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Garment District

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NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mabel E. Spence Brash, 94, godmother of retired Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin L. Powell, who worked much of her life in New York City's garment district, died Sunday at Care Inn of Voorhees. Mrs. Brash was born in Savanna la Mar, Jamaica, where she became friends with the general's mother, the late Maud McKoy Powell. Both came to the United States as young women and eventually found jobs in New York City's garment district. She moved from the Bronx to Voorhees in 1988.
NEWS
August 25, 1988 | By GABRIEL ESCOBAR, Daily News Staff Writer
A ringside seat for Mike Tyson's latest bout was chic and cheap: All you had to do was stand on the sidewalk between La Chavita Deli and the Red Star Chinese Kitchen. That's where Dapper Dan's Boutique in Harlem is. That's right, boutique. Where customized Mercedes-Benzes triple-park and gawkers wait for rap stars to saunter in and try on their custom-made leather jackets. The undisputed heavyweight champion of the world was waiting for his $800 leather jacket and matching shorts - a Dapper Dan special - when Mitch "Blood" Green came in and the now-celebrated tiff took place.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Six months ago, former Philadelphian Bob Bland opened a fashion incubator in New York City's Garment District where emerging designers could hash out ideas, compare notes on notions, and learn how to build profitable brands. Now, Manufacture New York is aiming by year's end to open its $3.5 million, 160,000-square-foot Brooklyn Manufacturing Center. There, designers will be able to do what Philadelphia-based artists can only wish for: produce the exact number of pieces they need (with only reasonable minimums to meet)
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 2,000 protesters gathered in front of the Staples Center yesterday on the final day of the Democratic National Convention, but while their presence during Vice President Gore's acceptance speech brought out massive police, the group dispersed calmly when officers asked them to do so. As delegates began to leave the center, demonstrators formed an impromptu march to the county jail to show solidarity with other demonstrators. The LAPD allowed the protest, which did not have a permit, to continue but city officers and California Highway Patrol officers in full riot gear lined the route past major hotels.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Grover C. Hallman, 92, formerly of Chester Springs, a retired district manager for UGI Corp., died of heart failure Thursday, April 14, at Freedom Village, a retirement community in West Brandywine. Mr. Hallman graduated from Norristown High School, where he was a pitcher on the baseball team. He then was a railroad worker and worked in the garment district in New York City. During World War II, he was a pilot in the Army Air Force and flew B-12 bombers in the Pacific. After the war, he served in the Air Force Reserve and for many years recruited students from the Philadelphia area as a liaison officer for the Air Force Academy.
NEWS
October 18, 1986 | By Colman McCarthy
To the unpracticed eye, nothing appeared out of order. The neighborhood along 8th Avenue, near the intersection of 42nd Street and west of Bay Ridge, is a mix of Hispanic and Asian working-class families that on this sunny Saturday afternoon had come to shop at the local stores. A closer look at the scene revealed that this was a neighborhood of exploitation and suffering. Many of the stores were sweatshops. They carried no identification over the doorways and no markings on the windows.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abish Hopenwasser never expected to live to 100. But here he is, 102 years old and 31 years removed from his retirement as a tailor doing piecework in New York's garment district. It is hard enough planning for retirement when you figure you will live 20 or 25 more years. How do you support leisure years that span three decades or more? It is no idle query. There are 50,000 centenarians in the United States, according to the U.S. Census, and the United Nations projects that by 2050 the number will grow to 298,000.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | by Mike Downey
As soon as I heard what Philadelphia's mayor had to say about Los Angeles after his recent visit, I concluded that the Liberty Bell wasn't the only thing in his city that was cracked. He took a simple jaywalking incident and ran with it, practically making L.A. out to be the city of brotherly hate. But later it occurred to me that perhaps the Philly gentleman doesn't understand our town, and how we do things differently here. After all, there are 2,700 miles and a number of fundamental philosophical differences between us. For example, we don't have as many pedestrians as Philadelphia has. But the ones we do have tend to cross the street at the corner, not in the middle.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That wiry little guy behind the counter in the small, cluttered dry cleaning shop was once a bodyguard and food taster for Joseph Stalin. He is Alexander Contract, a rabbi's son and sometime singer and actor. He was once "Heinzie," a champion soccer player in Germany, and once a vice president of the Association of the United States Army, and once an "Irish" shopkeeper in New York City. But that's all in the past, says this nattily dressed, 71-year-old gent with the cane and the wispy brown hair and the Yiddish accent that can instantly become an Irish brogue.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Karin Kasdin FOR THE INQUIRER
Gerald Shur has spent a lifetime trying to understand the criminal mind. The Bucks County resident has never been short on research subjects. Shur was the mastermind behind the creation of the federal witness-protection program, and throughout his 34 years with the Department of Justice, he thrust himself into the lives of the most vicious kingpins of organized crime in America. Now retired, Shur, 74, can finally talk about his past, the program he founded, and the veil of secrecy under which he lived most of his adult life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
NEW YORK - Six months ago, former Philadelphian Bob Bland opened a fashion incubator in New York City's Garment District where emerging designers could hash out ideas, compare notes on notions, and learn how to build profitable brands. Now, Manufacture New York is aiming by year's end to open its $3.5 million, 160,000-square-foot Brooklyn Manufacturing Center. There, designers will be able to do what Philadelphia-based artists can only wish for: produce the exact number of pieces they need (with only reasonable minimums to meet)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
A lady will surely opt for a machine-washable flirty frock over frumpy frippery any day, or evening, or day-to-evening. That's the idea behind Laundrea, the Aston, Delaware County-based dress line founded by new mom Rachel Godwin Becker. Becker, 25, a former assistant bridal designer, introduced her collection of made-in-America basic sheaths, wraps, and sassy A-lines in March. The pieces - all manufactured in New York's Garment District - are available in 18 stores nationwide, including Jennifer on the Avenue in Berwyn and Sorella Boutique in Media.
NEWS
April 22, 2011 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Grover C. Hallman, 92, formerly of Chester Springs, a retired district manager for UGI Corp., died of heart failure Thursday, April 14, at Freedom Village, a retirement community in West Brandywine. Mr. Hallman graduated from Norristown High School, where he was a pitcher on the baseball team. He then was a railroad worker and worked in the garment district in New York City. During World War II, he was a pilot in the Army Air Force and flew B-12 bombers in the Pacific. After the war, he served in the Air Force Reserve and for many years recruited students from the Philadelphia area as a liaison officer for the Air Force Academy.
NEWS
July 20, 2008 | By Karin Kasdin FOR THE INQUIRER
Gerald Shur has spent a lifetime trying to understand the criminal mind. The Bucks County resident has never been short on research subjects. Shur was the mastermind behind the creation of the federal witness-protection program, and throughout his 34 years with the Department of Justice, he thrust himself into the lives of the most vicious kingpins of organized crime in America. Now retired, Shur, 74, can finally talk about his past, the program he founded, and the veil of secrecy under which he lived most of his adult life.
BUSINESS
May 12, 2005 | By Virginia A. Smith INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Abish Hopenwasser never expected to live to 100. But here he is, 102 years old and 31 years removed from his retirement as a tailor doing piecework in New York's garment district. It is hard enough planning for retirement when you figure you will live 20 or 25 more years. How do you support leisure years that span three decades or more? It is no idle query. There are 50,000 centenarians in the United States, according to the U.S. Census, and the United Nations projects that by 2050 the number will grow to 298,000.
NEWS
December 14, 2001 | By Jane M. Von Bergen INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's how rich and generous Sidney Kimmel is: When a visitor from Philadelphia asked him about the "Kimmel Center," the apparel magnate responded with a blank look. Why? Because the man has bankrolled four Kimmel Centers. Which one? The Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, which opens tonight in Philadelphia. Kimmel's $30 million gift to the Philadelphia Orchestra's new $265 million home made him the top individual donor. The Kimmel Cancer Center at Thomas Jefferson University, named after Kimmel in honor of a $10 million donation.
NEWS
August 25, 2000 | by Mike Downey
As soon as I heard what Philadelphia's mayor had to say about Los Angeles after his recent visit, I concluded that the Liberty Bell wasn't the only thing in his city that was cracked. He took a simple jaywalking incident and ran with it, practically making L.A. out to be the city of brotherly hate. But later it occurred to me that perhaps the Philly gentleman doesn't understand our town, and how we do things differently here. After all, there are 2,700 miles and a number of fundamental philosophical differences between us. For example, we don't have as many pedestrians as Philadelphia has. But the ones we do have tend to cross the street at the corner, not in the middle.
NEWS
August 18, 2000 | By Nita Lelyveld, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
About 2,000 protesters gathered in front of the Staples Center yesterday on the final day of the Democratic National Convention, but while their presence during Vice President Gore's acceptance speech brought out massive police, the group dispersed calmly when officers asked them to do so. As delegates began to leave the center, demonstrators formed an impromptu march to the county jail to show solidarity with other demonstrators. The LAPD allowed the protest, which did not have a permit, to continue but city officers and California Highway Patrol officers in full riot gear lined the route past major hotels.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mabel E. Spence Brash, 94, godmother of retired Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Colin L. Powell, who worked much of her life in New York City's garment district, died Sunday at Care Inn of Voorhees. Mrs. Brash was born in Savanna la Mar, Jamaica, where she became friends with the general's mother, the late Maud McKoy Powell. Both came to the United States as young women and eventually found jobs in New York City's garment district. She moved from the Bronx to Voorhees in 1988.
NEWS
May 20, 1993 | By John Corr, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
That wiry little guy behind the counter in the small, cluttered dry cleaning shop was once a bodyguard and food taster for Joseph Stalin. He is Alexander Contract, a rabbi's son and sometime singer and actor. He was once "Heinzie," a champion soccer player in Germany, and once a vice president of the Association of the United States Army, and once an "Irish" shopkeeper in New York City. But that's all in the past, says this nattily dressed, 71-year-old gent with the cane and the wispy brown hair and the Yiddish accent that can instantly become an Irish brogue.
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