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Garlic

NEWS
June 1, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
For a moment, the South of Jersey had become the South of France. The twinkling glow of trees strung with lights framed the patio where we sat at Dream Cuisine. An illuminated church spire rose over the horizon. And as a gentle spring evening breeze rustled across our table, it carried the rippling sound of a fountain nearby. When the food arrived, the smell of seafood in garlic butter and tomato sauces piqued with Nicoise olives wafted up invitingly. I inhaled the aromas and poised my fork for a taste of Provence, when . . . " Happy birthday to you!
FOOD
April 21, 2011 | By Judy Hevrdejs, Chicago Tribune
When you spot pork tenderloins on sale, pick one up. Or two. You get almost zero waste and solid protein. Steer clear of the marinated versions; they don't offer the cook as many options. A pork tenderloin can be thinly sliced, then pounded into cutlets and breaded. Or cube the meat for kebabs. For a quick weekday meal - or a terrific entrée for dinner guests - a pork tenderloin delivers. Our version pairs the meat with dried fruit and a touch of garlic. Apricot Pork Tenderloin Makes 4 servings 1 pound pork tenderloin 1/2 teaspoon each: salt, cracked pepper 1/4 cup apricot preserves 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar or lemon juice 1 small clove garlic, pressed 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons olive oil 1/4 cup each: water, chopped dried apricots, chopped prunes 1. Pat tenderloin dry; rub with salt and pepper.
FOOD
January 9, 1991 | By Marc Schogol Compiled from reports from Inquirer wire services
THE HIGH LIFE The marijuana munchies - food cravings that users report - are for real. In an experiment, six men lived in a Johns Hopkins University lab for 13 days and smoked four joints daily. They unknowingly alternated three days of smoking real marijuana with three days of smoking placebo pot. During the periods when they smoked the real stuff, they ate 40 percent more calories in the form of snacks and gained nearly seven pounds. When they smoked the fakes, they lost the weight.
FOOD
September 3, 2000 | By Craig LaBan, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
It is the ultimate instrument of flavor in my repertoire of minimalist cooking. It is my definitive improv riff, capable of giving my late summer garden harvest a fragrant high-gloss sheen, or, satisfying my hunger as is, just plain. And though it is virtually invisible, a simple sauce of garlic and olive oil done right can be more memorable than all the dark stock and frothy butter sauces in France. Then again, aglio e olio is Italian. Aaaah-leo-ooooh-leo. It's as delicious to say as it is to eat. So why, I've often wondered, is it so hard to find a proper rendition in restaurants?
FOOD
November 7, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
Bobbi Katz has been making her incredibly good hummus for nearly 20 years, but instead of stirring up a batch to take to a party, she's making it in vats these days. And sending it to supermarkets. Harriet's Favorite Hummus, which won a Philadelphia Magazine "Best of Philly" award this year, is not your traditional, find-it-in-any-veggie- cookbook hummus. Sure it has lots of chickpeas, garlic, fresh-squeezed lemon juice and a little olive oil . . . but there's also ginseng in it. And it's missing tahini - sesame seed butter - which means it's lower in fat than many other hummus recipes and more lemony tasting.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
When I was a little kid, I dreaded the regular family visits to Auntie's flat. Auntie was a great-aunt, my grandmother's only sister. She was a widow and lived on Chicago's Northwest Side when the neighborhood was filled with Eastern European immigrants. Actually, she was a fine, affectionate old lady, with enormous energy. She scrubbed her floors every day. And there were always wonderful meals bubbling on her stove. But when I was told we were going to see Auntie, which happened about every two or three weeks, I had to be almost dragged onto the streetcar.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
You will not get the third-degree at the FBI at 25th and Olive streets in Fairmount. All they'll ask is what you want on your bagel. FBI stands for the just-opened Fairmount Bagel Institute. The sign says, "Home of the Bull Bagel. " What's a bull bagel? It's one with every topping on it - garlic, poppy seeds, onion, you name it. The supremely fresh bagels, 40 cents each, are the size of a small catcher's mitt, and they're softer than most bagels. Varieties include plain, onion, garlic, poppy seed, cinnamon raisin, pumpernickel and honey wheat.
FOOD
February 5, 1992 | By Donna Deane, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Do you love the flavor of those homey bean soups that take hours to cook? Here's a shortcut vegetarian version of the classic white bean soup that can be prepared in less than 30 minutes. The trick is to use canned Great Northern beans and canned chicken broth. Sauteed garlic, onion, carrot and tomato are added for flavor along with fresh sage, which is available in the produce section of most supermarkets. It can be easily recognized by the distinctive spongy texture of its tapering gray-green leaves.
FOOD
March 31, 2011
Makes about 2 cups or 32 servings 13/4 pounds red jalapeño peppers, stems removed and halved lengthwise 3 cloves garlic 2 tablespoons garlic powder, plus more as needed 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon light-brown sugar 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar, plus more as needed Water, as needed ...
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