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Gas Masks

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NEWS
October 2, 2001 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A new shipment of 500 gas masks arrived at the Original I. Goldberg military-surplus store on Chestnut Street yesterday, and though the protection they offered might be more talismanic than technological, a steady stream of customers was buying them. Derek Connolly bought eight, paying $213.91, tax included. He said four masks were for him, his girlfriend, his mother and his stepfather, and the other four were for someone who works with his mother - the family worrier, who called to tell him that Goldberg's shipment had finally arrived.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | Daily News Wire Services
Israelis, worried by Iraq's chemical weapons threat, lined up yesterday for the biggest distribution of gas masks since World War II. The army, under orders to allocate kits to all 4.7 million Jews and Arabs in Israel, began with the 30,000 residents of Yokneam, Kfar Yona and Ofakim in the north, center and south of the country. "I'm very excited," said Irit Dahan, as she smiled a hesitant smile at her husband and their three young children in Kfar Yona. "We're afraid of Saddam Hussein and the gas. " Israel delayed distribution for two months after Iraq seized Kuwait in August.
NEWS
January 20, 1991 | By Richard V. Sabatini, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fears of a Mideast war sparked a run on gas mask sales to the point where by Wednesday both Original I. Goldberg stores - one at Franklin Mills mall and the other at 902 Chestnut St. - were sold out and awaiting new supplies. Most buyers said they would send the masks to friends and relatives overseas. Nanna Goldberg, vice president of the company, said both of the family- owned stores "have been getting calls for them for quite some time now. But sales have surged within the last week.
NEWS
September 27, 2001 | By Andrea Gerlin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
At the Camping & Government Surplus store near Victoria Station yesterday, few customers were interested in mosquito nets or camouflage clothing. Everyone, it seemed, wanted a gas mask or a protective suit. "They're frightened, obviously, and they're panicking," said owner Howard Davis, who was turning away customers after he sold the 50 gas masks he had in stock yesterday. "I suppose they want to be prepared. " With Britons fearing they could be the target of a biological or chemical attack by terrorists, military surplus stores here have been overrun.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1991 | By Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer
Where do you get gas masks? What kind of shortwave radio do you need to bring in broadcasts from the Middle East? As Philadelphians turn their attention to the events in the Persian Gulf, shoppers are looking for those items and are even snapping up military fatigue outfits, retailers say. For other people, the safety of their savings is paramount, according to local bankers. They say that even before bombs hit Baghdad, they saw a move into insured investments by many customers.
NEWS
October 16, 1990 | By Carol Morello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The desert wind, called a khamseen, blew into Jerusalem yesterday, spreading a dust so fine it looked as if a smoky gas had enveloped the city. Through the khamseen mist, Dana Avriel made her way to the Jerusalem Convention Center with her 10-month-old daughter to pick up a government- issued gas mask and a contraption called a "protective carryall for toddlers" to use should Saddam Hussein ever unleash his deadly chemical gas on Israel....
NEWS
October 5, 2001 | By Murray Dubin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Even as some people across the region are buying gas masks and stocking up on antibiotics that they think will save their lives, experts are saying those steps won't save anyone from bioterrorism. "I'd like to tell you to have an antiterrorism kit with you at home, but I don't know what that kit should have in it," said Maria Smith, a spokeswoman for the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency in Harrisburg. "There's very little that individuals can do," said Luciana Boria, a physician at the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense.
NEWS
September 18, 2001 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As Israelis marked the start of the Jewish New Year yesterday, they were wary of new violence linked to last week's terrorist attacks in the United States. For the first time in Israeli history, armed guards were deployed at every synagogue. Black-clad members of police antiterror units, carrying submachine guns, rode motorcycles down Jerusalem's Jaffa Road, temporarily renamed "New York Street" to show solidarity with the United States. As they did a decade ago, during the Persian Gulf war, Israelis prepared their gas masks, fearing attack from Iraq or other Arab nations.
NEWS
February 10, 1991 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
Despite the wailing of missile-attack sirens and the need to carry gas masks, student life is getting back to normal, relatively speaking, at Jerusalem Elwyn in Israel. Jerusalem Elwyn provides day and residential programs for about 700 children and adults who have mental and physical disabilities. It is managed by Elwyn Inc. of Media. "It's not normal to go with gas masks; it's as normal as possible," said David Marcu, director of the North American office of Jerusalem Elwyn.
NEWS
January 23, 1991 | By Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
Journalists in Saudi Arabia, reporting live for network television, grab gas masks as the air raid sirens whine. Civilians in Israel sling gas masks over their shoulders as they go off to work or the market. But are the gas masks enough protection if Iraq should resort to chemical warfare? Not necessarily. It would depend on whether Iraq would be spewing the air with nerve gas or with mustard gas. And there's no way of telling - until it's too late. "Nerve gas can be absorbed through the skin or the respiratory tract.
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NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writers
At least one student was sent to a hospital Tuesday afternoon following a leak of chemical gas into the air in a Villanova University science center. The leak occurred about 2:30 in a third-floor chemistry laboratory in the Mendel Science Center, where freshman chemistry students were synthesizing esters - chemical compounds, a staff member said. A student became ill, and classmates initially believed she was having an asthma attack, police said. Then her nose began to bleed, and other students felt faint and nauseated, and experienced tightness in their chests, police said.
SPORTS
April 6, 2011 | By MIKE KERN, kernm@phillynews.com
AUGUSTA, Ga. - Lee Westwood's trip here from Houston on Sunday night didn't exactly get off to the smoothest start. But the good news is, it finally got off. When his flight left the ground, it didn't take long to figure out something was wrong. In this instance, the sure sign was smoke in the cabin. "So the pilots donned the gas masks or whatever, oxygen masks, and turned it around fairly quickly, quicker than you would do normally and brought it down fast," Westwood recounted yesterday at Augusta National, where he will be trying to win his first major starting tomorrow.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By JAN RANSOM, ransomj@phillynews.com 215-854-5218
SHOTS RANG out shortly after dawn outside the schoolhouse where Army veteran Joshua Levy was stationed, helping to take back the Iraqi town of Baqubah, which had been overrun by insurgents. Levy's infantry squad lost a couple of people that day in 2007, one of the worst battles he'd seen. A day after President Obama spoke from the Oval Office to announce the end of combat operations in the seven-year war in Iraq, Levy - a four-year Army veteran - was among a group of local Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who visited the Philadelphia Zoo yesterday to reflect on their experiences, discuss Obama's decision to pull out combat troops and learn about benefits provided to veterans.
NEWS
April 9, 2009 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Charles Goldberg, 87, of Wynnewood, chairman of I. Goldberg, the venerable Army-Navy store on Chestnut Street, died of a heart attack yesterday at Bryn Mawr Terrace. For more than 50 years, Mr. Goldberg presided over three floors of merchandise that at any given time included Norwegian helmets, World War II Soviet overcoats, bobblehead Marines, Royal Air Force bush jackets, German army nightshirts, and gas masks - as well as practical rain ponchos and camping gear. Since 2004, Mr. Goldberg, who had Parkinson's disease, worked on the lower level with the military-surplus inventory.
NEWS
July 27, 2006 | By JOEL S. MOLDOVSKY
WE AREN'T sleeping - yet - in the basement shelter here in Netanya, Israel. But in northern Israel, they are. The rockets haven't yet fallen here, but more than 1,000 have in the north. The Home Front Command has told us who live in the center of the country to be on high alert and always near a shelter. From the time the sirens sound, we shall have just one minute to get into a shelter, under a stairwell or lie down on the ground before the rockets hit. In the north, people have been told to stay in their shelters round the clock.
NEWS
April 9, 2003 | By Harry Wolf
Despite the war in Iraq, the Tikvah Tour for Israel, a rite of passage for some 11th-grade students, is still scheduled for August. We have decided to allow our 17-year-old son to go. Our son will climb Masada, swim in the Dead Sea, meet an Israeli family in its home, and go to a disco in Jerusalem to socialize with other youths. About 2,500 teenagers from all over the world will be visiting at the same time, but it looks like fewer from the United States will take part than in previous years.
NEWS
April 3, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As U.S.-led forces advance on Baghdad, Israel is looking again at western Iraq with an eye on its own security. "We still do not know exactly where the missiles are and how much the coalition forces control western Iraq," a senior defense official said after a parliamentary briefing this week by Brig. Gen. Yossi Kupperwasser, director of Israeli army intelligence. "It is still too early to determine whether the danger has passed. " Kupperwasser told the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee that the chances of a missile attack on Israel from western Iraq remain small.
NEWS
March 12, 2003 | By Kathy Boccella INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Add these modern-day concerns to the list of such normal childhood fears as monsters and dark bedrooms: nuclear bombs and chemical weapons. That's what many of the children in Kate O'Shea's fifth-grade class at Wissahickon Charter School said they worried about these days. Also preying on their minds are ghastly images of oil fields blowing up, bombs bursting over Philadelphia, and relatives in the military getting killed. These 10- and 11-year-olds worry, too, about Iraqi children.
NEWS
March 7, 2003 | By Jessica Guynn INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Critics are asking whether the military's equipment and training would protect U.S. forces from biological or chemical weapons in a war with Iraq. Sens. Russell D. Feingold (D., Wis.), Dianne Feinstein (D., Calif.) and six other senators yesterday expressed strong concern in a letter to Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld. "We are concerned that . . . training and preparedness for confronting the harrowing threat of chemical and biological warfare lags behind the pace of deployment" of forces, the letter said.
NEWS
February 13, 2003 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Concerned and confused, Philadelphia-area residents filled shopping carts with duct tape, plastic sheeting and bottled water yesterday, and contemplated the grim possibility they might have to seal themselves in their homes to ride out catastrophe. People said they were acting on recommendations issued by federal authorities to prepare for chemical, biological or radiological attack. The run on supplies began after the government upgraded the nation's threat level last week from yellow to orange.
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