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Garlic

FOOD
November 7, 1990 | By Libby Goldstein, Special to the Daily News
Bobbi Katz has been making her incredibly good hummus for nearly 20 years, but instead of stirring up a batch to take to a party, she's making it in vats these days. And sending it to supermarkets. Harriet's Favorite Hummus, which won a Philadelphia Magazine "Best of Philly" award this year, is not your traditional, find-it-in-any-veggie- cookbook hummus. Sure it has lots of chickpeas, garlic, fresh-squeezed lemon juice and a little olive oil . . . but there's also ginseng in it. And it's missing tahini - sesame seed butter - which means it's lower in fat than many other hummus recipes and more lemony tasting.
FOOD
October 16, 2015 | Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Andy's Chicken is no fast-food joint. Despite the nonstop buzz behind the counter of its no-frills take-out corner, this red-hot Fishtown newcomer may, in fact, be the slowest Korean fried chicken take-out operation in the city, obliging a call-ahead order at least a half-hour in advance, and, if my experience was typical, an extra 15 minutes of patience on top of that. But it's worth the logistical challenge. Because Andy's is easily one of the best in this recent wave of new K.F.C.
FOOD
February 13, 2015 | By Frank Wilson, For The Inquirer
Necessity, they say, is the mother of invention. It certainly can be the case in the kitchen, as my wife and I discovered a few years ago, when we were vacationing, as usual, in a cabin outside Tunkhannock in Wyoming County near the Poconos. This is a cabin with all the amenities, including a state-of-the-art grill on the deck overlooking a creek winding its way down Vosburg Neck to the Susquehanna River. Grilling is not my culinary long suit, though I can manage to turn out a half-decent steak.
NEWS
March 20, 2015
The truck: The dumpling has landed, folks. The missing link in Philly's food-truck scene. Mobile. Boiled. Fried. Go traditional or branch out with a specialty. Also, there are spring rolls. Welcome to Dump-N-Roll, the sandwich-n-taco alternative. Taste test: Peter Tong, who has been cooking for about 10 years, including stints at Susanna Foo and Morimoto, agreed to whip up some dumplings for us yesterday at the mobile-food commissary in Brewerytown. We were not disappointed.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | BY MIKE ROYKO
When I was a little kid, I dreaded the regular family visits to Auntie's flat. Auntie was a great-aunt, my grandmother's only sister. She was a widow and lived on Chicago's Northwest Side when the neighborhood was filled with Eastern European immigrants. Actually, she was a fine, affectionate old lady, with enormous energy. She scrubbed her floors every day. And there were always wonderful meals bubbling on her stove. But when I was told we were going to see Auntie, which happened about every two or three weeks, I had to be almost dragged onto the streetcar.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1990 | By Maria Gallagher, Daily News Restaurant Critic
You will not get the third-degree at the FBI at 25th and Olive streets in Fairmount. All they'll ask is what you want on your bagel. FBI stands for the just-opened Fairmount Bagel Institute. The sign says, "Home of the Bull Bagel. " What's a bull bagel? It's one with every topping on it - garlic, poppy seeds, onion, you name it. The supremely fresh bagels, 40 cents each, are the size of a small catcher's mitt, and they're softer than most bagels. Varieties include plain, onion, garlic, poppy seed, cinnamon raisin, pumpernickel and honey wheat.
FOOD
July 3, 2008 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Tempt your family with juicy, Sicilian-style swordfish steak. Tomatoes, olives and garlic are staples of zesty Sicilian cooking. Raisins add sweetness and a tantalizing contrast. The sauce for the fish can be made in a microwave to save time cooking and in cleanup. Tuna, halibut or grouper can be used in place of swordfish. Sicilian Swordfish Makes two servings 1. Place tomatoes, garlic, olives, raisins and oregano in a microwave-safe bowl. Cover with a paper towel and microwave on high 3 minutes.
FOOD
February 5, 1992 | By Donna Deane, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Do you love the flavor of those homey bean soups that take hours to cook? Here's a shortcut vegetarian version of the classic white bean soup that can be prepared in less than 30 minutes. The trick is to use canned Great Northern beans and canned chicken broth. Sauteed garlic, onion, carrot and tomato are added for flavor along with fresh sage, which is available in the produce section of most supermarkets. It can be easily recognized by the distinctive spongy texture of its tapering gray-green leaves.
FOOD
March 31, 2011
Makes about 2 cups or 32 servings 13/4 pounds red jalapeƱo peppers, stems removed and halved lengthwise 3 cloves garlic 2 tablespoons garlic powder, plus more as needed 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon kosher salt, plus more as needed 1 tablespoon light-brown sugar 1/2 cup distilled white vinegar, plus more as needed Water, as needed ...
FOOD
February 12, 1992 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
How often have you peered into the cupboard or refrigerator, scratched your head and declared: "There's nothing here to eat!"? Well, most of those times, there probably was a real meal lurking among those seemingly pedestrian staples, just waiting to be found. Arthur Schwartz, restaurant critic for the New York Daily News, gives expert advice on finding those elusive dishes in What to Cook When You Think There's Nothing in the House to Eat (Harper, $15 paperback). "This is not a fancy food cookbook," Schwartz writes.
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