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Gazpacho

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FOOD
June 3, 2010
Summer can't begin until I've had my first bowl of cool gazpacho, and there's no better place to do the honors than Amada, where this warm-weather classic is transformed into a work of art. Yellow tomatoes are at the heart of chef MacGregor Mann's early-season rendition, rounded into a silky, bright puree with mellow Tuscan melons and edgy seasoning accents from Spain, from the extra-virgin olive oil (arbequina) to the sherry vinegar (sweet-tart Pedro-Ximenez) and even Catalonian bottled water.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Beth D'Addono and For the Daily News
FOR MY MONEY, gazpacho is the king of cold soups. Vichyssoise lovers may beg to differ, preferring their bowls filled with a refined blend of cream, potatoes and leeks. And that's good, don't get me wrong. But when it comes to in-your-face flavor and full-on summer seasonal refreshment, the tomato-based vegetable soup from the Andalusian region of Spain gets my vote. Chilled gazpacho, which is popular in Spain and Portugal, actually comes in three types: red, made with tomatoes and cucumbers, garlic, onion and vinegar; white, which borrows its color from ground almonds and is garnished with grapes; and green, an herb-infused concoction that is sometimes served with shredded lettuce.
NEWS
July 23, 1994 | By Susan FitzGerald, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The city Health Department has concluded there was clearly something in the gazpacho that sickened more than 500 women at a fund-raising dinner May 12 at the Bellevue. But laboratory tests have failed to pinpoint the exact organism that caused the food poisoning. City health workers had suspected that a virus called the Norwalk virus was responsible for a huge outbreak of vomiting and diarrhea among the women, but blood samples analyzed by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
FOOD
August 16, 1995 | By Andrew Schloss, FOR THE INQUIRER
Soup revives. It's not only cozy in winter but invigorating in the heat of summer. It is able to maintain its popularity year-round simply by changing temperature. Not all soups can be served cold. Vegetable and fruit soups work better than meat-based soups, which tend to get gelatinous as they chill. Jellied soups have their fans; however, they take a long time to cook, and then they need to be clarified and fortified. Cold vegetarian soups are far less labor-intensive, but in the swelter of August, work isn't the only obstacle.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
You say gazpacho, I say salmorejo . . . On the hunt for gazpacho, we spotted something called salmorejo on the lunch menu at Garces Trading Company. Listed as "chilled tomato soup, with egg yolk and Serrano ham," it sounded a lot like the original item. Turns out, it's a richer, smoother version with a velvety texture, and a soft-pink blush. Chef Gregg Ciprioni takes care to add the sherry vinegar just before serving, to avoid gazpacho's worst flaw - an overly-tangy pucker brought on by dousing it with vinegar too early, before the flavors marry.
FOOD
September 25, 1991 | Daily News Wire Services
Heart nutrition has seen many advances in the past decade, and the new, 5th edition of the "American Heart Association Cookbook" (Random House, $25) reflects the changes with updated recipes and 50 new ones. For example, there now are recipes incorporating arborio rice and brown rice. And the bean category has been expanded. Though tempting and often creative, recipes in the 1984 edition often called for large amounts of fat and nutrition information was limited to the number of calories.
FOOD
August 4, 2005 | By Beth D'Addono FOR THE INQUIRER
Summer and soup? Once the mercury rises, the very thought of sipping a bowl of hearty potage is enough to give a person the vapors. Unless, of course, the soup is refreshingly chilled. Cold soups showing up on area menus are moving beyond traditional fare like cucumber and vichyssoise, with innovative and exotic flavor pairings that tease and refresh the palate. Combinations like red wine and grapefruit, blueberry ginger and coconut plantain are just a few of the cool soups being served this summer.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Shore dining heads inland at the Virginia Hotel (25 Jackson St., Cape May, N.J., 800-732-4236) with special two-night culinary packages. The Farm To Table Epicurean starts at $502 (for two people, through Oct. 31) and includes a trip to Cape Resorts Group's Beach Plum Farm with Executive Chef Lucas Manteca to pick out produce for dinner. The Ebbitt Room Dinner package starts at $476 (through Dec. 30) and includes a $110 voucher for the hotel's Ebbitt Room restaurant, with its locally sourced menu.
NEWS
July 7, 2008
BLACKFISH AVALON 2109 Dune Dr., Avalon, 609-967-9100; www.blackfishrestaurant.com . Oysters topped with carbonated Meyer lemon foam and zaatar- dusted swordfish steaks over spicy merguez sausage are just two of the highlights at the new Avalon branch of the popular Conshohocken BYOB. It's already one of the Shore's finest kitchens. Dinner every day, 5:30 to 10:30 p.m. Entrees $28 to $39. BYOB. GERTRUDE'S 7309 Ventnor Ave., Ventnor, 609-823-3003; www.gertrudesventnor.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
June 27, 2013 | By Anna Herman, For The Inquirer
Juicy peaches, fragrant tart berries, soft and silky melon - with such wonderful summer offerings, why not abandon the Fourth of July burger tradition and give these seasonal stars a chance to really shine - in savory dishes. While a simple fruit crisp is a sound strategy for showcasing these bright flavors, summer fruit rises to another level when paired with savory ingredients. From classic prosciutto and melon to a modern take on tacos with pineapple salsa, fruit lends a delicate sweet contrast to salty or spicy, enhancing both, while adding color and pizzazz.
FOOD
August 9, 2012
You say gazpacho, I say salmorejo . . . On the hunt for gazpacho, we spotted something called salmorejo on the lunch menu at Garces Trading Company. Listed as "chilled tomato soup, with egg yolk and Serrano ham," it sounded a lot like the original item. Turns out, it's a richer, smoother version with a velvety texture, and a soft-pink blush. Chef Gregg Ciprioni takes care to add the sherry vinegar just before serving, to avoid gazpacho's worst flaw - an overly-tangy pucker brought on by dousing it with vinegar too early, before the flavors marry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Beth D'Addono and For the Daily News
FOR MY MONEY, gazpacho is the king of cold soups. Vichyssoise lovers may beg to differ, preferring their bowls filled with a refined blend of cream, potatoes and leeks. And that's good, don't get me wrong. But when it comes to in-your-face flavor and full-on summer seasonal refreshment, the tomato-based vegetable soup from the Andalusian region of Spain gets my vote. Chilled gazpacho, which is popular in Spain and Portugal, actually comes in three types: red, made with tomatoes and cucumbers, garlic, onion and vinegar; white, which borrows its color from ground almonds and is garnished with grapes; and green, an herb-infused concoction that is sometimes served with shredded lettuce.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 2012 | Beth D'Addono
Watermelon Gazpacho   7 plum tomatoes 2 cups watermelon, cubed 1/2 cucumber, peeled and seeded 1 clove garlic 1/2 red Fresno chili 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar 1 teaspoon sugar 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon chives, chopped 1/4 cup small cucumber, diced 1/4 cup small red onion, diced 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Salt, to taste   In a blender jar, combine tomatoes, watermelon,...
FOOD
August 11, 2011 | By Maureen Fitzgerald, Inquirer Food Editor
After the tables were properly set, the ice water was poured, and everyone was seated, the chef greeted guests and described the lunch prepared for them: Beef lasagna with homemade tomato sauce and grated Parmesan cheese; roasted red peppers with rosemary; green salad with creamy herb vinaigrette; and for dessert, lemon granita. The table captains, outfitted in white chef's jackets, were summoned to carry trays of food and serve it family style. Not exactly the setting or menu you might expect for an urban school cafeteria, but such was the scene at Girard College in North Philadelphia last week, where 260 city kids ages 6 to 17 were having lunch at a camp program.
FOOD
August 19, 2010 | By Ellise Pierce, McClatchy Newspapers
PARIS - There's a reason the cucumber is the star of its own cliche. Slender and elegant, bumpy or smooth-skinned, cucumbers really do have a cooling effect on the body, which is why they're perfect in summer salads, soups, and sides. Part of the gourd family, which includes watermelon, zucchini, pumpkin, and squash, cukes have a great nutritional profile: They're low-cal (just 13 per cup), and contain Vitamins C and A, as well as potassium, magnesium, folate, dietary fiber, and the mineral silica.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2010
Shore dining heads inland at the Virginia Hotel (25 Jackson St., Cape May, N.J., 800-732-4236) with special two-night culinary packages. The Farm To Table Epicurean starts at $502 (for two people, through Oct. 31) and includes a trip to Cape Resorts Group's Beach Plum Farm with Executive Chef Lucas Manteca to pick out produce for dinner. The Ebbitt Room Dinner package starts at $476 (through Dec. 30) and includes a $110 voucher for the hotel's Ebbitt Room restaurant, with its locally sourced menu.
FOOD
August 12, 2010 | By Linda Gassenheimer, McClatchy Newspapers
Fresh salmon, cucumbers, and tomatoes make a soothing soup supper. Gazpacho is a Spanish soup served at room temperature or chilled. Adding freshly cooked salmon creates a one-dish meal. The secret to the rich flavor of this dinner is that the salmon is cooked for just a few minutes. It may be a little red in the center when it is removed from the skillet, but it will continue to cook in its own heat. Salmon Gazpacho 1. Heat a nonstick skillet over medium-high heat.
FOOD
July 15, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
The rubber gasket was split in half on my Braun blender Sunday afternoon (as Spain was winning its first World Cup), and still I soldiered on - whizzing yet another batch of Louisa Shafia's watermelon gazpacho. I've made it four times now, in less than four weeks - serving it for dinner on our porch, gifting it to the in-laws in Cleveland, making it in a leaky Cuisinart in Oneonta, N.Y., showing my grandson, Sebastian, (now 11) that you can "cook" amazing soup without turning on the stove.
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