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NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Presidential aspirant Michele Bachmann has a history of being gaffe-prone, but her latest remarks so angered University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan that on Thursday he challenged her to put up or pipe down. Bachmann told Fox News and NBC's Today show this week that she had heard from a distraught mother whose daughter "suffered mental retardation" from taking the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine. Bachmann's statement has been denounced by the American Academy of Pediatrics, advocates for the disabled, and public-health experts.
NEWS
May 19, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A vaccine to prevent cervical cancer won endorsement yesterday by a federal medical panel, a key step toward approval for use by millions of girls and young women perhaps by July. Gardasil, which would be manufactured in the Philadelphia suburbs by Merck & Co. Inc., still needs final approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but the agency typically takes its panels' advice. Merck predicted Gardasil would prevent about 350,000 cases yearly of cervical cancer worldwide within two decades, when all girls vaccinated as infants will have entered high-risk adulthood.
BUSINESS
September 27, 2007 | By Karl Stark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Merck & Co. Inc. said yesterday that it would donate three million doses of its new cervical-cancer vaccine Gardasil to the developing world. The gift would be enough to help protect three million women, said Margaret G. McGlynn, president of Merck Vaccines & Infectious Disease, speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York. Merck executives estimated the gift's value at $375.5 million, based on U.S. prices. They said they would give up to three million doses of Gardasil to a nongovernmental organization that would review proposals from groups in developing countries.
NEWS
August 19, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Three years after the world's first cervical-cancer vaccine was hailed as a public-health breakthrough, Gardasil is facing renewed questions about its safety and value. In today's Journal of the American Medical Association, federal researchers analyze 12,424 voluntary reports of post-vaccination "adverse events" ranging from headaches to deaths. They conclude that only two complaints - fainting and dangerous blood clots -- are more common than expected and may be related to the immunization.
BUSINESS
June 9, 2006 | By Thomas Ginsberg INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With a green light from regulators, Merck & Co. Inc. has begun deploying 1,500 freshly trained salespeople and unleashing a huge marketing campaign around a delicate topic: cancer and sex. The Food and Drug Administration approved Merck's cervical-cancer vaccine Gardasil yesterday, inaugurating a vaccine market potentially worth several billion dollars a year, with the Philadelphia area at its core. Gardasil will be manufactured and marketed from Merck's West Point complex. GlaxoSmithKline P.L.C.
NEWS
September 10, 2009 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Government advisers yesterday recommended federal approval of Cervarix, the GlaxoSmithKline cervical cancer vaccine, after reviewing studies showing it is significantly more effective than Gardasil, the rival vaccine made by Merck & Co. But Merck's product, which has had a three-year head start in the U.S. market, got another boost yesterday when the committee urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to expand its approval for prevention of...
NEWS
January 18, 2007 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abington pediatrician Steven Shapiro thinks the new vaccine against cervical cancer is a major medical advance that will benefit all of society. Even so, he isn't offering Gardasil to his patients. He says insurance reimbursements don't cover his costs to buy, store and administer it. "I'm in practice with four physicians and we simply can't afford it," said Shapiro, who also chairs the pediatrics department at Abington Memorial Hospital. Seven months after the federal government approved Merck & Co. Inc.'s much-heralded immunization for females ages 9 to 26, Gardasil can be difficult for patients to get. By all accounts, the vaccine could eventually save thousands of lives and billions of dollars annually in this country.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does it make sense to vaccinate all boys against a sexually transmitted virus that causes a common cancer they are physically incapable of developing? An expert government panel last month concluded the answer is yes. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended all U.S. boys ages 11 and 12 be given the cervical cancer prevention vaccine Gardasil, partly to compensate for the "disappointing" usage in girls. The committee's other main rationale was that boys may get some protection of their own because the virus, HPV, is linked to anal cancer.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Margaret G. "Margie" McGlynn, president of Merck Vaccines & Infectious Diseases, announced her retirement yesterday, effective Nov. 1. Company spokeswoman Amy Rose said McGlynn, a pharmacist who started with Merck in 1981 as a summer intern, "indicated that she has many personal and professional aspirations that she would like to pursue. " McGlynn is 49. She declined requests for an interview yesterday. Merck will merge with Schering-Plough in the fourth quarter. McGlynn took her current position in 2005.
NEWS
June 19, 2006
The Food and Drug Administration has delivered an important victory for girls and women in the fight against cervical cancer. In a decision late last week, the FDA approved the sale of the first vaccine to prevent cervical cancer, which claims the lives of 3,900 women in the United States annually. The new drug, Gardasil, is manufactured by Merck & Co. and is expected to cost more than $300 for a three-shot course. Gardasil kills two strains of the human papillomavirus (HPV)
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NEWS
October 26, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
If parents and their adolescent daughters knew that the HPV vaccine protects against cervical cancer, they'd be more likely to get the shots than uninformed people, right? Um, no, judging from a University of Pennsylvania study that tested the seemingly logical assumption. The yearlong study of 360 parents and teen girls from low-income, predominantly African American neighborhoods in Philadelphia found no link between knowledge about the vaccine and actual immunization, even though it was available free at city health clinics.
NEWS
June 21, 2013 | By Mike Stobbe, Associated Press
ATLANTA - A vaccine against a cervical cancer virus has cut infections in teen girls by half, according to a study released Wednesday. The study confirms research done before the HPV vaccine came on the market in 2006. But this is the first evidence of how well it works now that it is in general use. "These are striking results, and I think they should be a wake-up call that we need to increase vaccination rates," said Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's not every day that a movie star says "cancer" and "cunnilingus" to a reporter, so Michael Douglas probably should have known his frankness would become fodder for bloggers, tweeters, and late-night comics. In any case, his revelation last week that his throat cancer was caused by a sexually transmitted virus can serve as a teachable moment - which is what he later said was his aim in the Guardian interview. Human papillomavirus, or HPV, is a family of more than 100 virus types that can live in the flat, thin cells on the surface of the skin, cervix, vagina, anus, vulva, penis, mouth, and throat.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2013 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Multinational drug companies, like other businesses, see Africa as an emerging market with tremendous opportunities and challenges, and that was a backdrop to Thursday's announcements of two programs designed to deliver more medicine and better health care to the continent. Merck & Co. and GlaxoSmithKline Plc joined the GAVI alliance in announcing from Cape Town, South Africa, an agreement to supply human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at lower prices to developing countries to help girls and women in those nations avoid cervical cancer.
NEWS
November 9, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Does it make sense to vaccinate all boys against a sexually transmitted virus that causes a common cancer they are physically incapable of developing? An expert government panel last month concluded the answer is yes. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended all U.S. boys ages 11 and 12 be given the cervical cancer prevention vaccine Gardasil, partly to compensate for the "disappointing" usage in girls. The committee's other main rationale was that boys may get some protection of their own because the virus, HPV, is linked to anal cancer.
NEWS
September 20, 2011
THE RECENT Republican debate, with all the weighty issues we have, really took on an issue that I've talked a lot about and is very hot in the area of parenting: vaccines and vaccinating our kids. There's a movie out right now called "Contagion" about a vaccine to combat a lethal pathogen that's actually dangerous. The film paints a story that the epidemic and vaccine were created by the government to enrich drug companies. Hollywood met reality in the GOP debate when Texas Gov. Rick Perry was roundly criticized for his controversial mandate that 12-year-old girls be vaccinated against the human papilloma virus, believed to be a leading cause of cervical cancer.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2011 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drug ads with scary-sounding side effects have regularly appeared on TV since 1995, but rarely has a major pharmaceutical company played such an unscripted, prime-time role as Merck did Monday night - a moment that put the klieg lights on corporate political contributions. Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann attacked fellow Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry during the GOP debate over the Texas governor's 2007 decision to have young girls inoculated against a virus that can contribute to cervical cancer.
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Presidential aspirant Michele Bachmann has a history of being gaffe-prone, but her latest remarks so angered University of Pennsylvania bioethicist Arthur Caplan that on Thursday he challenged her to put up or pipe down. Bachmann told Fox News and NBC's Today show this week that she had heard from a distraught mother whose daughter "suffered mental retardation" from taking the Gardasil cervical cancer vaccine. Bachmann's statement has been denounced by the American Academy of Pediatrics, advocates for the disabled, and public-health experts.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2011
DEAR ABBY: As children come to their mothers to mend their scraped knees and broken hearts, readers in turn come to you for advice that can mend fractured relationships and save lives. Knowing how much mothers everywhere value your wisdom, the Food and Drug Administration's Office of Women's Health and the Federal Citizen Information Center have created the Healthy Moms Advice Kit for your readers. It's filled with practical tips on topics such as hay fever, recognizing and conquering depression, keeping food safe, discovering the real differences between name-brand and generic drugs and - every mom's dream - learning the secrets of getting a good night's sleep.
NEWS
December 2, 2009
'Law of the land' changes over time Your "Pressure from the pulpit" editorial Friday excoriated the Catholic Church for threatening excommunication for Catholic legislators who choose to promote policies condemned by the church. Your editors appeared to be in high dudgeon as they invoked separation of church and state and alluded to the obligation of elected officials to support the "law of the land. " Well, let's go back to the 1850s, when slavery was the law of the land.
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