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NEWS
April 7, 1989 | By John Way Jennings, Inquirer Staff Writer
A pickup jumped the curb of the parking lot at the Berlin Farmers Market yesterday and rolled more than 300 feet down the sidewalk, severing two natural gas meters from the outside wall of the mall, Berlin Borough police said. Lt. Robert Kernan said that no one was injured, but that more than 500 merchants and customers were evacuated from the 123 stores shortly after the 10:53 a.m. accident. He said the truck went out of control after its driver, Anthony Fanelli, 73, of the 100 block of Lester Avenue in West Berlin, went into diabetic shock.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed new safety rule requiring Pennsylvania utilities to move some residential gas meters from basements to exterior walls has triggered anxiety among preservationists, who fear a proliferation of unsightly devices on urban streets. Scores of commentators representing historical societies, neighborhood associations, and preservation commissions have submitted objections to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The Independent Regulatory Review Commission, the state's advisory panel on new regulations, on Aug. 15 found so many faults with the PUC's proposal that it suggested the agency withdraw the plan.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
By Thomas Hylton After decades of hard times, Philadelphia is rebounding. Millions of dollars have been invested in building rehabilitation, new construction, trees, and bike lanes. In the last decade, Center City and surrounding neighborhoods have gained 16,000 residents ages 25 to 34, most of them college-educated. With all this progress, it would be a travesty to allow a new form of urban blight to invade nearly every Philadelphia neighborhood: ugly meters and pipes placed in front of homes with gas service.
NEWS
June 22, 1988 | By Dan Stets, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia-based Consumers Education and Protective Association (CEPA) plans to launch a statewide campaign against the use of telephone lines to read gas meters. CEPA educational director Max Weiner said yesterday that the group would mount a petition drive to persuade members of the General Assembly to pass legislation prohibiting utilities from using phone lines for meter reading. The organization, Weiner said, is reacting to an earlier decision by the state Public Utility Commission to allow use of phone lines for meter reading.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In response to the car accident and natural-gas explosion last month that destroyed three townhouses and damaged two more, Peco Energy Co. says it will install steel bumpers over some gas meters in front yards. The placement of the meters came under fire after a car driven by Todd Herman, who suffered a seizure, veered off the road on Aug. 4, smashed a gas meter affixed to a garage and sparked the blast. Herman, 35, is a resident of the Gwynedd Pointe development, After the explosion, Fire Marshal Ray Sieger criticized the utility company, saying he had warned Peco of the possible hazard when the meters were installed.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Wednesday afternoon fire that destroyed three townhouses and damaged two others in the Gwynedd Pointe development after a car collided with a gas and electric meter has sparked an investigation by Peco Energy Co. and some worry. Yesterday, Peco officials said they would look into the cause of the blaze and try to determine whether similar incidents could be prevented. After a meeting between utility and township representatives, Peco spokesman Mike Wood said the investigation also would examine the original construction of the meters and what safety measures were promised to the township.
NEWS
May 8, 1986 | By Larry Fish, Inquirer Staff Writer
The gas-meter reader, a familiar figure in Philadelphia neighborhoods for generations, may be headed for the same fate as the Bond bread man or the Abbott's milkman. Philadelphia Gas Works hopes to begin to install microprocessors on the meters of its residential customers this year. The microprocessors will enable PGW's main computer to read the meters through the telephone lines. If all goes according to plan, virtually all Philadelphia residences will be equipped with the devices by the end of 10 years.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
To the Philadelphia Gas Works, it's just a question of using technology to provide better service. But to 300 angry consumers who jammed City Council chambers yesterday, that technology sounds like an Orwellian Big Brother scheme. The issue is PGW's plan to read gas meters automatically by connecting the meters to a customer's phone line, then reading the meter by calling the customer's phone number. City Council, in approving PGW's five-year capital budget last month, also quietly approved the first $5 million of an estimated $63 million it will cost the company to install the automatic meter-reading equipment.
NEWS
July 16, 2003 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public Service Electric & Gas has been accused in court papers of continuing to install residential gas lines near driveways, even though the company recognized years ago that doing so creates a potential hazard. "They have a standard dating back to 1986 that forbids it, and they have violated that standard," said Stephen DeNittis, one of the attorneys in a class-action suit that seeks a court order for PSE&G to move above-ground residential gas lines. The case stems from a February explosion that occurred after a Mount Laurel homeowner pulled into her icy driveway and slid into the gas supply line that was a few feet to the side of the garage door.
NEWS
July 3, 1987 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
To the Philadelphia Gas Works, it's just a question of using technology to provide better service. But to 300 angry consumers who jammed City Council chambers yesterday, that technology sounds more like an Orwellian Big Brother scheme. The issue is PGW's plan to read gas meters automatically by connecting the meters to a customer's phone line, then reading the meter by calling the customer's phone number. City Council, in approving PGW's five-year capital budget last month, also quietly approved the first $5 million of an estimated $63 million it will cost the company to install the automatic meter-reading equipment.
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BUSINESS
September 3, 2012 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed new safety rule requiring Pennsylvania utilities to move some residential gas meters from basements to exterior walls has triggered anxiety among preservationists, who fear a proliferation of unsightly devices on urban streets. Scores of commentators representing historical societies, neighborhood associations, and preservation commissions have submitted objections to the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission. The Independent Regulatory Review Commission, the state's advisory panel on new regulations, on Aug. 15 found so many faults with the PUC's proposal that it suggested the agency withdraw the plan.
NEWS
August 15, 2012
By Thomas Hylton After decades of hard times, Philadelphia is rebounding. Millions of dollars have been invested in building rehabilitation, new construction, trees, and bike lanes. In the last decade, Center City and surrounding neighborhoods have gained 16,000 residents ages 25 to 34, most of them college-educated. With all this progress, it would be a travesty to allow a new form of urban blight to invade nearly every Philadelphia neighborhood: ugly meters and pipes placed in front of homes with gas service.
BUSINESS
August 19, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A box fan whirled yesterday in a second-floor window of an Upper Darby rowhouse. But the electric meter attached to the rear of the house measured not a single watt - the meter had been crudely disabled. "That could be booby-trapped or something," said Johnnie Poole, the Peco Energy Co. technician who discovered the tampered meter, whose metal housing was twisted like a tin can opened with a knife, and scorched on the edges. The occupants declined to answer the door. So at 11 a.m., on one of the hottest days of the year, Poole ascended in a bucket crane and cut the overhead wires connecting the Woodcliffe Road house to the grid.
NEWS
November 6, 2004 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nearly two years after an explosion caused by a ruptured meter ripped through a Mount Laurel neighborhood, the state Division of Consumer Affairs has proposed regulations that would require gas utilities to provide safety enhancements to meters situated within three feet of a driveway. The regulations would govern meters on existing and new homes. They also would require gas companies to be held liable for personal or property damage caused by ruptures of unprotected meters. In addition, the gas companies would have to give the Bureau of Public Utilities (BPU)
NEWS
July 16, 2003 | By Joel Bewley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Public Service Electric & Gas has been accused in court papers of continuing to install residential gas lines near driveways, even though the company recognized years ago that doing so creates a potential hazard. "They have a standard dating back to 1986 that forbids it, and they have violated that standard," said Stephen DeNittis, one of the attorneys in a class-action suit that seeks a court order for PSE&G to move above-ground residential gas lines. The case stems from a February explosion that occurred after a Mount Laurel homeowner pulled into her icy driveway and slid into the gas supply line that was a few feet to the side of the garage door.
NEWS
March 18, 2003 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Here's what remains of three townhouses on Carleton Lane: a concrete slab, two storage sheds, and two trees adorned with a demolition company's signs. Last month, the three units were destroyed after a car slammed into a gas meter inches away from the driveway of one of them, causing an explosion and fire. The question now faced by residents, township officials, and Public Service Electric & Gas is how to prevent a recurrence in Mount Laurel. "We have to do something," said Bill Dukes, Mount Laurel's fire chief.
NEWS
November 10, 1999 | By Jason Wermers, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Authorities evacuated an apartment building here early yesterday after an apparently distraught woman fired at least three shots inside her apartment and inadvertently struck a gas meter. Ten people were evacuated from the six-unit, three-story structure at 826 W. Main St. after the incident at 2:37 a.m., said Charles Sweeney, borough fire marshal. Natosha Lynch, 24, was involuntarily committed to Montgomery County Emergency Services' Building 50 on the grounds of Norristown State Hospital.
NEWS
September 16, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
In response to the car accident and natural-gas explosion last month that destroyed three townhouses and damaged two more, Peco Energy Co. says it will install steel bumpers over some gas meters in front yards. The placement of the meters came under fire after a car driven by Todd Herman, who suffered a seizure, veered off the road on Aug. 4, smashed a gas meter affixed to a garage and sparked the blast. Herman, 35, is a resident of the Gwynedd Pointe development, After the explosion, Fire Marshal Ray Sieger criticized the utility company, saying he had warned Peco of the possible hazard when the meters were installed.
NEWS
August 6, 1999 | By Matt Archbold, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The Wednesday afternoon fire that destroyed three townhouses and damaged two others in the Gwynedd Pointe development after a car collided with a gas and electric meter has sparked an investigation by Peco Energy Co. and some worry. Yesterday, Peco officials said they would look into the cause of the blaze and try to determine whether similar incidents could be prevented. After a meeting between utility and township representatives, Peco spokesman Mike Wood said the investigation also would examine the original construction of the meters and what safety measures were promised to the township.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | By Patricia M. La Hay and Aileen Soper, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A natural-gas explosion and fire destroyed three townhouses yesterday in the Gwynedd Pointe subdivision after a man crashed his Saturn into a gas meter in front of a neighbor's home. Officials said the man suffered minor injuries. The driver, Todd Herman, 35, backed the car up and got out after he struck the meter at 104 Signal Hill Court. Herman, who lives in the 200 block of Signal Hill Court, was treated at North Penn Hospital for undisclosed injuries. No one answered phone calls to his home last night.
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