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NEWS
May 11, 1986
An April 16 Op-ed Page column, "Gas prices drop, so do gas stations," seriously misinterprets changes in gasoline marketing since 1972. Major oil companies are not trying to drive independent gasoline service stations out of business. Indeed, major refiners sell 81 percent of their motor gasoline through resellers such as independents, according to U.S. Department of Energy figures. Why would refiners want to drive their marketers and retailers out of business? The decline in the number of retail gasoline stations across the country has hit all retail operations, including company-operated outlets.
NEWS
December 7, 1990 | By Julia C. Martinez, Inquirer Staff Writer
So Saddam Hussein promised to free all his Western hostages in Iraq. And oil prices yesterday fell to their cheapest levels since mid-August. Demand for oil and gas keeps plummeting as the United States veers into a recession. And the nation has been left with a healthy supply of gasoline. Alas, consumers probably will have a long wait before gas prices fall as much as they soared. At best, consumers can expect penny-a-gallon declines in coming weeks instead of the nickel and dime increases that have hit motorists in recent months.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | By Ruth Tallmadge, Special to The Inquirer
In a short meeting, the Easttown Board of Supervisors Monday awarded a 1987 contract to Mack Oil Co. Inc. of Berwyn for gasoline products at what Melvin Boyd, board chairman, called "very attractive prices. " Mack Oil was the sole bidder. The approved prices were 56.4 cents per gallon for unleaded gasoline, 57.4 cents per gallon for leaded gas and 84 cents per gallon for diesel fuel. The prices do not include federal and state taxes, for which the township is reimbursed, according to township manager Gene Williams.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | By Frank Brown, Special to The Inquirer
Five parties ordered by the state Department of Environmental Protection to clean up an abandoned gas station on Lakehurst Road in Pemberton Township reached a tentative agreement Wednesday on who will bear the costs of the initial operation. Monitoring wells and a pumping system to remove gasoline and kerosene from the ground water will be installed at the site near Lakehurst and Junction Roads, said James R. Duerbig, a DEP environmental specialist working on this project. "The immediate work we want done is the removal of actual gasoline in the ground water, and then a remediation plan will be devised for the rest of the cleanup," said Duerbig, who estimated the cost of the first year of cleanup to be about $100,000, to be shared by the five parties.
NEWS
October 10, 1986 | By KURT HEINE, Daily News Staff Writer
The break in the Sun company gasoline pipeline that paralyzed the King of Prussia area earlier this week was located at 12:05 a.m. today, according to Sun spokesman Dennis Byrne. "The break, at its largest point, is approximately one-eighth of an inch, and covers the area on the bottom half of the pipeline. If you were to look at it as a clock, it would be from the eight o'clock position to the four o'clock position," Byrne said. The discovery of the break had been delayed by a cave-in, a backhoe breakdown and concerns over explosive gasoline vapors, officials said yesterday.
NEWS
May 3, 1987 | By Ralph Cipriano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Plymouth Fire Marshal Jack Fessler says he would like to stop residents from making the potentially deadly mistake of pouring gasoline into a kerosene heater. "The only way you can tell the difference between gasoline and kerosene is by odor," Fessler said. "Mr. Joe Suburban out there doesn't know the difference. " Bud Carlson, Cheltenham's assistant fire marshal, recalled that last winter, Cheltenham police had to use loudspeakers to warn residents that a local gasoline station had sold kerosene tainted with gasoline.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013
Brace yourself for gasoline pump sticker shock, Tom Kloza, the chief analyst for GasBuddy.com, said Wednesday. Kloza says wholesale gasoline markets "have turned violently higher" since the end of June and that retail prices will follow soon. Regional spot markets for gasoline are up by anywhere from 30 cents a gallon in New York to as much as 51 cents a gallon in the Chicago area since June 28. Kloza, whose Oil Price Information Service bought the more consumer-oriented GasBuddy.com in March, says the price surge is caused by a combination of panic short covering in the futures and options market, a surge in summer demand and worries about political instability spreading out of Egypt into North Africa.
NEWS
August 3, 1988 | By Mark Jaffe, Inquirer Staff Writer
While the Northeast has labored under the worst blanket of smog in more than a decade, states from Maine to Pennsylvania are moving to curb the key source of the pollution - gasoline fumes, environmental officials said yesterday. The states are each seeking to adopt regulations requiring refineries to make less-volatile gasoline for use at gas pumps during peak pollution periods, from May 1 to Sept. 15 each year. The change will remove an estimated 250,000 tons of hydrocarbon pollution each year from the air in the Northeast, according to environmental officials.
NEWS
August 17, 1991 | By Michael Weisskopf, Washington Post Inquirer wire services contributed to this article
In a rare accord between historic rivals, representatives of the oil industry and national environmental groups yesterday signed an agreement on a program to supply cleaner-burning gasoline to the smoggiest cities starting in 1995. The agreement spells out details required by the Clean Air Act of how oil refiners must reformulate gasoline so that the amount of smog-forming and toxic substances emitted through vehicle tailpipes is reduced by 15 percent. Motorists in the metropolitan areas where the gas must be used - Philadelphia is among them - can expect to pay up to 5 cents more per gallon by 1995, said William Rosenberg, the Environmental Protection Agency's assistant administrator for air. The terms of the agreement and the way it was forged by a range of nearly 30 traditionally warring interests give the deal an importance beyond gasoline.
NEWS
April 10, 1986 | By Laurie Merrill, Special to The Inquirer
An Ambler resident who mistakenly purchased gasoline for his kerosene heater escaped uninjured from his burning three-story home Friday evening after the gasoline ignited. Charles Sanders, 32, of the first block of North Street, told Ambler police that he purchased $4.78 of what he thought was kerosene at the 7-Eleven store at Butler and Bethlehem Pikes about 6:45 p.m. Friday. About a half hour later, Sanders poured the fluid into a kerosene heater that was operating in his second-floor bedroom.
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NEWS
August 5, 2016
By Michael A. MacDowell It's debatable whether it was Einstein, Ben Franklin, Mark Twain, or none of them who said that the definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different outcome. What isn't debatable is the validity of the statement. Individuals, institutions, and countries should learn from past mistakes, but they don't. Take Venezuela. When Hugo Chávez, the self-styled democratic socialist, was elected president of Venezuela in 1999, the country was wealthy, possessing immense proven oil reserves.
NEWS
May 26, 2016
Man falls onto tracks, is killed by SEPTA train A 55-year-old Texas man who had just visited the Liberty Bell was struck and killed by a Market-Frankford El train late Tuesday afternoon in Center City, authorities said. Just before 5 p.m., Woodrow Jackson, who was with his wife, apparently fell onto the tracks on the westbound side at the 13th Street station just as the train was arriving, police said. Jackson, of Cibolo, was pronounced dead at the scene. His wife was taken to a hospital to be treated for shock.
NEWS
May 18, 2016 | By Steve Bohnel, Staff Writer
ABOUT 3:15 SUNDAY morning, Alethia Smalls received a call from her son, Kevin. Moments later, she said, she would learn how he had lit his girlfriend, Melissa Bacon-Smith, on fire - a story that would dominate headlines and cause police to say the worst about her son. She wants people to know there's another side to the story. "Kevin Small is mentally ill," Smalls, 59, said Monday afternoon. "He's not a violent person, he just lost it . . . I don't like the Philadelphia police calling him a scumbag.
BUSINESS
March 16, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia, say goodbye to sub-$2 gasoline. Average retail gasoline prices in Philadelphia increased 11.0 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $2.01 per gallon on Sunday, according to a GasBuddy daily survey of 979 gas outlets in Philadelphia. The national average increased 11.9 cents per gallon in the last week to $1.93 per gallon. Prices in New Jersey, where taxes are lower, rose 11.7 cents last week to an averge of $1.68 on Sunday. "The cheapest gas prices of the year are now solidly behind us as the national average will soon again hit $2," Patrick DeHaan, senior petroleum analyst for GasBuddy, said in a statement.
NEWS
July 25, 2015 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
The national average price of diesel fuel fell below the price of regular gasoline on July 13 for the first time since 2009, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reported Thursday. EIA attributed gasoline's higher price to strong seasonal demand. Over the last six years, the average pump price of diesel was 34 cents more per gallon than regular-grade gasoline, according to EIA. Diesel commanded a higher price because of strong worldwide demand and the higher production cost of ultra-low sulfur diesel that was phased in between 2006 and 2010.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2015 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
While gasoline prices are plummeting, the fuel surcharge on Philadelphia taxi rides is falling less dramatically. In the rest of Pennsylvania, where cabs are regulated by the state Public Utility Commission, the taxi fuel surcharge was eliminated in 2013. Elsewhere, such fuel surcharges are being reexamined as well. The Nevada Taxicab Authority last month revoked a surcharge imposed in 2011. Even in Beijing, a 16-cent surcharge is being eliminated this week because of falling oil prices.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do higher gasoline taxes pay for? In Washington, the question has taken on increased urgency as Congress looks for ways to keep the federal Highway Trust Fund from running out of money in 80 days. And in Southeastern Pennsylvania, answers are already coming in, as transportation planners add $11 billion for highway, bridge, and transit projects that will be paid for largely by higher state gas taxes. Sens. Bob Corker (R., Tenn.) and Chris Murphy (D., Conn.) have proposed raising the federal gasoline tax by 12 cents a gallon over two years and linking it to inflation.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pennsylvania is seeking $2.4 million in civil penalties against Sunoco Logistics Partners for alleged Clean Streams Law violations related to a November 2008 spill of 12,000 gallons of gasoline near Pittsburgh. The spill in Murrysville, Westmoreland County, killed virtually all the aquatic life in a three-mile stretch of Turtle Creek, according to a complaint filed Friday by the Department of Environmental Protection with the Environmental Hearing Board. The DEP said a valve in the company's eight-inch pipeline ruptured shortly after a maintenance crew worked at the site, near a strip mall on Route 22. The rupture unleashed a 20- to 30-foot geyser of gasoline.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2013 | By Martin Crutsinger, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Higher gasoline costs pushed a measure of U.S. consumer prices up in June, but the overall trend in inflation stayed tame. The Labor Department said Tuesday that the consumer price index increased 0.5 percent in June from May. Two-thirds of the increase came from a 6.3 percent jump in gas prices, the largest since February. Excluding volatile food and energy costs, so-called core prices rose just 0.2 percent. Consumer prices have been stable this year, allowing the Federal Reserve room to continue efforts to stimulate the economy.
BUSINESS
July 12, 2013
Brace yourself for gasoline pump sticker shock, Tom Kloza, the chief analyst for GasBuddy.com, said Wednesday. Kloza says wholesale gasoline markets "have turned violently higher" since the end of June and that retail prices will follow soon. Regional spot markets for gasoline are up by anywhere from 30 cents a gallon in New York to as much as 51 cents a gallon in the Chicago area since June 28. Kloza, whose Oil Price Information Service bought the more consumer-oriented GasBuddy.com in March, says the price surge is caused by a combination of panic short covering in the futures and options market, a surge in summer demand and worries about political instability spreading out of Egypt into North Africa.
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