IN THE NEWS

Gas

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 18, 2000 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
A late-night theft netted three tanks of nitrous oxide gas from Nazareth Hospital over the weekend. Police are still looking for the culprits. The theft may be the latest sign of the growing abuse of laughing gas. While the gas, known as laughing gas, is used as an anesthetic when mixed with oxygen in hospitals, some Philadelphians have other ideas. In recent weeks, the Daily News has called attention to a dangerous use for the gas at Eagles football tailgating parties, where fans load tanks into their cars and inhale to get high.
NEWS
January 22, 1997 | YONG KIM/ DAILY NEWS
Peco workers examine the leveled house of Gerard and Mary Jurosky in Glenolden, Delaware County, yesterday. A crack in the gas main caused the home on Glenolden Avenue to explode at midnight Monday, according to a Peco spokesman. No one was hurt in the blast.
NEWS
March 11, 1990 | By John Ellis, Special to The Inquirer
A stench that wafted over a Plymouth Township neighborhood Wednesday evening, causing residents' eyes to water, turned out to be tear gas, police said. About 6:22 p.m., police were called to the 100 block of Pleasant Road to check out reports of a strange odor, said Plymouth Detective Robert Kerstetter. Steven J. McBride, a patrolman, was investigating the odor when he was overcome by fumes, which were strong at the time, Kerstetter said. He added that McBride was fine after getting fresh air. Police then combed the area with air packs on. They discovered a tear gas cannister that had been ignited and tossed into the back yard of a residence in the 800 block of Clover Lane, adjacent to Pleasant Road.
NEWS
July 28, 2008
RE THE DEBATE I started about saving fuel with bigger radiators: The Daily News left out that you could save gas by running your car on a leaner mixture from the carburetor when the cars had them during the '70s. The car would overheat, but if you had a bigger fan and radiator, you could drive all day like that. During WWII, the Japanese reduced the fuel that their aircraft used in half by using a leaner mixture, and we also increased the range by doing this with our aircraft when they were low on fuel.
NEWS
September 25, 2006
MAYOR STREET fiercely defended PGW management (whose governing board he appointed) for its secret payment of $500,000 to its utility managers? You can't be serious! Imagine that! Mayor Street defending a secret, backdoor payment. I'm shocked! Seriously, who would have ever thought such a thing could happen? Well, now I've heard everything. (Insert sarcastic inflections wherever you see fit.) Brian McGuire, Drexel Hill
NEWS
May 17, 2007
WHEN WILL THE media and our elected officials stop sounding like PR reps for Big Oil? First it was the Gulf War that made prices jump, then Katrina, then the shortage due to refinery failure. And we can't forget the necessary shortage while the oil companies changed from the "winter mix" to the "summer mix. " Did anybody notice that prices changed while the oil was still in the tanks? I passed one station at about 10 a.m., and the price was $2.89. When I passed that same station two hours later, gas was $2.91 a gallon.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
A request for a variance and a special exception by the owner of a service station at York Road and Ninth Avenue in Warminster has drawn a mixed reaction from the Warminster Township Zoning Hearing Board. Joseph Sweeney of Glenside, the owner of Warminster Getty, requested a variance to install a new gas pump island with a canopy, and a special exception to construct a new service-station building 25 percent larger than the existing one. The existing building would be demolished.
NEWS
August 10, 2006
ABUTTERFLY flaps its wings in Brazil, and the price of gasoline goes up $3 a gallon. How long must the American people put up with such blatant price-gouging? The big oil companies reap their outrageous profits while raping us all! And where are our brave journalists while Rome burns? Covering fluff stories, and every second of the Eagles like it was the end of the world, which it just might be. How about a little investigative reporting like the old days! Robert Phantom Philadelphia
NEWS
May 3, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
A gas main break closed a major thoroughfare in Northeast Philadelphia near I-95 in Frankford for more than an hour during this morning's rush hour. The break in a 6-inch gas main at Aramingo Avenue and Wakeling Street was reported before 7 a.m. and the Fire Department declared the situation under control at 8:10 a.m. Police closed Aramingo Avenue between Tacony and Bridge Streets and blocked surrounding streets, snarling traffic in that section of Frankford and adjoining Bridesburg while work to repair the main was under way. No injuries were reported.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Q: When I wake up, my stomach is bloated and full of gas. The gas I pass is loud and long, and embarrassing, but it hurts if I hold it in. What can I do about it? A: First, some gas in the gastrointestinal tract is absolutely normal. It is estimated the average healthy person passes gas around 10 to 20 times a day! Gas in the small and large intestines usually comes from the action of bacteria on one's food. Bacteria use food for energy and produce various gases such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 23, 2016
ISSUE | AIR POLLUTION Dangers of natural-gas emissions The recent study linking excess air pollution in Philadelphia to 126 deaths and 284 hospitalizations should be a wake-up call to our policymakers about the human toll of failing to enact strong environmental protections (" Study: Phila.'s bad air tied to 126 early deaths ," Aug. 11). As a physician, I'm not surprised. The health hazards of ground-level ozone have been well-documented for some time. But we cannot fully address ozone without stopping air pollution from natural-gas infrastructure - something the Environmental Protection Agency is working to address.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
An industrial gas producer has agreed to pay $1 million to settle air-emissions violations at its northwestern Montgomery County plant, the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection announced Wednesday. Matheson Tri-Gas Inc. agreed to settle charges that it operated its plant on Stauffer Road in Upper Hanover Township without proper permits for five years after buying the facility from Advanced Gas Technologies. The rural plant produces high-purity specialty cylinder gases, primarily propylene.
NEWS
August 16, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A controversial and much-litigated natural gas pipeline project will likely face new challenges next week when the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection hosts the first of two wetlands hearings related to the proposed "Southern Reliability Link" route. New Jersey Natural Gas (NJNG) is seeking to build a 30-mile, 30-inch pipeline that would start in Chesterfield Township in Burlington County, pass through protected Pinelands on Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, and terminate in Manchester Township in Ocean County.
NEWS
August 14, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Highland Township, a tiny Elk County town that in 2013 approved an ordinance banning natural-gas wastewater injection wells, overturned the ordinance this week and promptly settled a federal lawsuit with a Marcellus Shale gas producer that wants to build a disposal well in the community. Two new supervisors on the township's three-member governing board voted Wednesday to rescind the ordinance, saying they were unlikely to prevail in a lawsuit with gas producer Seneca Resources Corp.
NEWS
August 13, 2016 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
In November, Zachary Bird was hanging out in the 'burbs with his dad, Bill, when he saw the light. The handsome, 10-foot, cast-iron Victorian lamp with a crown in the motif of acanthus leaves sparked a conversation - and that led to a quest, more modest than Sir Galahad's, but no less epic for the 46-year-old Zack. Traveling deep into the web, Zack learned intimately about Victorian gas lamps (down to the 1891 Welsbach patent for the gas mantle), discovered connections to Disneyland and a dentist/pilot/businessman/collector, followed leads to Cape May County, and traversed a field of dreams in South Jersey.
NEWS
August 9, 2016 | By David O'Reilly, Staff Writer
A $500 million project that New Jersey environmental officials say would radically reduce the air pollution spewing from a South Jersey power plant has drawn only angry boos from environmental groups. The Department of Environmental Protection's recent issuance of a permit allowing the B.L. England electric generation plant in Cape May County to convert from coal-fired to gas-fired is "a sellout for clean air," the Sierra Club said last week. "Another nail in the coffin for the Christie administration's denial of carbon pollution," said Doug O'Malley, the director of Environment New Jersey, who called the plant a "fossil fuel dinosaur.
NEWS
August 3, 2016
With his presidential and vice presidential ambitions dashed for at least another four years, one might expect Gov. Christie to stop paying homage to political expediency and make a statesmanlike decision about raising New Jersey's gasoline tax. But he still can't find the high road. Highway projects from Newark to Cape May ground to a halt more than three weeks ago, when Christie, rather than agree to a gas tax hike to replenish the depleted Transportation Trust Fund, decided to stop all spending.
BUSINESS
August 1, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, Staff Writer
Summer gasoline prices across the nation have dropped to their lowest mark since 2004. AAA says the "best news" is that many motorists are once again paying less than $2 a gallon. But don't expect any bargains soon at the Lukoil on Ridge Pike at Chemical Road in Conshohocken, where the price for regular was stubbornly stuck at $2.999 a gallon recently. "Are you saying it should be priced lower?" asked Tom Hutchinson, the dealer-franchisee. He refers disgruntled consumers to a toll-free Lukoil customer service number posted on the window of the convenience store.
NEWS
July 24, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey's top two Democrats say they have reached an agreement to replenish the state's fund for road and bridge repairs by raising the gas tax, possibly breaking a political impasse that has brought construction on transportation projects to a halt. Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) and Assembly Speaker Vincent Prieto (D., Hudson) announced a plan Friday to more than double the gas tax to 37.5 cents per gallon while also cutting taxes on estates and retirement income for seniors, and boosting a tax credit for the working poor.
NEWS
July 15, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Independent Fiscal Office estimates that Marcellus Shale impact-fee revenue in 2016 will decline for a third consecutive year because of the continuing slowdown in gas drilling and low natural gas prices. IFO, in a research brief set to be released on Thursday, said the impact fee will decline as little as $5.4 million next year if drilling activity accelerates during the last half of 2016. The impact fee could also plunge by $56.5 million - 30 percent - if the average NYMEX gas price averages below $2.25 per thousand cubic fee average for the year.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|