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Gargoyles

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NEWS
August 1, 1992 | By David Iams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If you drop in at the gallery of Main Line Auctioneers in Malvern for today's sale, the first thing you will see, hanging in the entry hall, are four carved wooden bas reliefs, similar to the gargoyles on Gothic churches. In the first gallery to the right are dozens of cast toy soldiers; a few paces back are half a dozen decoys. In short, this is a sale for people who like to say "go figure. " The gargoyles seem to depict four schoolboys, three reading, the fourth doing his numbers.
NEWS
October 12, 1989 | By Toni Locy, Daily News Staff Writer
Whipped by wind and dumped on by birds for nearly 90 years, the gargoyles that stare in stony silence from atop City Hall need some tender loving care. Feel a tear coming to your eye? Then how about adopting a gargoyle? Don't laugh - someone may ask you to do just that. The 21st Century League, a coalition of community and business leaders, yesterday officially announced that it is joining forces with Mayor Goode's City Hall Committee to begin the long, expensive process of restoring City Hall's dignity.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | By Wendy Greenberg, Special to The Inquirer
Whimsical or menacing, the Gothic faces are silent but expressive. Perched on walls, corners and archways, the carved creatures frozen in a medieval fantasy have a lore all their own. The gargoyles at Beaver College's Grey Towers Castle now have a life of their own, too, on the pages of a calendar being sold in bookstores throughout the country and designed by a graduate of the Glenside college. For Tom Sciascia, the gazing gargoyles, now an almost obsolete architectural form, evoke the campus itself.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dozens of colleges and universities in and around Philadelphiaare full of quirky facts and odd history. As a taste, here are the answers toquestions you probably never thought to ask about college. Question: Is it true that the dead walk on campus? Answer: Well, at Cabrini College, the daughter of a 19th-century aristocratis said to have jumped out of the family mansion when her father objected toher relationship with a stablehand. The mansion today houses the school'sadministration offices; over the years, students and staff have reportednumerous early-morning sightings of an apparition with long blond hair on thebalcony, wearing a blue gown.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | By Cheryl Squadrito, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Although the words flowed in iambic pentameter, the action seemed right out of a Hollywood thriller. Fight scenes. Bawdy women in a tavern. Volatile father-son relationships. Henry IV, Part One is the featured performance for this summer's Shakespeare in the Park series at Cabrini College. The shows are performed behind a mansion on the college grounds and audiences are invited to take lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the show under the stars. Admission is free.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Staff Writer
If you're in the market for architectural ornaments and trimmings, four Philadelphia firms may have just what you need. And even if you don't need anything, poke around to your heart's content. ARCHITECTURAL ANTIQUES EXCHANGE, 715 N. 2nd St. Owner Mark Charry stocks marble and wood mantels, back bars, armoires, church artifacts, sinks and tubs, leaded glass windows and furniture in various states of repair in a sprawling, dusty showroom/shop. Many of the elaborate backbars have been sold to area hotels and restaurants.
NEWS
August 14, 1994 | By Andrew Metz, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Behold Debora Glazer's friends. There's Dracula's Dog, the Canterbury Devil, the Winged Warrior, Irving and Fred, the Guardian of Hopes and Dreams and, oh yes, Baby Goyle. Glazer, standing with her friends in her new shop called Gothic Creations, presses her tongue against the roof of her mouth and her cheeks slowly retreat. "Gargoyles," she says deliberately, articulating each syllable. "They're everywhere, they're everywhere. " Indeed they are. Glazer, who moved here from Connecticut with her husband in April, has filled her small shop just off West Mechanic Street with hundreds of the gypsum concrete creatures known as gargoyles.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Amid the brilliant perennials and neatly trimmed hedges at the Chester County Flower Show, a 20-foot clock tower looms overhead, sending thousands of gallons of water through the mouths of four gargoyles as each hour ticks by. One of 32 displays at the show, which closes today at 6 p.m., the computerized tower is programmed to shoot water at every quarter-hour from each of the gargoyles perched atop its copper-and-slate roof. The exhibit, considered to be one of the most sophisticated computerized displays in a regional flower show, is a joint venture by two companies brought together through the flower show.
NEWS
August 6, 2007
CHRIS Brennan's Aug. 1 story on the state Gaming Control Board shake-up ("Pa. gaming chairman, targeted by casino foes, to quit board") is excellent. Citizen action has made a huge difference when it comes to casinos coming to Philadelphia. Just a week ago, the two proposed casinos admitted their failure to get support here and asked for a delay in paying their $50 million licensing fees. And PICA, the state watchdog of city finances, raised serious concerns that the next mayor and the city will inherit truckloads of red ink from the proposed casinos, thanks to the governor and Mayor Street.
NEWS
March 15, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The British are better at developing female action stars than we are, recognizing that high cheekbones and a supple trigger finger make an irresistible combination. First Kate Beckinsale in the Underworld movies and now Rhona Mitra in Doomsday, an intriguing if derivative sci-fi thriller. To play a deadly commando in the year 2035, Mitra, best known to American audiences for her stint on Boston Legal , has her hair cut in an ultra-angular shag so that she resembles Victoria Beckham on steroids.
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NEWS
May 27, 2012 | By Eric W. Herr, FOR THE INQUIRER
Michael Gerard Walzer has taken that old saying "A man's home is his castle" to heart, quite literally transforming his home into one. From the outside, the circa-mid-1930s, three-story fieldstone-and-wood structure looks like any other in his Northwood neighborhood of Northeast Philadelphia. But step beyond the curtain that separates the foyer from the living room, and the look and feel of a medieval castle (complete with two thrones) is immediately apparent. Gargoyles of every shape and size can be found throughout the house: on tabletops, on the floor, in a stairwell; molded into corbels jutting out from the walls, or embedded into the corners of faux cast-iron doors.
NEWS
March 15, 2008 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
The British are better at developing female action stars than we are, recognizing that high cheekbones and a supple trigger finger make an irresistible combination. First Kate Beckinsale in the Underworld movies and now Rhona Mitra in Doomsday, an intriguing if derivative sci-fi thriller. To play a deadly commando in the year 2035, Mitra, best known to American audiences for her stint on Boston Legal , has her hair cut in an ultra-angular shag so that she resembles Victoria Beckham on steroids.
NEWS
August 6, 2007
CHRIS Brennan's Aug. 1 story on the state Gaming Control Board shake-up ("Pa. gaming chairman, targeted by casino foes, to quit board") is excellent. Citizen action has made a huge difference when it comes to casinos coming to Philadelphia. Just a week ago, the two proposed casinos admitted their failure to get support here and asked for a delay in paying their $50 million licensing fees. And PICA, the state watchdog of city finances, raised serious concerns that the next mayor and the city will inherit truckloads of red ink from the proposed casinos, thanks to the governor and Mayor Street.
NEWS
October 1, 2004 | By Nancy Viau
I've traveled Utah's desert highways, Colorado's mountain trails, Florida's Alligator Alley, and other areas, but as I bump along the back roads in South Jersey, I'm keenly aware it's an experience like no other. I wander past endless cornfield mazes, come nose to hood with cows, and quite often get lost while navigating a secret way to the Shore. But whether it's the less traveled routes or the busier streets, I find that many have one thing in common: They are lined with an abundance of junk.
NEWS
April 30, 2000 | By Kate Herman, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Amid the brilliant perennials and neatly trimmed hedges at the Chester County Flower Show, a 20-foot clock tower looms overhead, sending thousands of gallons of water through the mouths of four gargoyles as each hour ticks by. One of 32 displays at the show, which closes today at 6 p.m., the computerized tower is programmed to shoot water at every quarter-hour from each of the gargoyles perched atop its copper-and-slate roof. The exhibit, considered to be one of the most sophisticated computerized displays in a regional flower show, is a joint venture by two companies brought together through the flower show.
NEWS
September 4, 1997 | By Ralph Vigoda, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The dozens of colleges and universities in and around Philadelphiaare full of quirky facts and odd history. As a taste, here are the answers toquestions you probably never thought to ask about college. Question: Is it true that the dead walk on campus? Answer: Well, at Cabrini College, the daughter of a 19th-century aristocratis said to have jumped out of the family mansion when her father objected toher relationship with a stablehand. The mansion today houses the school'sadministration offices; over the years, students and staff have reportednumerous early-morning sightings of an apparition with long blond hair on thebalcony, wearing a blue gown.
REAL_ESTATE
April 13, 1997 | By Sheila Dyan, FOR THE INQUIRER
The Chatham, Rittenhouse Square area, Philadelphia "Watch your step, please. " Where can you hear this personal directive from an elevator operator these days other than in an old movie? At The Chatham, a 70-year-old high-rise off Rittenhouse Square, where a real, live elevator operator escorts residents though the day's ups and downs, every day. "It's a very personal touch," said Mark Jacobi, 43, a craftsman of musical instruments, and a resident of The Chatham for two years.
NEWS
June 16, 1996 | By Christian Davenport, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
For summer sojourners passing through the Main Line, it offers a glimpse of details they might otherwise miss. For those who live here, it provides a new look at some beautiful scenes they might not have noticed. The photography exhibit of Main Line architecture at the Radnor Hotel on Lancaster Avenue in St. Davids includes scenes of nearby golf courses, monumental arches, skyward towers, crouching gargoyles and the staunch pillars of academia. The hotel, with its wood-paneled barroom, board room, halls and lobby and its piped-in classical music, has become an art gallery of sorts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
For those of you who miss the hearty gumbos and jambalayas they used to turn out at Billy's Creole Kitchen - which was what they called the galley atO'Neal's on South Third Street - don't fret. The guys who made all those ragin' Cajun goodies have opened their own place: Gargoyles Restaurant & Pub in Old City. Billy Babcock and Stosh Bolc have joined with Jason Herceg to turn the old Grapevine disco club on Vine Street into a homestyle New Orleans eatery where you can get your po' boys dressed and your catfish blackened.
NEWS
February 20, 1995 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
One day last week, a big, fierce-looking creature with glittering green eyes, a swirling red cloak, sharp spikes sticking out of his wrists and a huge weapon in one hand got onto an elevator at the American International Toy Fair in New York City. "Can I have nine?" he asked the man closest to the controls. To which two passengers quickly replied: "You can have anything you want. " Which pretty much sums up the Toy Fair's approach to the world of play: You can have anything you want.
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