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Gaza Strip

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NEWS
March 25, 1991 | By Larry Eichel, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the darkness, an hour before the dawn, Mohammad Said Ali, 30 years old and the father of six, is standing by the side of the road, waiting for the bus that will take him to work at a construction site, across the border in Israel. For years, he has been making the grueling, daily journey to Israel from the occupied Gaza strip, waking at 3 in the morning, returning at 6 in the evening, taking home $15 a day or so after taxes and transportation. He has considered himself fortunate, compared to his neighbors in the Jabaliya refugee camp, where 80,000 people, most of them children, are crammed into an area of less than two square miles, without benefit of sewers.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
An American relief worker kidnapped by suspected Palestinian extremists in the Gaza Strip was freed today, about 30 hours after he was taken hostage, Arab reporters said. Christopher George, 37, director of the Save the Children Federation for the West Bank and Gaza Strip, was abducted from his office in broad daylight yesterday by Arabs demanding the release of prisoners arrested during the Palestinian uprising. "He was released unharmed. He's fine and he's gone off with American diplomats," a U.N. official said.
NEWS
December 30, 2012 | By Ashraf Sweilam, Associated Press
EL-ARISH, Egypt - Thousands of tons of building materials such as cement and steel began crossing into the Gaza Strip on Saturday, Egyptian and Palestinian officials said, temporarily easing a five-year-old blockade on the coastal territory. An Egyptian security official said the shipment was made in consultation with Israeli officials, who were in Cairo on Thursday to discuss security in the Sinai Peninsula and the Egyptian-brokered cease-fire agreed upon by Gaza's Hamas rulers and Israel last month.
NEWS
April 15, 1987 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Israeli army imposed a dawn-to-dusk curfew yesterday on a town in the occupied Gaza strip after police clashed with Palestinians at the funeral of a student killed by Israeli troops. In the occupied West Bank, anti-Israeli protests continued for a second day as demonstrators chanting "Israel No! PLO!" hurled rocks at Israeli troops in Ramallah, Bethlehem and Tulkarem. Army spokesmen said that in some areas protesters set up roadblocks and burned gasoline-soaked tires. No injuries or arrests were reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By William Booth, Washington Post
KHAN YOUNIS, Gaza Strip - Arab Idol is an over-the-top TV ratings smash in the Middle East, and a young crooner from a Palestinian refugee family, whom admirers have nicknamed "the Rocket," is stealing the show. The surprise breakout of the second season is a 23-year-old Gaza Strip resident named Mohammed Assaf, whose patriotic folk songs and romantic ballads - with their themes of grit, longing, and love - have propelled him into the final rounds. "I think this shows the world there are many normal people in Gaza, that Gaza is not just this place of terrorists and criminals but nice people," said Ala'a Nabrees, 22, a longtime friend.
NEWS
May 15, 1988 | From Inquirer Wire Services
The Israeli army ended a travel ban between the Gaza strip and Israel yesterday, allowing thousands of Arabs to cross into Israel from the occupied territory, on a day described by an army spokesman as one of the quietest of the five-month-old Palestinian uprising. But an Arab reporter, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said four Arab protesters were clubbed by Israeli soldiers and then dumped along Gaza's main highway yesterday. The reporter said the four, ranging in age from 16 to 22, said they were detained during protests in Gaza City, then beaten and thrown out of a truck several miles away.
NEWS
October 4, 1996 | By Alan Sipress, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The two soldiers, one Israeli, one Palestinian, share their meals, spreading the contents of their roadside lunches onto a makeshift wooden table converted from an industrial cable spool. As usual, Israeli Lt. Roy Beckerman snatches the flat Arabic bread brought by his counterpart, preferring it to his own sliced bread. Palestinian Officer Abu Tariq grabs the Western bread he has come to enjoy. Over the last two years, the men's sun-bleached tent has been a laboratory for a radical experiment in cooperation.
NEWS
December 30, 1999 | By Barbara Demick, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mustafa Elkhir remembers when he used to get up at 3 a.m., load his refrigerated van with a fresh catch of red mullet and grouper, and earn $1,000 selling the fish to Tel Aviv restaurants and hotels. These days, though, he can sleep late. Confined to Gaza by electric fences and armed Israeli and Palestinian troops, Elkhir, 40, a fishmonger, must content himself with a small stall buzzing with flies in impoverished Gaza's fish market. "There are days lately that I'm selling 50 shekels' [$12]
NEWS
September 20, 2005
AFTER reading the article "Palestinians tear into Gaza Strip," I can appreciate their happiness that they are getting their own land and state. I do, however, think it is horrible that they set synagogues on fire. This show of barbarianism in the final phase of Gaza withdrawal makes me have grave concerns for their future success. The Palestinian police did nothing to control their people or protect the buildings. I hope that these uncontrolled and terrorist-like actions were not a foreshadowing of the future because any aspirations of a healthy Palestinian state will also go up in smoke, like the synagogues.
NEWS
November 2, 2003 | By Michael Matza INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sitting alone amid a sea of resentful Palestinians, Netzarim, Israel's most isolated Gaza Strip settlement, is accessible only by joining an armored military convoy that rolls hourly over two lanes of broken blacktop that are swept each morning for roadside bombs. The dusty road west from Israel to the 625-acre settlement crosses parched, skillet-flat farm fields, then enters the Gaza Strip through a gated, electrified fence. It swings south past dilapidated Palestinian houses, then west again at barren Netzarim Junction, where an early battle of the intifadah produced the searing image of Palestinian boy shot dead as his father tried to shield him. It's near the spot where the first Israeli soldier killed in the uprising fell.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 28, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
On my refrigerator door I keep a photo of an exceptional Palestinian woman who ran kindergartens in Gaza in the 1990s for the Philly-based American Friends Service Committee. Mary Khaas, who died more than a decade ago, would drag her teachers from their refugee-camp homes to visit her Jewish friends at a kibbutz just across the Gaza border. She believed in two states, and wanted each side to stop demonizing the other. Attitudes have hardened in Gaza over the last decade, and I don't know how Mary would feel now. But as U.S. efforts to produce a lasting cease-fire falter, and temporary cease-fires run down, the photo reminds me that many Americans can't conceptualize the humanity of the civilians who are dying there.
NEWS
July 27, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Bursting with anger at the growing death toll in the Gaza Strip, 300 pro-Palestinian demonstrators hurled invective through bullhorns Friday outside the Center City office tower that houses the Israeli consulate in Philadelphia. "Israel, Israel, what do you say?" they chanted. "How many kids have you killed today?" For nearly three weeks, Hamas militants in Gaza have rained incessant rocket fire on Israel, and the Israel Defense Forces have bombed Gaza and invaded the coastal strip.
NEWS
July 26, 2014 | By Trudy Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
As the Gaza war drags on and the terrible civilian death toll keeps rising, it's necessary to look to the past to find a way to stop the killing. It's particularly vital to revisit the moment in 2005 when Israel made a strategic error by unilaterally withdrawing from the Gaza Strip. I wrote then that Israel should have negotiated its withdrawal with the moderate Palestinian Authority president, Mahmoud Abbas, and let him take the credit. The failure to do so undercut Abbas: Hamas claimed that violence, not negotiations, forced Israel to exit.
NEWS
July 25, 2014
ISRAEL Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu summed it up the other day when he said, "We use our rockets to protect our women and children; they [Hamas] use their women and children to protect their rockets. " Some time ago, the left adopted the Palestinians as their pet oppressed-minority group, so there is nothing that Israel might do that will be OK with them, except to commit suicide; that is, cease to exist - which is the stated policy of Hamas. Every time Israel refuses the suggestion that it cease to exist, the left becomes inflamed.
NEWS
July 25, 2014 | By Michael Matza, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing in the roiling thick of Wednesday's pro-Israel rally in Center City, Nancy Manno held a sign she thought said it all. Hand-drawn, it depicted a missile about to strike the Liberty Bell. "Most Americans don't put themselves in the shoes of most Israelis," said the Linwood, N.J., resident. "There's not one American who would tolerate the [Hamas] missiles that Israel has had to endure. " Another poster said it writ small: "More hummus, less Hamas. " Two weeks into the latest surge of Palestinian missile fire on Israel, and Israel's bombardment and military invasion of the Gaza Strip, more than 650 Palestinians and almost three dozen Israelis are dead.
SPORTS
July 20, 2014 | By Max Cohen, Inquirer Staff Writer
For Matt Cherry, pressure is not being forced to make a quick decision on the lacrosse field. It's having 10 seconds to get to a bomb shelter. Cherry, a Radnor High School graduate, starred in lacrosse at Dickinson College and graduated in 2013 as a two-time all-American and the school's all-time leader in assists. He never would have guessed where his path would take him next. He connected with Birthright, an educational organization that sponsors free 10-day trips to Israel for Jewish adults ages 18 to 26. He went with no plans to stay longer, but he has called Israel home ever since.
NEWS
April 20, 2014
A corner of Bucks forever Abbie Reading about Abbie Hoffman took me back 25 years to when I was working on the construction of the Point Pleasant pumping station ("A radical life," April 13). With the TV cameras gone, Hoffman and the protesters chaining themselves to the main gate was but a distant memory on the day word of his death came to the nearly completed project. I was doing a concrete patch in a dark corner of the basement, and in the wet cement I etched "RIP Abbie Hoffman" with the date and crossed out the "PUMP" logo.
NEWS
July 7, 2013 | By Ibrahim Barzak, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - The ouster of Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi has delivered a sharp jolt to Gaza's Hamas rulers, robbing them of their most important ally and raising difficult questions about the future of Islamic political movements in the region. On Friday, Hamas Prime Minister Ismail Haniyeh said he is "monitoring developments" in Gaza's larger neighbor, and is hopeful relations will endure despite the crisis. "We are not afraid of losing our cause, no fear that our cause will be absent from the Islamic nation's agenda, despite the difficulties and hard circumstances that sometimes the Islamic nation faces," Haniyeh said at Friday prayers.
NEWS
June 14, 2013 | By Karin Laub and Mohammed Daraghmeh, Associated Press
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - A refugee from Syria recently opened a bakery here, drawing long lines of customers eager to taste meat and cheese pastries with the special flavors of Damascus - a rare bright spot in the long shadow that the Syrian civil war is casting over the Gaza Strip. The conflict in Syria, about 190 miles away, is increasingly hurting Hamas-ruled Gaza financially, according to several officials in the Islamic militant group and in Islamic charities. They say Iran, an ally of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad and a former major financial backer of Hamas, has reduced monthly cash transfers because Hamas refuses to side with the Syrian regime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 2013 | By William Booth, Washington Post
KHAN YOUNIS, Gaza Strip - Arab Idol is an over-the-top TV ratings smash in the Middle East, and a young crooner from a Palestinian refugee family, whom admirers have nicknamed "the Rocket," is stealing the show. The surprise breakout of the second season is a 23-year-old Gaza Strip resident named Mohammed Assaf, whose patriotic folk songs and romantic ballads - with their themes of grit, longing, and love - have propelled him into the final rounds. "I think this shows the world there are many normal people in Gaza, that Gaza is not just this place of terrorists and criminals but nice people," said Ala'a Nabrees, 22, a longtime friend.
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