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NEWS
May 22, 2000 | By Angela Couloumbis, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shelly Komito had been married for 23 years and had had two children before she openly acknowledged that she was gay. That was 1995, and one of the first things she did, she said yesterday, was to call Congregation Beth Ahavah in Old City - a Reform congregation serving gays, lesbians and bisexuals from Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware. "I told them my story," said Komito, 49, of that day five years ago. "And I asked if they could have some of their members call me. And they did. . . . And looking back on it now, I don't know what I would have done without their support.
NEWS
January 28, 2003 | DEBBIE WOODELL
I HAVE NEGLECTED gay culture for months. Most of the music tapes in my car are by straight performers. I gave up on Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway" in frustration and am reading a book with a straight woman as the main character, although she does have a lesbian mom. So I feel somewhat guilty that the Oscar Wilde Bookshop in New York, the nation's oldest gay bookstore, is about to shut its doors. Not personally responsible, of course, since I don't live in New York, but I can't remember the last time I spent money in Philadelphia's counterpart, Giovanni's Room.
NEWS
February 15, 2005 | DEBBIE WOODELL
THE RELIGIOUS right is going after TV cartoons, for crying out loud, and can't Lynne Cheney just say what she truly thinks? These two thoughts fill my mind these days as the gay community becomes a target in some new, interesting ways. First, James Dobson, the leader of the myopic Focus on the Family, criticizes a video promoting tolerance in schools that features, among others, Spongebob SquarePants and Winnie the Pooh. No, he didn't imply that either was gay; he merely said they must not be allowed to use their considerable influence to say gay is OK. Then, U.S. Education Secretary Margaret Spellings denounces PBS for spending good tax dollars on a program featuring another animated character - Buster the bunny - that depicts a lesbian couple during Buster's visit to Vermont to learn about maple syrup.
NEWS
September 16, 1997 | By Debbie Woodell
My friend Bill, rest his soul, was pretty traditional when it came to the British monarchy. He had a strong regard for the royal family and admired the pomp and circumstance surrounding the Windsors. But I suspect he admired Princess Diana not only because she brought charm and glamour to the monarchy, but because she worked to fight AIDS, which eventually counted him among its victims. It has not been lost on the gay community that Diana - in life and in death - was a great friend of ours.
NEWS
March 31, 1998 | By Debbie Woodell
You know, I was just thinking: When is the last time I got together with a million or so of my closest friends? It was in 1993, when people from across the gay spectrum gathered in Washington and turned the nation's capital into a gay capital. It was exhilarating, empowering and enriching to be together with so many people who were out - or came out - for one thing: seeking our full civil rights. With a major increase in gay visibility and key victories in workplace, family and other arenas since the march, it's been a whirlwind five years - we're not in Kansas anymore.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | By Oshrat Carmiel, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
They called him Mother. Members of New Hope's gay community revered feisty drag queen Joseph Cavellucci, 74, for nurturing gay pride since the day he arrived in town in 1949, looking for work as a female impersonator. Mother Joseph "Josie" Cavellucci, famous for strutting the streets with a pocketbook and stiletto heels, died Tuesday in a Bucks County nursing home after a long struggle with cancer. He leaves a legacy as a gay icon - a man whose sassy attitude defied sexual stereotypes long before any laws were enacted to protect against sexual discrimination.
NEWS
April 2, 2003 | By David O'Reilly INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Vatican this week issued a provocative new lexicon that explains official Roman Catholic teaching on sex, marriage, abortion, AIDS and related topics. But just a day after the release, gay groups were calling the 900-page glossary "vicious" and "irresponsible. " Among other things, the Lexicon on Ambiguous and Colloquial Terms about Family Life and Ethical Questions asserts that homosexuality is "without any social value," and that legislation permitting gay marriage is the product of "deeply disordered minds.
NEWS
July 6, 1998 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
It could have been the jilted lover who left threatening messages on the answering machine and shouted angry words in public. It could have been a trusted friend, someone he allowed into his apartment, someone he knew for months, or years. Or, the murderer who bound and strangled Keith Matthews may have been a one-night stand, a violent end to a night of drinking and revelry among friends. On Feb. 25, Matthews, 32, was found strangled and gagged in his Washington Avenue apartment near 7th Street.
NEWS
September 20, 2004 | By Dan Brooks
I'm an executive in the fashion world, where bags are either Hermes or Gucci. But when I was in college 36 years ago, bag was slang for the things that a person was "into. " It may have been music or modeling, bricklaying or baking, warrior or hippie, straight or gay. The latter was a really heavy bag to carry in those days. It still can be today, but I'm happy that in my enlightened community of New Hope, the word bag has far different connotations for gays and lesbians. This fall the borough is proudly presenting Somewhere Over the Rainbow: New Hope, Pa., Celebrates!
NEWS
April 26, 2012 | By Bob Warner, Inquirer Staff Writer
Brian Sims, a 33-year-old lawyer, appears to have defeated Center City's longtime representative in the state House, setting himself up to become the first openly-gay state lawmaker in Pennsylvania. Sims held a 233-vote lead over his fellow Democratic opponent Babette Josephs, with 51.6 percent of the vote, according to unofficial returns. Returns from seven voting divisions in the 182d District were still described as incomplete, but Philadelphia election officials said Wednesday that this was likely the result of blank cartridges from voting machines that were not used on primary day. The election results in the Sims-Josephs race are unlikely to change, they said.
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NEWS
September 14, 2016
ISSUE | INTOLERANCE Hardly Jesus-like I go to Mass every week with my wife and my daughters, even though I am not Catholic. I love the lessons from the Gospels. There is usually only logic and love. The politics of today, however, is another matter, far removed from the Gospels. I smirked when I read Camden Catholic High School principal Heather Crisci's comment that refusing admission to a transgender student was "about the school's Catholic identity" ("A leap of faith: 'Hi, I'm Mason,' " Sunday)
NEWS
June 23, 2016
By Jacquelyn Warr-Williams In the aftermath of the Orlando killings, there has been a tremendous outpouring of love and support for the victims and their families. But this tragedy has also brought to the surface the unbelievable hate that still exists for gay and transgender individuals. This hate is not anonymous, and it is not confined to one group of people. A California pastor openly commented that he was not going to mourn those who died in Orlando. He stated, "Are you sad that 50 sodomites were killed today?
NEWS
June 22, 2016 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Atlantic City, a city with a gay mayor and a storied gay community that has long knit itself into the traditions of its beloved seaside resort, officially mourned for Orlando on Monday evening. It was at the edge of the sea that the city's mourning took place, at Iowa Avenue near the Tropicana, in a ritual common among surfers and others with lives so tied to the ocean: a casting off of a wreath, brought out by Mayor Don Guardian and lifeguards Vince Granese and Mac Mancuso, who rowed the mayor out in a boat that first rocked over high waves.
NEWS
June 18, 2016
ISSUE | ORLANDO Hatred of gay people is all too real As a gay man now in my early 50s, I grew up in a time when gay people stayed deep in the closet, isolated and afraid; when images on film and television reflected a life filled with hopelessness and despair; when name-calling and physical threats and violence were as much a part of my everyday life as going to school (the two were often synonymous). In the decades since, thanks largely to President Obama and the strength and perseverance of the gay community, we have made significant gains in overturning discriminatory policies and achieving civil rights.
NEWS
June 17, 2016 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Janaki Chadha, STAFF WRITERS
In recent decades, the LGBT community has mobilized for the AIDS crisis, the repeal of "Don't Ask Don't Tell," and same-sex marriage. In the wake of the massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, some are now urging their gay and lesbian brethren to galvanize around the issue of gun violence. Others say they may support the cause, but must remain focused on equality battles still being waged. "Gun safety has not been a major issue for the LGBT community, but now it must be," wrote Eric Sasson, a columnist for the website The Daily Good . His article calls for action on both the national and grassroots levels targeting politicians, companies, investment funds and universities that support gun rights, as well as companies that manufacture weapons.
NEWS
June 14, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, STAFF WRITER
Leaders in Philadelphia's gay community were horrified and heartbroken Sunday by the pre-dawn shooting rampage at a gay nightclub in Orlando that killed 50 people and wounded 53 more, the worst mass shooting in American history. Through shock and anger, fears and resolve, they universally described the massacre as feeling personal and terrifying, like an attack on the entire LGBT community. "It's a reminder that as much progress as the gay community has made, there's still an incredible amount of pushback and hate in America," said Malcolm Lazin, founder of the Equality Forum, an LGBT civil rights group based in Philadelphia.
NEWS
June 12, 2016 | By Joseph Jaafari, STAFF WRITER
THEY'RE HERE, they're queer, and they're voting Trump. Donald Trump's legion of supporters in Philadelphia include a small band of openly gay voters who say the brash presidential candidate and the GOP represent their interests best. Indeed, the New York billionaire's LGBT backers are ready to throw shade on the media or anyone who says Republicans are a party of old, homophobic white guys. "Donald Trump isn't playing this game just to be pushed around by the liberal media," said Dr. Seth Kaufer, a delegate at this year's Republican National Convention and an openly gay GOP leader for Philadelphia's Second Ward.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2015
Stephen Betts noticed the mailers and commercials aimed at the gay community becoming more frequent, especially in the last year. "Definitely, I'm seeing more targeted advertising for gay and lesbian couples in bigger company ads," said the Center City resident, who works for a law firm. "It feels like they are going after different family types. " With good reason. In June, the U.S. Supreme Court recognized the legality of same-sex marriages. Gays and lesbians have evolved into a formidable financial bloc and are wielding their purchasing power with renewed gusto, experts say. Their spending clout is estimated at $884 billion.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Don't look for light cinematic fare for the opening Tuesday of the Philadelphia gay film festival qFLIX. Its second annual iteration, which runs through Sunday, will lead with a moody romantic drama, Beautiful Something , set here and shot by local director Joseph Graham. And the weighty stuff continues, with documentaries whose titles speak to global LGBT struggles, among them A Sinner in Mecca andthe savage, Ugandan-made Outed: The Painful Reality . One film being buzzed about in Philadelphia's gay community, however, has a comic streak as wide as the United States: Be Who You Are , a deceptively simple, charming, buoyant documentary to premiere at 7 p.m. Thursday at Prince Music Theater.
NEWS
September 24, 2014 | By Aubrey Whelan and Mike Newall, Inquirer Staff Writers
Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey said Monday that the department has concluded its investigation into a Center City assault that left a gay couple seriously injured - and that the District Attorney's Office is now reviewing the case. "We feel that there is sufficient evidence to have charges placed against some of the individuals there," Ramsey said in an interview. As prosecutors review differing accounts of the Sept. 11 incident, the case has spurred calls for changes to the state's hate-crime statute, which does not cover crimes motivated by sexual orientation.
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