock, "Best They Can," and his hefty vocal strengths (sometimes evocative of a young Neil Diamond), did I go reading the man's bio. Lo and behold, Brendan's the offspring of the late longtime Daily News columnist and talk radio star Jack McKinney.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
Other than a muttered "thank you" or two, Roky Erickson didn't speak a word to the audience at Union Transfer on Monday night. He alternated between playing his guitar and fidgeting with it, occasionally shoving it away from himself as if it were an irritant. His fingers didn't always hit their marks, leading to a few clamorous dissonances and more than one endearing "whoops. " But after a storied decades-long battle with mental illness, it's hard to believe that Erickson can perform at all. The small but enthusiastic crowd was more than willing to overlook a few glaring imperfections to witness an unusual appearance by the troubled psychedelic-rock pioneer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, FOR THE INQUIRER
Other than a muttered "thank you" or two, Roky Erickson didn't speak a word to the audience at Union Transfer on Monday night. He alternated between playing his guitar and fidgeting with it, occasionally shoving it away from himself as if it were an irritant. His fingers didn't always hit their marks, leading to a few clamorous dissonances and more than one endearing "whoops. " But after a storied decades-long battle with mental illness, it's hard to believe that Erickson can perform at all. The small but enthusiastic crowd was more than willing to overlook a few glaring imperfections to witness an unusual appearance by the troubled psychedelic-rock pioneer.
NEWS
February 27, 2012 | By Patrick Berkery, For The Inquirer
It's taken Heartless Bastards vocalist-guitarist-songwriter Erika Wennerstrom four albums to arrive at a place where her songs are as consistently compelling as her voice, a primal alto yowl that serves as a calling card for the band's sturdy guitar-bass-drums racket. Her Austin-by-way-of-Ohio quartet's latest, Arrow , expands on the mange-meets-melody m.o. of the first three albums by successfully incorporating subtle shades of '70s country rock and soul into the mix. There's now more room for Wennerstrom's voice to roam, and the songs are much more memorable and dynamic.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2011
Brendan McKinney He was much too cool to work the "newspaper connection" angle. Instead, Brendan touted how Space-Stationed U.S. astronaut Cady Coleman had chosen (of all the songs in the galaxy!) to perform his "Get Yourself Paroled" in a recent, long-distance videophone jam-up with her band at SXSW. Only after I got into his rousing new set of alt country/twang rock, "Best They Can," and his hefty vocal strengths (sometimes evocative of a young Neil Diamond), did I go reading the man's bio. Lo and behold, Brendan's the offspring of the late longtime Daily News columnist and talk radio star Jack McKinney.
NEWS
November 13, 2007 | By Dan DeLuca INQUIRER MUSIC CRITIC
I wish I could get as revved up about Alicia Keys as Bob Dylan is. On "Thunder on the Mountain," from last year's Modern Times, the Bard found himself "wondering where in the world Alicia Keys could be," and later told Rolling Stone, "There's nothing about that girl I don't like. " Kinda creepy, but for her part, Keys, whose new album As I Am (RCA . 1/2) comes out today, seemed more impressed than distressed. "We are kindred spirits," she told the Times of London. "He writes from the heart, he writes from the soul - so do I. " That may well be true, but on As I Am, Keys isn't exactly revealing insightful truth from deep within.
NEWS
March 26, 2007 | By Jonathan Valania FOR THE INQUIRER
Saturday at the Tweeter Center, it was OK Go's night; Snow Patrol just headlined it. Snow Patrol, as you may well known, is the British band that had huge, ubiquitous hits with "Run" (a.k.a. the "Light Up" song) and "Chasing Cars," which, thanks to some emotionally pitched placement in movies and TV dramas, have become suburban anthems for minivan malcontents everywhere - the kind of songs that make you want to open up the moon roof and pump your fist in the air. That's the good news.
NEWS
November 22, 2004 | By Patrick Berkery FOR THE INQUIRER
"Garage rock siren" is a convenient way to categorize retro song stylist Holly Golightly (yes, it's her real name). If you're familiar with her old outfit, Thee Headcoatees - an early '90s British combo that blended girl-group sass, a combustible three-chord growl, and a tart sense of humor - you know the tag isn't far off the mark. But playing before a fairly full room Friday at the Khyber, the singer-guitarist-songwriter (whose guest-vocal spot on the White Stripes' 2003 album Elephant upped her commercial profile)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2004 | By SARA SHERR For the Daily News
In search of garage rock - and not a Nuggets fashion show? Look no further than the Woggles, a manic Athens, Ga., combo experienced at making people dance no matter how hot it is. Philly's Farfisa-fueled Mondo Topless and Full Blown Cherry round out the bill (10 tonight, Tritone, 1508 South St., 215-545-0475, $7, www.tritonebar .com). Steel Cage Records, the most badass label in town, is putting out the next release by the Jabbers, a monster offspring between members of G.G. Allin's backing band and the Queers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2003 | By Amy Phillips FOR THE INQUIRER
Right now, Holly Golightly is the queen of garage rock. Much respect to Meg White of the White Stripes, but the British singer-songwriter has been working way longer and harder for the crown. Just listen to the way she sings, "Think you got it easy?/ Try bein' me," on "Walk a Mile," the first track from her new album, Truly She Is None Other (Damaged Goods). This is a woman who has clearly paid her dues in cramped, smelly tour vans and smoky pubs. Holly Golightly (her real name)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 2003 | By SARA SHERR -- For the Daily News
If you want to dig deeper than the Dave Matthews Band, Justin Timberlake or the emo band of the moment, let Philadelphia's music scene be your campus. Options for under-21s are somewhat limited, but you can still hear good music on a budget at least once or twice a week. Over 21? The world is your oyster. All-ages venues The Church: Sean Agnew and his R5 Productions transform a church basement into a social and cultural hub. Discover the latest indie, punk, hip-hop, electronic and every other kind of band that fits under the loose classification of "independent music.
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