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NEWS
May 20, 1991 | by Nels Nelson, Daily News Staff Writer
The "Ten Percent Revue" has been 100 percent satisfying for Tom Wilson Weinberg. It started in Boston in 1985, this collection of satirical songs about gay life, and ran for six weeks. "I thought that would be it," related composer- lyricist Weinberg the other day. He couldn't have been more wrong. The revue subsequently played San Francisco for eight weeks, Provincetown for three consecutive 10-week summer runs, Philadelphia for four weeks, Washington, Atlanta, Portland, Ore., and finally off-Broadway New York, where in 1988 it ran for 10 months in the Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1986 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ten Percent Revue takes its name from a lyric in one of the show's songs that says 10 percent of the U.S. population is gay. That may or may not be factual, but what is true is that you do not have to be homosexual to enjoy this lively and thoroughly entertaining show. Although every one of the 17 songs in Ten Percent Revue deals with male or female homosexuality and most reflect a pride in being gay, the show is not militant in its viewpoint, nor is it, except in a couple of instances, overtly sexual.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
In Richard Lester's consistently appalling farce The Ritz (1976) - in which a portly Cleveland garbage man played by Jack Weston hides out in a gay bathhouse and is pursued by a "chubby chaser" (a homosexual who runs to and after fat) - one of the characters boorishly declares, "If there's one thing I can't stand it's a queer without a sense of humor!" In Paul Mazursky's otherwise buoyant satire Down and Out in Beverly Hills (1986), there is a moment when filthy-rich Richard Dreyfuss bends to give mouth-to-mouth resuscitation to a bum (Nick Nolte)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1988 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
The drag queens vamping through Torch Song Trilogy are dressed to kill, but their gowns seem as out-of-date as a Nehru jacket or a white pillbox hat. Although there is still much to relish in Paul Bogart's caring and sensitive version of the stage play that proved that cross-dressing could attract a crossover, mainstream audience, the appalling facts of life in the late '80s have turned Harvey Fierstein's mordant serio-comedy of gay life in...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 1994 | Inquirer staff reviews and synopses, compiled by Christopher Cornell
A heart-rending drama and a challenging documentary top this week's list of new movies on video. MY LIFE (1993) (Columbia TriStar) 117 minutes. Michael Keaton, Nicole Kidman. Another of Bruce Joel Rubin's pop Zen meditations on life and death and how far you can go with that kind of stuff in conventional Hollywood moviemaking. Like the writer's Ghost and Jacob's Ladder, his new film - which also marks Rubin's assured directorial debut - examines big spiritual themes.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 9, 1997 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Unlike most movie sequels, Boys Life 2 represents a marked improvement in technical polish over the 1995 original. But in offering another anthology on gay life, the collection of four short films underlines the weaknesses as well as the strengths of the short. The best entry in Boys Life 2 is Mark Christopher's "Alkali, Iowa," which is based on a feature-length script he hopes to direct and plays as a work in progress with considerable promise. The feeblest is a bit of throwaway fluff called "Must Be the Music," a chronicle of a night of club life and young gays on the town in L.A. that ends where it should be beginning.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
The opening and closing song of Ten Percent Revue is called "Flaunting It," and flaunting pride in gay and lesbian life is the primary purpose of this generally upbeat and often humorous musical. The revue of songs by Tom Wilson Weinberg, being presented at Society Hill Playhouse, takes its title from the estimate that 10 percent of the population of the United States is homosexual. That potential audience is the show's target. That does not mean, however, that the musical should be ignored by others.
NEWS
September 5, 2003
Iread with interest the letters attacking me for daring to voice views somewhat critical of the gay marriage movement. The Purdoms wrote that I said "gay people are all rich. " Actually, I said gay couples have higher incomes on average than straight couples. Mr. Husava wrote that I don't "have a clue" about gays and my "homophobia shines through. " Yet his letter dodges the issues I raised. Both letters claim gay-studies give us a clear understanding of their world. I disagree.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | By Mubarak S. Dahir
On a warm November afternoon in 1995, Washington residents Marguerite Arnold and Romanus Wolter were sipping cappuccinos at a sidewalk cafe near Du Pont Circle, when Marguerite pointed out a handsome man walking toward them. "Oh, girl, puh-leeze!" cried Romanus in his best camp voice. "That one's gay. " "How do you know?" asked Marguerite. "Easy: Gaydar!" Romanus responded, referring to the built-in mechanism gay men swear they possess for identifying one another in a crowd.
NEWS
March 27, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeing Some Men in its Off-Broadway revamp, which opened last night at Second Stage in midtown, is like reading the dictionary definition of quantum leap. The look at American gay life by versatile playwright Terrence McNally - given a world premiere by the Philadelphia Theatre Company last spring - is everything in New York that it was not in Philly. Except fully frontal. In Philadelphia, the show bared all, and a lot of all. While the new version's not exactly modest, it's dressed up both intellectually and physically.
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NEWS
February 15, 2014 | By Maria Panaritis, Inquirer Staff Writer
PHILADELPHIA Amid news Monday of all-American defensive end Michael Sam's announcement that he was gay, Library Company of Philadelphia curator Connie King lifted the veil on an exhibition titled, coincidentally, "That's So Gay: Outing Early America. " King could not have known that a major gay rights story would be breaking just as she launched the eight-month exhibit of mostly 19th-century archives from the venerable library. The timing, however, underscored the timelessness of a cultural evolution and civil rights struggle that remains very much a work in progress.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2012 | Reviewed by Lewis Whittington
Eminent Outlaws The Gay Writers Who Changed America By Christopher Bram Twelve. 384 pp. $27.95   Christopher Bram's 1995 novel The Father of Frankenstein may have been fiction but was so accurate in its depiction of '30s gay film director James Whale that it could have passed for biography. Bram shows even more narrative power in his new nonfiction book Eminent Outlaws: The Gay Writers Who Changed America . Bram's portraits of an often-reluctant gay literary vanguard is fascinating enough, but alongside a 50-year narrative of unexplored gay aesthetic, he also provides a parallel history of the gay-rights movement.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Professional translator Steven Capsuto is also an expert about gays and lesbians on TV. "I have more than 2,000 video recordings," the Haddon Township resident says. "I have every queer episode of Medical Center except two. " That creaky Chad Everett melodrama of the 1970s had gay content? Who knew? Capsuto, 47, knows. He's the author of Alternate Channels , a soon-to-be updated examination of homosexuality's emergence from the broadcasting closet. It's a subject he regularly lectures about on college campuses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2011
STEVEN PETROW, the author of Complete Gay & Lesbian Manners: The Definitive Guide to LGBT Life , goes places that would have given Emily Post the vapors. He plunges into a diverse range of subjects including what I'll call the etiquette of fellatio. (Stop reading now if you're easily offended.) A polite gay man doesn't just do the "head shove," but instead tells his partner what he likes. And once things get busy below the belt, a mannerly man doesn't just - uh, you know - but instead warns his partner.
NEWS
July 1, 2009 | By Michael Hamill Remaley
I was born on the day of the Stonewall riots - June 27, 1969 - so my life is an individual history of the 40-year-old modern gay-rights movement. What makes my story particularly representative is just how conventional my life has become. I grew up on a farm in Pennsylvania. My parents were liberal college professors, but I was aware in high school - in the 1980s, when there was no treatment for AIDS and hatred for gays reached a fever pitch - that they wanted both of their boys to be heterosexual.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
A humorless drag diva dishing out advice to the lovelorn in black glitter and blond wig: If this is your idea of a good time, then Q, at the Walnut Theatre's Studio 5, is the show for you. Miss Tipsy (Gregg Pica) provides "tips," of the kind you'd get if Dan Savage and Dear Abby had a love child. The best number in Q is the last: The entire ensemble belts out "In My Body" with melodic passion. But mostly, Q (one of the "Six in the City" productions being presented by the Gay & Lesbian Theatre Festival)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2008 | By Robert Strauss FOR THE INQUIRER
Philadelphia is a long-time beacon in the civil rights movement for gays and lesbians. In fact, a plaque just across from Independence Hall commemorates the "annual reminders," the demonstrations at the hall in support of gay rights each July Fourth in the mid- to late 1960s, well before most cities even thought about such action. This week, Philadelphia hosts the 16th annual Equality Forum, believed to be the largest such event in the world, with as many as 75,000 people coming to the city for panels, seminars, arts events, and street festivals for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender issues.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 19, 2007 | HOWARD GENSLER Daily News wire services contributed to this report
WHEN LARRY BIRKHEAD threw his arms in the air after being named the father of Anna Nicole Smith's baby, who knew he was leading everyone in the chorus of "Y.M.C.A. " According to a "World Exclusive" in the National Enquirer, Birkhead leads a secret gay life. Model Kerrick Ross says he and Birkhead were lovers a half-dozen years ago. Maybe Anna Nicole's bio should be called "Scared Straight. " "America doesn't know the whole story about Larry Birkhead," Kerrick told the Enquirer.
NEWS
March 27, 2007 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Seeing Some Men in its Off-Broadway revamp, which opened last night at Second Stage in midtown, is like reading the dictionary definition of quantum leap. The look at American gay life by versatile playwright Terrence McNally - given a world premiere by the Philadelphia Theatre Company last spring - is everything in New York that it was not in Philly. Except fully frontal. In Philadelphia, the show bared all, and a lot of all. While the new version's not exactly modest, it's dressed up both intellectually and physically.
NEWS
January 19, 2006 | By Chuck Colbert
Sooner or later, more than a few of us men do a mountain stint. Scenes from the film Brokeback Mountain triggered bigger-than-life reminders of time I spent on that lonely hilltop. My Brokeback occurred 20 years ago in San Francisco. Serving as a naval officer, I was engaged to be married to a woman. But a severe case of cold feet pushed me to a critical turning point. Unlike Ennis Del Mar (played by Heath Ledger in the film) and Jack Twist (Jake Gyllenhaal), the movie's protagonists, I broke off that engagement six weeks short of my wedding day. Believe me, it was not easy telling my fianc?e a hurtful truth.
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