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Gauguin

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NEWS
March 24, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The Philadelphia Museum of Art has received a bequest from the late Williamina de Schauensee, widow of Rodolphe Meyer de Schauensee, of three postimpressionist paintings - by Renoir, Gauguin and van Gogh - and three pieces of 18th-century French silver commissioned by Russian Empress Catherine the Great. Mrs. de Schauensee actually began transferring ownership of the paintings to the museum incrementally some years ago; under the terms of her will, the museum received the remaining percentages of the paintings in her control when she died Dec. 26. At that time, the museum had owned a five-eighths interest in the van Gogh, a one-quarter interest in the Renoir and a one-tenth interest in the Gauguin.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2001 | by Francesca Chapman Daily News Staff Writer
TASTYKAKE PAINTINGS by artist Jan Elmy, Rittenhouse Fine Art, 1723 Spruce St. Show opens with reception 5:30-8:30 tonight, and continues 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, through June 10. Info: 215-735-2676. Provence has its starry nights, so Van Gogh painted those. Tahiti has beautiful women in sarongs, so Gauguin painted them. And Philadelphia? Well, we have Tastykakes, so Jan Elmy is painting them. The Maryland-based artist is known mostly for her Chesapeake landscapes and snack-food-free still lifes.
NEWS
March 16, 1987 | By Nancy Goldner, Inquirer Dance Critic
On a night like yesterday, when the temperature beckoned more toward winter than spring, it was pleasant to look at a film of silky, blue water while dancers swayed to and fro. Another film of a man's feet making lazy circles in the sand was almost cruel at this time of year, so suggestive was it of the sun's warmth. Tonio Guerra's Darwin in Chains, a video-and-dance piece that was shown at Group Motion Studio over the weekend, is a kind of travelogue of places near and far - mostly far, and all exotic.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2002 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Our new flat-screen, 32-inch stereo television is a thrilling miracle ablaze in our now way-too-small living room. My wife and I feel like ancients viewing a full moon for the first time: "It will crush us!" we cry. And yet we cannot turn away. For years, we explored the cathode universe through Linda's worthy 19-inch workhorse, purchased in 1978. It didn't even have a remote control. When we moved to this area, we were forced to get a satellite hookup for it, because we live in a part of Deepest South Jersey where they apparently forgot to string cable.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"Life being what it is, one dreams of revenge. " This quotation from Gauguin stands as the epigraph to David Hare's superb play The Breath of Life, currently in a brief run by the Lantern Theater Company at St. Stephen's Theater. See it for the engrossing dialogue. See it for the subtle acting. See it for this small company's courage in choosing it. See it for "revenge" on all the crass, shallow stuff we're drowning in every day. This is drama made entirely of dialogue - it's all talk and no action, but what interesting talk!
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
A country scene by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot that is expected to sell for more than $150,000 will highlight next week's three-day gallery sale of fine furnishings and artworks at Freeman/Fine Arts. Timed to coincide with the Pennsylvania Antiques Show, the sale Thursday, Friday and next Saturday will offer more than 1,200 catalogued items, plus some additional items, such as a bizarre bronze that puns on the name of the artist Man Ray. The sale includes property from a variety of estates, including those of Blanche Levy and Mildred R. Montgomery, and property from the Philadelphia Club.
NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY ROGER MOORE, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
"RENOIR" aims to do for the great Auguste Renoir what "The Last Station" did for Leo Tolstoy. It's a lovely, painterly period piece that mimics the colors of Renoir's art, but one that never manages to find the warm, beating heart of the man. His paintings inspired passion in art galleries and museums, and in those who surrounded him and tended to his needs as he soldiered on, ravaged by old age, hell-bent on capturing more "beauty" at the expense of...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Toulouse-Lautrec to Picasso," the exhibition of 19th- and 20th-century prints at the Delaware Art Museum, should be called "From Daumier to Picasso," or even "From Daubigny to Picasso," because it begins early in the 19th century rather than in Lautrec's time. But then, there's only one Daumier print in the show, and relatively few museumgoers have heard of Charles-Francois Daubigny, an artist associated with the Barbizon landscape movement. Lautrec and Picasso are the titular anchors of this exhibition because they're responsible for about half its prints.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The major van Gogh exhibitions of the last six years might be described as "Vincent on the Installment Plan. " The sequence began in 1984 with "Van Gogh in Arles," where the artist painted sunflowers and postmaster Roulin, fought with Gauguin and mutilated his ear. Two years later, "Van Gogh in Saint-Remy and Auvers" followed him to a mental institution, where he painted wheat fields and irises - one of which sold for $53.9 million in...
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Landscape painters can either transcribe what they are looking at in strictly realist language or transpose the scene and its emotional impact into another mode of expression. In a series of landscapes made in Mexico over the last decade, Philadelphia artist Lee Lippman chose the second option. His colorful pictures describe actual locales, but they also convey his responses to those places and, in exemplary abstract expressionist technique, to the process of painting them.
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NEWS
April 19, 2013 | BY ROGER MOORE, McClatchy-Tribune News Service
"RENOIR" aims to do for the great Auguste Renoir what "The Last Station" did for Leo Tolstoy. It's a lovely, painterly period piece that mimics the colors of Renoir's art, but one that never manages to find the warm, beating heart of the man. His paintings inspired passion in art galleries and museums, and in those who surrounded him and tended to his needs as he soldiered on, ravaged by old age, hell-bent on capturing more "beauty" at the expense of...
NEWS
January 20, 2013
Previously best known for his entertaining YouTube skewerings of the art world, "Art Thoughtz With Hennessy Youngman," Jayson Musson, now having his first show with Fleisher/Ollman Gallery, has since become an official member of that sector. He's been cutting up Coogi sweaters (the colorful patterned cotton knitwear sported by Bill Cosby on The Cosby Show and more recently by various rappers) into strips of fabric that he assembles and stitches into patterns of his own. Pulled over stretchers, the finished tapestrylike works look as though they must be based on particular paintings, and their titles hint at such connections, but Musson's fabric manipulations are so subtle it's difficult to pinpoint specific forebears.
NEWS
February 16, 2010 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"Life being what it is, one dreams of revenge. " This quotation from Gauguin stands as the epigraph to David Hare's superb play The Breath of Life, currently in a brief run by the Lantern Theater Company at St. Stephen's Theater. See it for the engrossing dialogue. See it for the subtle acting. See it for this small company's courage in choosing it. See it for "revenge" on all the crass, shallow stuff we're drowning in every day. This is drama made entirely of dialogue - it's all talk and no action, but what interesting talk!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2002 | By Alfred Lubrano INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Our new flat-screen, 32-inch stereo television is a thrilling miracle ablaze in our now way-too-small living room. My wife and I feel like ancients viewing a full moon for the first time: "It will crush us!" we cry. And yet we cannot turn away. For years, we explored the cathode universe through Linda's worthy 19-inch workhorse, purchased in 1978. It didn't even have a remote control. When we moved to this area, we were forced to get a satellite hookup for it, because we live in a part of Deepest South Jersey where they apparently forgot to string cable.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2002 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
These are flush times for people who like prints. Six art history students at the University of Pennsylvania, directed by lecturer James Hargrove, have put together an exhibition of about 80 19th-century French prints that reveals a broad range of themes. "Leaving a Mark" at the Arthur Ross Gallery concentrates on the last half of the century. But the highlights aren't where one would expect to find them, among the impressionists and postimpressionists. The several landscapes by Camille Pissarro are wonderful, but the prints by C?zanne and Gauguin are less so. The real excitement begins with a large group of lithographs by Eug?ne Delacroix, including his 18-print Faust suite and a magnificent Lion Devouring a Horse.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 2001 | By Edward J. Sozanski INQUIRER ART CRITIC
Landscape painters can either transcribe what they are looking at in strictly realist language or transpose the scene and its emotional impact into another mode of expression. In a series of landscapes made in Mexico over the last decade, Philadelphia artist Lee Lippman chose the second option. His colorful pictures describe actual locales, but they also convey his responses to those places and, in exemplary abstract expressionist technique, to the process of painting them.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2001 | by Francesca Chapman Daily News Staff Writer
TASTYKAKE PAINTINGS by artist Jan Elmy, Rittenhouse Fine Art, 1723 Spruce St. Show opens with reception 5:30-8:30 tonight, and continues 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, through June 10. Info: 215-735-2676. Provence has its starry nights, so Van Gogh painted those. Tahiti has beautiful women in sarongs, so Gauguin painted them. And Philadelphia? Well, we have Tastykakes, so Jan Elmy is painting them. The Maryland-based artist is known mostly for her Chesapeake landscapes and snack-food-free still lifes.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1995 | By Edward J. Sozanski, INQUIRER ART CRITIC
"Toulouse-Lautrec to Picasso," the exhibition of 19th- and 20th-century prints at the Delaware Art Museum, should be called "From Daumier to Picasso," or even "From Daubigny to Picasso," because it begins early in the 19th century rather than in Lautrec's time. But then, there's only one Daumier print in the show, and relatively few museumgoers have heard of Charles-Francois Daubigny, an artist associated with the Barbizon landscape movement. Lautrec and Picasso are the titular anchors of this exhibition because they're responsible for about half its prints.
NEWS
April 6, 1991 | By David Iams, Inquirer Staff Writer
A country scene by Jean Baptiste Camille Corot that is expected to sell for more than $150,000 will highlight next week's three-day gallery sale of fine furnishings and artworks at Freeman/Fine Arts. Timed to coincide with the Pennsylvania Antiques Show, the sale Thursday, Friday and next Saturday will offer more than 1,200 catalogued items, plus some additional items, such as a bizarre bronze that puns on the name of the artist Man Ray. The sale includes property from a variety of estates, including those of Blanche Levy and Mildred R. Montgomery, and property from the Philadelphia Club.
NEWS
April 1, 1990 | By Edward J. Sozanski, Inquirer Art Critic
The major van Gogh exhibitions of the last six years might be described as "Vincent on the Installment Plan. " The sequence began in 1984 with "Van Gogh in Arles," where the artist painted sunflowers and postmaster Roulin, fought with Gauguin and mutilated his ear. Two years later, "Van Gogh in Saint-Remy and Auvers" followed him to a mental institution, where he painted wheat fields and irises - one of which sold for $53.9 million in...
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