CollectionsGateway Project
IN THE NEWS

Gateway Project

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 14, 2000 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A crumbling East Camden neighborhood frequented by drug dealers and prostitutes will be the first residential area revitalized through the state's Gateway Project, which has already targeted the Admiral Wilson Boulevard. Emma Graham, 65, a resident of the Marlton area, in which the state will spend $6.3 million, watched yesterday as Gov. Whitman picked her way along a glass-strewn alley between two abandoned red-brick houses. "Where the governor is walking, people hide in there," Graham said.
NEWS
November 10, 1993 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Casino Reinvestment Development Authority gave unanimous approval yesterday for its representatives to begin negotiations with the developers of a $520 million project expected to return Atlantic City's "Queen of Resorts" to her former grandeur. The Maryland-based Rouse Co., known nationally for projects such as the Gallery Market East in Philadelphia and the Inner Harbor in Baltimore, will work with the Doubletree Hotels Corp. and Caesars Boardwalk Regency Corp. on the city's ambitious "Gateway Project.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013
Amtrak will get $185 million in federal funds to advance work on new Hudson River rail tunnels. The money, which will come from Hurricane Sandy relief funds, will be used to build an 800-foot concrete tunnel box under a huge real-estate development going up next to Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan. The box will serve two new flood-resistant "Gateway" tunnels designed to provide additional rail service between New Jersey and Penn Station in New York. The Gateway project, including the tunnels, is slated to cost $15 billion and be completed by 2025.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Amtrak continues to set ridership records, chief executive Joseph Boardman said Wednesday that new rail tunnels to New York are "critical" to meeting growing passenger demand. Amtrak is seeking $35 million this year to advance plans for its $13.5 billion Gateway proposal to increase rail service on the Northeast corridor by adding two tunnels under the Hudson, replacing the century-old Portal Bridge near Newark, and expanding Pennsylvania Station in New York. The Gateway project, which Amtrak hopes to complete by 2025, is a key part of Amtrak's effort to increase capacity on the overloaded Northeast corridor.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Christie administration, which killed a trans-Hudson rail tunnel because of fears of cost overruns, will pay its "fair share" of a proposed Amtrak tunnel project linking New Jersey and New York City, Christie's transportation chief said Friday. The payment would probably be a user fee to share the tunnels that Amtrak proposes as part of its $14.5 billion Gateway project, state transportation commissioner James Simpson said. Simpson, in Voorhees to address the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey, declined to predict how much of the cost New Jersey would be willing to shoulder.
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
Campbell Soup Co. took a step forward Thursday in a long-awaited plan to create a 13-acre office park around its Camden headquarters, appointing Brandywine Realty Trust as developer. The parcels of land, located off Newton Avenue between Admiral Wilson Boulevard and 11th Street, will become an office park for prospective users, who could benefit from amped-up tax incentives created through recent state legislation. When Campbell's committed to staying in Camden in 2007, it also announced plans to invest in the "Gateway District" by redeveloping the area around its headquarters.
NEWS
March 11, 1999 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
They will tear down the gaudy billboards peddling liquor and sex. Raze the burned-out buildings that house rats and trash. Replace the broken sidewalks and crooked utility poles with cherry trees and forsythias. Sixteen months from now, just in time for the 2000 Republican Convention and its many conventioneers staying in South Jersey hotels, the Admiral Wilson Boulevard, which carries 80,000 motorists into and out of New Jersey daily, is going to have a new look - one that Gov. Whitman said yesterday would do justice to one of South Jersey's major gateways.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Gov. Whitman is expected to pledge up to $40 million in state money today to revive the downtrodden length of the Admiral Wilson Boulevard, which ushers motorists in and out of New Jersey. State officials said yesterday that Whitman would take a bus tour of the boulevard at 11:20 a.m. and then announce the state's financial commitment to reclaiming the boulevard's lost character. Today, the Admiral Wilson Boulevard is known mainly for its cheap liquor and trash-strewn properties.
NEWS
March 29, 1990 | By Michelle Rizzo, Special to The Inquirer
How to turn 34 acres of unsightly, vandalized factories into a gorgeous residential area - that's a question the Bristol Borough Council wants its Planning Commission to answer. "I'm not looking to develop every square inch and get 4,000 families living there . . . but we're looking to the Planning Commission to give us some ideas," Councilman Joseph Saxton told commission members Monday night. The borough paid $2.5 million in 1987 to purchase three abandoned factory buildings, formerly the Dial, Purex and Zinc Works plants, as part of its Riverfront Project to beautify the neighborhoods bordering the Delaware River.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
October 11, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano and Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writers
Campbell Soup Co. took a step forward Thursday in a long-awaited plan to create a 13-acre office park around its Camden headquarters, appointing Brandywine Realty Trust as developer. The parcels of land, located off Newton Avenue between Admiral Wilson Boulevard and 11th Street, will become an office park for prospective users, who could benefit from amped-up tax incentives created through recent state legislation. When Campbell's committed to staying in Camden in 2007, it also announced plans to invest in the "Gateway District" by redeveloping the area around its headquarters.
BUSINESS
June 1, 2013
Amtrak will get $185 million in federal funds to advance work on new Hudson River rail tunnels. The money, which will come from Hurricane Sandy relief funds, will be used to build an 800-foot concrete tunnel box under a huge real-estate development going up next to Pennsylvania Station in Manhattan. The box will serve two new flood-resistant "Gateway" tunnels designed to provide additional rail service between New Jersey and Penn Station in New York. The Gateway project, including the tunnels, is slated to cost $15 billion and be completed by 2025.
NEWS
May 13, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Christie administration, which killed a trans-Hudson rail tunnel because of fears of cost overruns, will pay its "fair share" of a proposed Amtrak tunnel project linking New Jersey and New York City, Christie's transportation chief said Friday. The payment would probably be a user fee to share the tunnels that Amtrak proposes as part of its $14.5 billion Gateway project, state transportation commissioner James Simpson said. Simpson, in Voorhees to address the Chamber of Commerce of Southern New Jersey, declined to predict how much of the cost New Jersey would be willing to shoulder.
NEWS
April 12, 2012 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Amtrak continues to set ridership records, chief executive Joseph Boardman said Wednesday that new rail tunnels to New York are "critical" to meeting growing passenger demand. Amtrak is seeking $35 million this year to advance plans for its $13.5 billion Gateway proposal to increase rail service on the Northeast corridor by adding two tunnels under the Hudson, replacing the century-old Portal Bridge near Newark, and expanding Pennsylvania Station in New York. The Gateway project, which Amtrak hopes to complete by 2025, is a key part of Amtrak's effort to increase capacity on the overloaded Northeast corridor.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The construction tsunami that was meant to bring a classy luster to this place has slowed to a trickle thanks to the credit crisis. While a new $3.5 billion casino is starting to take shape next to Showboat on the Boardwalk, it is the only one of four huge projects moving forward. Both MGM Mirage and Pinnacle Entertainment Inc. have stated publicly that their $5 billion and $2 billion casinos, respectively, were indefinitely on hold because of the difficulty in obtaining credit in the midst of the economic slump.
NEWS
June 5, 2004 | By Matthew P. Blanchard INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Echoing urban-renewal fights of the 1960s, with a decidedly upscale suburban twist, a plan to revive shopping in downtown Ardmore is facing an intense protest campaign that this week brought 200 demonstrators to Lancaster Avenue, the heart of the Main Line. The Ardmore Transit Center Plan, supported by township officials and some business leaders, would spend $140 million to remake Ardmore into a vibrant urban shopping village befitting the wealth of the surrounding neighborhoods.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | By Dwight Ott INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The landmark Sears building, which has swirled in controversy in recent years, was sold last week for $2.5 million to the former owners of the South Jersey Expo Center in Pennsauken. The new owners, Joe Gonnelli of Mount Laurel and Brian Jackson of Voorhees, bought the building Friday from Aliza Realty of Delran, according to Kevin Burns of Markeim-Chalmers Inc., of Cherry Hill, the broker in the sale. Aliza had purchased the building from longtime owner Mark Willis for $1.2 million in October.
NEWS
July 6, 2003 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
For Leyda Vasquez, "opportunity was right around the corner. " Right in her North Camden neighborhood is the Gateway Community Project, which provides area residents with the opportunity to complete studies for a GED or to earn certificates in adult basic education or English as a Second Language. The program, developed by Camden County College and funded by several foundations and other entities, is offered at Looking Forward Ministry, a church around the corner from Vasquez's home.
NEWS
June 23, 2000 | By Dwight Ott, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Rutgers University's Camden campus continued its expansion efforts with City Council's approval yesterday of an agreement allowing the university to develop a $5 million park on the site of an abandoned factory. The outdoor recreational complex in the Cooper Grant neighborhood will be called Rutgers Community Park. The university has agreed to demolish the building at 5 Linden St., pay for the design of the park, and construct it. The park will include facilities for tennis, basketball, soccer, softball, and Little League baseball.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|