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FOOD
August 19, 1987 | Special to the Daily News
Use your microwave oven to quick-peel garlic, whether the garlic is intended for a microwave or conventional cooking recipe. Because the garlic will partially cook and become soft and less pungent, use this quick-peel technique for recipes that call for a mild garlic flavor. 1. Put a whole head of garlic on a plate or paper napkin. Microwave on high (100 percent power) for 20 seconds, turn head upside down and microwave on high 25 more seconds. The garlic is done when it "whistles.
FOOD
June 26, 1996 | by Aliza Green, Special to the Daily News
YO, CHEFS! I am a garlic lover and particularly love the taste of roasted garlic. However, my roasted garlic never tastes as good as that I've sampled at Baci Bistro on Broad Street. What is their secret to making their roasted garlic so tasty? Eve Thomas Oaklyn, N.J. Baci's chef, James Felton, starts by slicing about 1 inch off the top of a whole head of garlic. He then seasons the cut garlic with salt, pepper, a pinch of cayenne and a generous sprinkling of paprika.
FOOD
June 3, 1987 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: We grow our own garlic and were wondering if you have a recipe for making garlic powder. - Edward Dear Edward: Homemade granulated or powdered garlic can be made as a convenient way to store a bumper crop of garlic. Simply slice peeled garlic cloves thinly, then dry them in an oven set at the lowest possible temperature or in a microwave oven until the garlic is very dry and brittle. Then grind the garlic to the desired fineness in a coffee grinder, blender or food processor.
FOOD
October 20, 1993 | by Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Earthy and pungent, garlic was once considered an improper ingredient for food that would grace the tables of the well-bred, lest tender tastebuds be overwhelmed with flavor or - heaven forfend - gentle noses detect any lingering scent. Smelly food was the province of immigrants. In just a few generations, ethnic food - the more flavorful the better - has captured our culinary hearts. One reason is that hearty peasant fare has proven to be much more healthy than "refined" food.
FOOD
December 15, 1991 | By Elaine Tait, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
"Do you suppose we smell of garlic?" Tempted by the sweet, buttery and mild flavor, my review partner and I had devoured most of the big head of roasted garlic that came to the table with thick slices of super bread at Baci, a new Center City restaurant on the site of the old Apropos. My partner's question was answered mere seconds after the elevator at the office deposited me on my floor. "Garlic!" came the warning cry from the receptionist whose desk I was first to pass. Expect to hear that cry often.
SPORTS
March 31, 2003 | By Joe Logan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Tiger Woods' digestive problems last weekend, it turns out, were the result of eating pasta cooked by his girlfriend, who was apparently unaware that he is allergic to garlic. "Yeah, garlic," Woods said yesterday after his round, confirming reports that had been circulating all week. "Everybody on my father's side is [allergic]. " Although he feels fine now, Woods isn't playing next week's BellSouth Classic near Atlanta. Instead, he is heading home to Orlando, Fla., to hit the weight room to put back on the six pounds he lost while he was sick and fine-tune his game as he heads to Augusta, Ga., in two weeks for the Masters.
FOOD
July 22, 1987 | By POLLY FISHER, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: Can you give me a good oil and vinegar dressing recipe? I can't get the right proportions to make it taste good. I think maybe garlic and sugar should be added to it. - E.L.S. Dear E.L.S.: Seasonings are important to a good vinegar and oil dressing, but I think the most important factors are the proportion of oil to vinegar and the quality of the ingredients. A good wine vinegar or fresh lemon juice and excellent olive oil will make the best tasting dressing. The following garlic vinaigrette dressing tastes good on a variety of lettuces.
NEWS
May 1, 1987 | By SAM GUGINO, Daily News Restaurant Critic
I've never been to the Catskills, but the convivial communal dining hall atmosphere of Hesch's on a Saturday night is just how I envisioned Grossinger's. Owner Harry Katz (Hesch is Yiddish for Harry), having developed a dubious reputation as a kind of Harold Stassen of Philadelphia entrepreneurship, now seems to have a winner on the site of the old Frankie Bradley's. Katz clearly revels in his new found success, dapper as always, schmoozing with the clientele like a Jewish version of Casablanca Rick while offering samples of food as if the prodigious portions at Hesch's weren't already enough to send your body into hibernation.
FOOD
October 10, 1999 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
What: E-Z-Rol garlic peeler Manufacturer: The Omessi Group Ltd., Northridge, Calif. Where: Kitchen Kapers (all locations) Price: $7.99 Purpose: Peels raw garlic cloves This peeler, which looks like a soft plastic cannoli cylinder, will prove indispensable to anyone with a bumper crop of basil and a desire to turn it all into pesto before the first frost. The instructions are almost too easy to believe: Place one clove of raw garlic inside the flexible 5 1/2-inch tube and roll the tube on a flat surface with a gentle downward pressure until the garlic skin makes a crackling sound.
FOOD
September 4, 1991 | By Arthur Schwartz, New York Daily News
As a seasoning, garlic has no season. We love it on summer tomatoes, in fall soups, in winter stews and for dressing spring greens. We put it in pasta sauces and use it to enliven seafood, lamb, pork and chicken. Some of us think that it goes in every course but dessert. In the last decade or so, we've even taken to eating it for its own sake. The soft, sweet-nutty pulp of whole roasted heads and cooked unpeeled cloves has become part of America's new cooking - both in restaurants and at home.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 24, 2015 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
"Shrimp!" called out Angelica Marrero, 10, raising her fists in celebration as she entered the kitchen. She and her classmates at Sacred Heart School in Camden had been looking forward to this cooking lesson: shrimp with lemon garlic linguine. "I'm so excited for shrimp," she said. The students had flipped ahead in their cookbooks to see what recipes they would be making during the eight-week healthy-cooking class, and this was the one they were all waiting for. Last week, when Bryson Barnes, 10, said his mom made the dish with broccoli instead of peas, the other students wished for broccoli, too. So the volunteers, Ruth Biemer and Sylvia Wilson, two retired elementary-school teachers with decades of experience, taught the children a lesson before the class even started: A recipe need not be followed to the letter.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
The truck: The dumpling has landed, folks. The missing link in Philly's food-truck scene. Mobile. Boiled. Fried. Go traditional or branch out with a specialty. Also, there are spring rolls. Welcome to Dump-N-Roll, the sandwich-n-taco alternative. Taste test: Peter Tong, who has been cooking for about 10 years, including stints at Susanna Foo and Morimoto, agreed to whip up some dumplings for us yesterday at the mobile-food commissary in Brewerytown. We were not disappointed.
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Necessity, they say, is the mother of invention. It certainly can be the case in the kitchen, as my wife and I discovered a few years ago, when we were vacationing, as usual, in a cabin outside Tunkhannock in Wyoming County near the Poconos. This is a cabin with all the amenities, including a state-of-the-art grill on the deck overlooking a creek winding its way down Vosburg Neck to the Susquehanna River. Grilling is not my culinary long suit, though I can manage to turn out a half-decent steak.
NEWS
December 5, 2014
MEAT and potatoes offer a hearty entry into the big-eating, rib-sticking world of chef Ben Ford.   STANDING RIB ROAST For the roast: One 7-bone standing prime rib roast (16 to 18 pounds), trimmed and tied 10 garlic cloves, thinly sliced 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened Kosher salt and fresh coarsely ground black pepper For the jus: 2 cups red wine 10 fresh thyme sprigs 2 fresh rosemary sprigs 2 cups veal or beef stock 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper To prepare the roast, remove it from the refrigerator 30 minutes prior to cooking time and preheat the oven to 450°F.
FOOD
May 30, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'Do you know what processed food is?" I asked the fifth graders at Henry Lawton Elementary, where I've been teaching cooking classes. I had just seen Fed Up , the heartbreaking documentary on America's addiction to processed food, and I felt compelled to talk about it. "It's fake food," said Nick Rodriguez. "It's food that they put stuff in," said Aneza Abalo. "You're both right," I said. Processed food does not grow in the soil. It comes from factories where they add chemicals and ingredients that you can't pronounce, I told the kids.
FOOD
April 11, 2014 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
I should have known, when the sun was shining brightly on the first perfect spring afternoon after so many wicked winter days, that it would be tough for 10-year-olds to focus on cooking. On top of that, my fifth grade chefs had just completed six days of PSSA testing at Henry Lawton Elementary and they were having a hard time standing still, much less concentrating on one recipe - let alone two. Frankly, it would have been a good day to make scrambled eggs. But the plan, in my continuing quest for healthy, low-cost cooking, was to teach how to use up fresh ingredients - in this case, ginger, cilantro, and garlic - by employing them in more than one recipe: turkey lettuce wraps and corn salad.
NEWS
February 21, 2014 | BY LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
NINE-month-old Adler Ferrell was in the kitchen - a safe distance from the action, though - and watching intently as his mom, Jerrie Leone Ferrell, cooked dinner. Having a family audience is nothing new to Ferrell, who grew up in a large Italian family - two older brothers and a younger sister - in Jamison, Bucks County. Dinnertime brought everyone together, she recalled. "I remember a lot of pasta going on," Ferrell said. "There would also be a veal or chicken dish, and we always ended with fruit.
FOOD
December 13, 2013 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
'This looks like fish food," said Mark Ramirez, when he opened the bag of lentils we would be using to make soup. "Or the stuff you feed the ducks at the zoo. " None of the fifth graders in the cooking class at Bayard Taylor Elementary School in North Philadelphia had ever had lentils. "Do they taste like peas?" Kareema Brown asked. "Not really," I said. "They don't really have a strong taste, they take on the flavor of the things they're cooked with. But they are so good for you - full of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.
FOOD
May 16, 2013 | Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
The fish stays moist and looks lovely when presented in this light broth. To complete the meal, toss in a small amount of blanched fresh peas, snow peas, or haricots verts. Quick-Braised Snapper in Cilantro Broth 2 servings 1 clove garlic 1 shallot 1 lemon 2 teaspoons olive oil 3/4 cup no-salt-added chicken broth 1/4 cup packed cilantro leaves 1/4 teaspoon kosher or fine sea salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Two 6-ounce, skin-on red snapper fillets, pin bones removed 1. Mince the garlic and shallot.
FOOD
April 25, 2013
Makes 5 servings 10 bone-in chicken             thighs and    drumsticks, skin          removed ½ cup Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ teaspoon oregano 1.    Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Rinse the chicken and pat dry with paper towels. 2.    Combine the mustard, garlic, maple syrup, and oregano in a small bowl. 3.    Spread the mustard mixture evenly on top of each chicken thigh or drumstick, being careful to cover as much of the surface as possible to form a crust.
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