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Gasoline Tax

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BUSINESS
July 22, 2013
There is a famous saying that "no good deed goes unpunished. " That seems to be the case with fuel efficiency and transportation funding, and the consequence is that our infrastructure and economic competitiveness are being put at risk. Getting more miles to the gallon is great. We save money while the economy and the environment benefit as well. Unfortunately, filling up less means gasoline-tax revenue declines. Fewer dollars are available for road construction and maintenance, and that is a real economic threat.
NEWS
January 15, 2004 | By Martin E. Robins
The flurry of political recriminations following the collapse of plans to increase the state gasoline tax obscured the findings of Gov. McGreevey's blue-ribbon transportation commission. The commission reported in depth on New Jersey's long-term transportation needs and the reforms necessary to ensure the solvency of the Transportation Trust Fund. Those subjects deserve a place atop the public agenda and the attention of policymakers who are focused on New Jersey's future, rather than on finger-pointing.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | By Laurie Hollman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Barbara Hafer, the Republican candidate for governor, yesterday proposed a six-cent-per-gallon increase in the state's gasoline tax, in part to help SEPTA. Boldly pronouncing the T-word that other Republicans have shunned and that her Democratic opponent, Gov. Casey, has tried to keep at a safe distance, Hafer said a six-cent increase in the state's existing 12-cent tax "would meet the needs of the highway department, and it would meet some of the needs of SEPTA. " "It may seem like a lot of money," she acknowledged in Suburban Station at a news conference that was frequently interrupted by train announcements, "but I think it takes leadership to talk about some of the things that are needed in Pennsylvania.
NEWS
February 3, 1989 | By Katharine Seelye, Inquirer Staff Writer
Read their lips. The prospering businesses and booming communities of the Lehigh Valley are practically begging for a tax increase. As they compete for limited state money, local officials say they are willing to pay a higher gasoline tax to upgrade their highways. The Casey administration, however, remains firmly against an increase in the gasoline tax. Motorists already pay 17.4 cents per gallon in state taxes, plus 9 cents per gallon in federal taxes, for a total tax outlay at the pump of 26.4 cents per gallon.
NEWS
June 27, 1986 | By Alison Carper, Special to The Inquirer
A legislative budget-writing committee yesterday recommended increasing the state's gasoline tax by two cents a gallon to finance repairs to suburban streets and highways. The increase would take effect Oct. 1 and raise the gas tax to 13 cents per gallon. Legislators said it was expected to win approval in both houses of the legislature before lawmakers adjourn this year's session on Monday. Even with the increase, Delaware's gas tax would be lower than Pennsylvania's tax of 16 cents per gallon.
NEWS
March 14, 1987
If President Reagan would speak but four simple words, he could immediately ease four serious national worries - the budget deficit, the trade imbalance, the nation's increasing dependence on imported oil and the doubts about his ability to lead the government. The magical incantation? Raise the gasoline tax. Politically the timing is perfect. Mr. Reagan has refused to face budgetary realities for years, but now he is under growing pressure to do so through a compromise with congressional leaders at a "budget summit.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do higher gasoline taxes pay for? In Washington, the question has taken on increased urgency as Congress looks for ways to keep the federal Highway Trust Fund from running out of money in 80 days. And in Southeastern Pennsylvania, answers are already coming in, as transportation planners add $11 billion for highway, bridge, and transit projects that will be paid for largely by higher state gas taxes. Sens. Bob Corker (R., Tenn.) and Chris Murphy (D., Conn.) have proposed raising the federal gasoline tax by 12 cents a gallon over two years and linking it to inflation.
NEWS
February 13, 2008 | By Charles E. Greenawalt II
As lawmakers and others continue to focus on our state's transportation-funding challenges, they'd be wise to look beyond the gasoline tax as a long-term solution. Raising the gasoline tax fails to reflect a major shift in national energy policy, Americans' changing driving habits, and, finally, hard political realities in Harrisburg and in Washington. The fact that the gasoline tax no longer works as the principal means of funding transportation projects should be axiomatic by now: If it did work, we would not be in a crisis.
NEWS
October 9, 1987 | By Mark Fazlollah, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The state Transportation Commission voted yesterday to send its proposal for a 5-cent-a-gallon increase in the gasoline tax to Gov. Casey for review, maintaining that the raise was needed for a $11.7 billion road program. Casey spokesman Robert Grotevant said the governor opposed any tax increase. But Transportation Secretary Howard Yerusalim, chairman of the commission, told the members that one of the governor's aides was quoted as saying Casey would consider a recommendation by the commission.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | By David Hess, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Congressional negotiators are near agreement on key elements of a budget plan that would raise gasoline taxes by 4.3 cents a gallon but cut the federal deficit by less than $500 billion over the next five years. House and Senate Democratic leaders hope to seal the deal at a meeting this morning. If all goes well, President Clinton will announce it this afternoon, congressional sources said. The most controversial element of the agreement is likely to be its failure to meet Clinton's initial deficit-reduction target of $500 billion.
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NEWS
August 3, 2016
With his presidential and vice presidential ambitions dashed for at least another four years, one might expect Gov. Christie to stop paying homage to political expediency and make a statesmanlike decision about raising New Jersey's gasoline tax. But he still can't find the high road. Highway projects from Newark to Cape May ground to a halt more than three weeks ago, when Christie, rather than agree to a gas tax hike to replenish the depleted Transportation Trust Fund, decided to stop all spending.
NEWS
July 5, 2016
ISSUE | N.J. GASOLINE TAX Increase needed to repair roads Summer has arrived. In South Jersey, we are keenly aware of it because of the increased traffic on our highways and county and local roads, much of it heading to the Shore. Those of us in the business community aren't complaining, since those extra cars come with tourists who spend money. But those highways and county and local roads are in desperate need of maintenance, repair, and improvement. Lawmakers in Trenton are finally working on legislation that would increase the state's 14.5-cents-per-gallon gas tax by 23 cents, to 37.5 cents, and dedicate more than $2 billion a year to fund transportation construction ("Senate opposition puts brakes on N.J. gas-tax hike," Friday)
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A legislative proposal to more than double New Jersey's gasoline tax is sowing division in both parties and organized labor, as lawmakers scramble to solve a transportation-funding crisis before the fiscal year ends June 30. The proposal, which would also repeal the tax on certain estates of the deceased, drew quick response from likely candidates in the 2017 Democratic gubernatorial race, some of whom expressed concerns about income inequality....
NEWS
May 24, 2016
Think Pennsylvania taxes should be fairer, more sensible? Think every sector of the economy should be taxed equally? Think our CNI (corporate net income) tax rate, the nation's second highest, has anything to do with a job-growth ranking of 41st among the states? Well, a new book, Pennsylvania Illustrated: A Visual Guide to Taxes & the Economy , dips into the complex stew of state tax structure and suggests ours could use some stirring. The gist? Our evolution over 50 years from a goods-based economy to a service economy hasn't been matched by our tax system, which pretty much stayed the same.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2016 | By Andrew Maykuth, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvanians pay the highest motor-fuel taxes in the country, according to a ranking released Tuesday by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. State gasoline taxes and fees ranged from a low of 8.95 cents per gallon in Alaska to 51.4 cents per gallon in Pennsylvania, according to an EIA survey of gas taxes as of Jan. 1. That does not include an additional federal tax of 18.4 cents per gallon. Pennsylvania's state tax is 24.9 cents more per gallon than the national average, 26.5 cents.
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | By Andrew Seidman, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
ATLANTIC CITY - New Jersey motorists are all but certain to start paying more in taxes at the pump by the end of the fiscal year, next June 30. The only questions appear to be when lawmakers will vote to increase the gasoline tax and which other levies might be reduced to make the move more politically palatable. "We're in a crisis," Senate President Stephen Sweeney (D., Gloucester) said during a panel discussion alongside three other legislative leaders at the State League of Municipalities' annual convention here.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Now that millions of travelers have endured New Jersey's crumbling roads and shaky buses and trains to see loved ones over Thanksgiving, they might consider, perhaps profanely, how the state has failed to maintain these essential arteries by letting the Transportation Trust Fund run dry. Gov. Christie has been a poor steward of the fund. It was created in the 1980s by Gov. Thomas H. Kean to keep the state's roads, bridges, and transit systems in good shape. Christie, however, while refusing to raise taxes, raided funds from a scrapped Hudson River commuter tunnel to pay transportation costs.
NEWS
July 14, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
What do higher gasoline taxes pay for? In Washington, the question has taken on increased urgency as Congress looks for ways to keep the federal Highway Trust Fund from running out of money in 80 days. And in Southeastern Pennsylvania, answers are already coming in, as transportation planners add $11 billion for highway, bridge, and transit projects that will be paid for largely by higher state gas taxes. Sens. Bob Corker (R., Tenn.) and Chris Murphy (D., Conn.) have proposed raising the federal gasoline tax by 12 cents a gallon over two years and linking it to inflation.
NEWS
July 3, 2014
IN 1993, Bill Clinton was president, "Seinfeld" was on TV and a cellphone was the size of a brick. It was also the last time that Congress raised the federal gasoline tax, which pays for roads, bridges and public transit. Over two decades, the cost of building and maintaining the nation's transportation infrastructure has gone up significantly, while the tax designed to fund the work has stayed flat: Drivers still pay 18.4 cents per gallon at the pump for gasoline and 24.4 cents for diesel.
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