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NEWS
October 31, 1991 | Special to The Inquirer / CHERIE KEMPER-STARNER
Along with the usual ghosts, goblins and witches, a dog, a queen of hearts and dozens of strange characters of all ages, shapes and sizes gathered in Langhorne Sunday for the annual Halloween parade held by the neighborhoods of Maple Point, Highland Gate and Cider Knoll. Two hundred people turned out for this year's event, which included refreshments after the half-mile-long parade. There are no prizes awarded - it's all just for fun.
NEWS
June 19, 1990 | BY SAM PSORAS/ DAILY NEWS
With honor guard posted outside, hundreds of police officers began gathering this morning for the viewing of slain Police Officer Joaquin "Jack" Montijo at the Council of Spanish Speaking Organizations, on Franklin Street, near Fairmount Avenue. Montijo was shot last Wednesday as he tried to arrest a man brandishing a gun in the Hunting Park section. Montijo, who had been on the force less than two years, was off-duty when he was killed. Services were scheduled for 1 p.m.
NEWS
June 5, 1994 | Photographs for The Inquirer by Nancy Wegard
Drawing upon centuries of creativity and skills, American Indians from across the nation gathered in Westampton last weekend to take part in the fourth annual Spring Juried American Indian Arts Festival. Crafts, dances and other traditional arts were on display from May 28-30 at the Powhatan Renape Nation's festival, on the Rankokus Indian Reservation. More than 150 artists, performers and Wisdom Keepers - guardians of culture - attended.
NEWS
February 26, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by J. Kyle Keener
About 5,000 whistling swans descend at the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area, on the border of Lancaster and Lebanon Counties, about this time of year. They gather and build their energy before continuing a migration to the Arctic Circle's tundra. Their winters are spent on the Chesapeake Bay and other bodies of water from Delaware to North Carolina.
SPORTS
November 7, 1997 | By John McBride, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The last time South Jersey's best cross-country runners got together, the boys' and girls' course records were shattered at Kingsway in the South Jersey Open on Oct. 18. Those marks might be tough to match tomorrow for the South Jersey sectional championships, but it wouldn't be that shocking to see them fall again. Overbrook's Murad Campbell, who is unbeaten this season, won a division in 14 minutes, 58.60 seconds, becoming the first runner to break 15 minutes on the course.
NEWS
July 18, 1988 | By Michael D. Schaffer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Most of them have been in the United States for about two decades - long enough to begin worrying about whether their children will respect their religious heritage and the culture of their ancestors. "We will not always be there to support them," to remind them of the need to pray and to maintain their loyalty to the family, said M.C. Xavier. Xavier, a city Water Department chemist, was one of about 400 immigrants from India who gathered at St. Joseph's University during the weekend for a National Conference of Indian Catholics in North America.
NEWS
August 20, 2011
THE CORNER of Broad and South streets has long been a popular spot for Philadelphia's teen mobs, whose activity has led to a 9 p.m. weekend curfew for those under 18. But members of several community groups hope to turn the tables tonight at 8:30 in a demonstration against the curfew. Diop Olugbala, an independent mayoral candidate, says the curfew infringes on the rights of youth to assemble freely. It also fails to get to what he describes as the heart of the problem: economic conditions.
NEWS
August 6, 1986 | By Julia Cass, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents of the 4000 block of Glendale Street who gathered July 10 in front of a home just rented by a black woman were drawn there by a flier. Addressed to "Dear Neighbor," the typewritten leaflet asked residents of the block in the Juniata Park section "to come up to the driveway by 4055 at 7:30 tonight so we as neighbors can try to resolve what has been happening instead of other residents of Juniata coming around and saying things to us and riding up our street to see the so-called main attraction of Glendale Street.
NEWS
September 26, 2001
During the great stadium brouhaha in Philadelphia, a great deal of nonsense was written about the value of stadiums, both pro and con. One argument that those opposed to spending public money on the projects often derided and dismissed was this: stadiums' intrinsic value as civic gathering places, spots where an often atomized community could come together and cheer as one. Poppycock, the skeptics would sneer. It's all about dollars and cents, and the economic return that stadiums deliver is puny.
NEWS
May 19, 2003 | By Frank Kummer INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With an indiscreet sniff of a guest, the otherwise mannerly 5-year-old committed what might have been a breach of etiquette in any place other than this particular Holiday Inn yesterday. But the faux pas left few red faces. Canines outnumbered humans in this banquet hall. If all dogs go to heaven, then the Route 70 hotel was as close as you could get to it on Earth for the greyhounds, many of whom recently faced death. The fifth annual gathering of the "AOL Greyhound Gang" drew dogs and owners to Cherry Hill from as far away as Canada, and left other guests puzzled at the cacophony of 125 greyhounds "rooing" goodbye to one another in the back banquet room.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2015
Hardcover For the week ended May 10, compiled by Nielsen BookScan © 2015 the Nielsen Co. Fiction 1. Gathering Prey John Sandford. Putnam. $29 2. Memory Man David Baldacci. Grand Central. $28 3. The Girl on the Train Paula Hawkins. Riverhead. $27 4. The Liar Nora Roberts. Putnam. $28 5. The Bone Tree Greg Iles. Morrow. $28 6. Death Wears a Beauty Mask Mary Higgins Clark. Simon & Schuster.
NEWS
May 1, 2015 | BY MENSAH M. DEAN, Daily News Staff Writer deanm@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
WITH THE MISSION of stopping the violence that kills an estimated 13 African-American men and boys every 24 hours, Mayor Nutter yesterday welcomed about a dozen mayors and more than 300 other city leaders from around the nation to Philadelphia to work on solutions. Although the second annual Cities United Convening conference was planned long before this week's riots in Baltimore, that city's troubles were frequently invoked by the attendees at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown.
NEWS
April 27, 2015 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
Allison MacMath had no medical training. But on a cold morning in February, when a man beside her at the dog park suddenly collapsed to the snow, she remembered a simple tip: When giving CPR, skip mouth-to-mouth, and pump to the beat of an aptly named Bee Gees song. As she leaned against his chest, she said, she sang in her head, but out loud at the hook, "Stayin' alive. Stayin' alive," willing him to hear her. The man's wife comforted him with her own words. "Mostly, 'I love you, Frank, I love you,' " MacMath remembered Saturday, turning to Frank Norris, the man whose life she helped save.
NEWS
April 20, 2015 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1962, President John F. Kennedy committed the nation to landing a man on the moon by decade's end. In July 1969, it was mission accomplished. A half-century later, invoking Kennedy's challenge, scientists at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center announced they, too, were shooting for the moon. They launched the Cancer Moonshots Program, with the aim of reducing cancer deaths within five to 10 years. "It's a very goal-oriented effort that seems to impact one thing - and that is cancer mortality," Dr. Ronald DePinho, president of MD Anderson, said Saturday at the annual meeting convened by the Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)
NEWS
March 23, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THERE WAS nothing more Michael Sparks and Kelly Quain could do, so they grabbed their gear and hiked down a trail without their friend, the weight of what just happened too unreal to weigh them down yet. It was Sunday morning, and they were heading out from the Washington County, Md., shelter where Philadelphia folk singer Jason Parish, 36, had just been killed by a fallen tree, and the two men stumbled upon something strange, stuck in the mud....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2015 | By Ellen Gray
*  COMMUNITY . Tomorrow, Yahoo Screen. (Yahoo.com/community online or on Apple TV, Roku or Yahoo Screen apps for Apple and Android.) *  JAMAICA INN . Today, Acorn TV. MAYBE it's time to trade in the universal remote for a spreadsheet. Because the days of leaning back, pressing a button or two and having favorite TV shows come to you, live or off your DVR, are waning. Thanks to Netflix and Amazon and Yahoo and Acorn TV and Sony PlayStation and Crackle and an ever-growing list of streaming options that's about to include at least one stand-alone premium channel, we've entered the hunter-gatherer phase of TV viewing.
NEWS
March 16, 2015 | By Martha Woodall, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the American Montessori Society's convention Saturday in Philadelphia, Lisa Porter Kuh said she has a vivid memory of the day she arrived at Greene Towne Montessori School in Center City in 1966. The private school had just opened, and Kuh said she felt at home when she spotted maps, puzzles, and handheld learning tools like the ones at the Montessori school she had attended in Wilmington. The only surprise was the teacher. Kuh, now the director of early education for public schools in Somerville, Mass., said she had never seen a nun before.
SPORTS
March 5, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
On the day before its 1990 West Coast Conference tournament semifinal with host Loyola Marymount, Portland practiced in the Lions' Gersten Pavilion. "There are windows on one end of their gym," Miami Heat coach Erik Spoelstra, then Portland's sophomore point guard, recalled this week. "On the other side of the windows, there's a track. I'll never forget, that day we saw Hank [Gathers] out there running sprints with a parachute on his back. "To see the leading scorer and leading rebounder in the nation with that kind of work ethic, we were beaten before we even played.
SPORTS
February 27, 2015 | By Mike Jensen, Inquirer Columnist
Basketball players in Philly cried that night. A man with seemingly endless streams of energy, who had just dunked off an alley-oop for the last of his 2,723 career NCAA points, part of an iconic Loyola Marymount scoring machine, dropped to the court in Southern California on March 4, 1990. Even a quarter of a century later, there are no clear answers, even with genetic testing and significant treatment upgrades, about what the best way to protect Hank Gathers from sudden cardiac death would have been other than to get him to stop playing the sport he was born to play.
NEWS
February 23, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
After an hour of rocking the dance floor, Penny Warn takes a break. "I think people with disabilities have more fun than regular people," she says, as about 120 developmentally disabled men and women party like it's not a frigid Thursday evening in February. Inside Paris Caterers in Berlin Township, the heat is on. Fist-bumps, high-fives, and funky floor moves are the rule. And the hits keep on thumping, thanks to "DJ Dave" Michaels. "It's a fun night," says Robin Rowand, 32, of Pittsgrove.
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