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NEWS
August 17, 1990 | Daily News Staff Report
GE Aerospace said today it will close its West Philadelphia Re-Entry Systems plant, which employs 980 people, and merge the operations with other facilities in suburban Valley Forge. The company blamed the decline in the defense industry for the action and noted that the plant at 32nd and Chestnut streets is underutilized. As part of the consolidation, 100 jobs will be eliminated through retirement, other attrition and layoffs. The company said some of the 100 employees will be hired at other GE businesses.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1990 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
The Navy has awarded a $64.9 million contract to General Electric Aerospace in Moorestown to build an Aegis weapon system that eventually will be sold to Japan. The system, expected to be completed by January 1994, will be the first of its kind to be sold overseas. Aegis, a defensive-weapon system, can track and fire on a number of land, sea or air targets, including planes and missiles, at distances up to several hundred miles from the ship it protects. It can also monitor attacks on those missiles, according to William Schumann, a spokesman for GE Aerospace in Washington.
NEWS
January 13, 1993 | By Bill Ordine and Karen McAllister, FOR THE INQUIRER
Hundreds of General Electric Co. employees last night plotted strategies to preserve pension rights and other benefits that they fear may be adversely affected if the proposed acquisition of the company's aerospace division by Martin Marietta Corp. goes through. Most of the 800 GE employees at the ad hoc meeting at the Valley Forge Hilton work at GE Aerospace facilities in King of Prussia. The employees approved by voice vote the creation of a five-member preliminary steering committee and gave the committee authority to select lawyers to represent employees.
NEWS
August 18, 1990 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Electric Aerospace said yesterday that it would close the West Philadelphia site it has occupied for more than three decades and relocate most of nearly 1,000 workers there to its King of Prussia headquarters by the end of next year. Although GE's Re-Entry Systems division, which makes nose cones for missiles, hummed with 7,000 workers at its late-1960s peak, the workforce has since declined to 980 workers, and the square-block site at 3198 Chestnut St. is "underutilized," GE said.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer Reuters also contributed to this article
A consortium led by General Electric Aerospace has won a contract to build South Korea's first satellites, spokesmen for Korea Telecom and GE said yesterday. The two satellites will be built at GE Aerospace's plant in East Windsor, N.J., where its satellite-building Astro Space division is based. It wasn't clear how much the contract for two communications and broadcasting satellites was worth to GE. Jim Tierney, a spokesman GE Aerospace, said, "It's not our practice to confirm bid prices.
BUSINESS
July 27, 1990 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
In what could spell more bad news for Camden, General Electric Aerospace says it may move some or all of its 2,500 employees out of its quarters on the banks of the Delaware. GE confirmed that pulling all of the division's employees out of Camden was among the options it was considering as it grappled with buildings it said are too large and inefficient to house the workforce it has cut steadily over the last several years. If GE leaves the city, one possibility is to move to unidentified GE facilities in the area, perhaps in Cherry Hill.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1989 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
"The time has come when we must see things as they are, not as we would like them to be. The good old days have truly ended. There are more unknowns than ever before. " That's the refrain John Rittenhouse, czar of GE's aerospace empire, echoes again and again to his 46,000 underlings. Indeed, the new year's tidings aren't so bright for the division, headquartered in King of Prussia, which sold about $5.3 billion worth of electronics equipment in 1987. Its principal customer is the U.S. government.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1989 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Electric Aerospace said yesterday that it was splitting its 11,000- employee Government Electronic Systems Division, based in Moorestown, into two units, with one to remain in Moorestown and the other to be based at the company's facility in Syracuse, N.Y. The Government Electronic Systems Division will stay in Moorestown and focus solely on radar and air-defense markets, and the Ocean Systems Division in Syracuse will handle only sonar...
BUSINESS
May 13, 1988 | By Andrea Knox, Inquirer Staff Writer The Associated Press and Reuters contributed to this article
The Pentagon yesterday named General Electric Aerospace in Valley Forge as the prime contractor to develop an engineering design for the first phase of the proposed "Star Wars" anti-missile defense system. GE beat out General Dynamics Corp. for the five-year contract, which will total $235.9 million and which includes options for two additional two-year contracts. "Cost was the major factor in picking GE," said a Defense Department official, who requested anonymity. Although some of the work will be done at a still-undesignated GE facility in the Valley Forge area, a number of other GE facilities and five major subcontractors will share in the work, according to GE spokesman Kenneth Leinweber.
NEWS
April 28, 1990 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
General Electric Aerospace yesterday said it planned to eliminate 1,870 jobs at its Camden and Moorestown plants by the end of 1992, plus 2,330 jobs at plants elsewhere. At the same time, the defense contractor said it planned to build two electronics-components production centers - one likely to be in Logan Township in Gloucester County and one definitely to be in Conklin, N.Y. Each of the new plants will employ up to 500 workers, mostly in production. While laid-off employees will be considered for jobs at the new electronics centers, GE Aerospace spokesman Jim Tierney said many of the jobs were not interchangeable with jobs in Camden and Morrestown.
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NEWS
February 15, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Richard E. DeFrancesco, 68, of Chester Springs, who grew from building a radio as a boy to supporting defense, space, and medical projects with his technological knowledge, died Sunday, Feb. 3, of a heart attack at Paoli Hospital. From the start, Mr. DeFrancesco, a Philadelphia native, was curious about how things worked, so he constructed a radio from Radio Shack parts. He was instantly hooked on such pursuits, and the foundation for his engineering career was laid, his family said.
NEWS
September 2, 2010 | By Sally A. Downey, Inquirer Staff Writer
George C. Haverly, 78, a GE aerospace engineer formerly of Gulph Mills, died of multiple myeloma Friday, Aug. 27, at the White Horse Village retirement community. During more than 40 years with General Electric, Mr. Haverly was involved in the development of ballistic missiles and defense satellite communications systems and he helped develop thermal-dynamics technology for the Galileo space probe. The NASA spacecraft began orbiting Jupiter in 1995 and for the next eight years captured images and science from Jupiter and its moons.
NEWS
July 14, 1995 | By Rich Henson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
His victories are few, and only on paper, but Robert M. Smith is not about to let a mere technicality stand in the way of eternal hope. That is all he has. A founding member of the Brandywine Peace Community, Smith, 44, had attended so many weekly peace vigils outside the former General Electric Re- entry Systems facility in Philadelphia that he was on a first-name basis with security guards. Then the plant, which made parts for the MX and Trident II nuclear missiles, closed in 1991.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1995 | By Michael Raphael, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT This article contains information from the Los Angeles Times
Come Monday, all 230 employees of Martin Marietta Services Group world headquarters in Cherry Hill will have a new, less expensive place to call home, the defense contractor announced yesterday. The new headquarters, which the company is leasing, is a few miles across town at 2339 Route 70, next to the former Hyatt Hotel. Company spokesman Neal Linkon said the company would save "hundreds of thousands of dollars" as a result of the move, but that there would be no layoffs.
NEWS
August 13, 1994 | By Joseph A. Slobodzian, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The U.S. Attorney's Office yesterday announced a $6.3 million settlement of a defense-contract dispute with Martin Marietta Corp. The agreement is the final piece of a complex $20 million deal worked out four years ago between the government and General Electric Co. Although GE signed the settlement in 1990, it has taken until now for teams of auditors to agree on a price for what the government contends were systemic overcharges in hundreds of...
BUSINESS
July 12, 1994 | By Dan Stets, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The workers at Martin Marietta Corp.'s regional electronics center never really wanted to be in pictures. They are skilled technicians who enjoy making electronic components for a range of military products - shipboard air defense systems, satellites and communications equipment. For the last three years, they have worked in a state-of-the-art manufacturing building where workers are known as associates, and associates work in teams with little meddling from supervisors. But they've become video stars in an effort to save their jobs and to salvage the future for their modern factory, known as REC South, which Martin Marietta is closing because of cuts in defense spending.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1994 | by Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer Daily News wire services contributed to this report
Martin Marietta Corp., which last year absorbed General Electric's aerospace division and its 17,500 employees in the Delaware Valley, said yesterday it has agreed to buy Grumman Aerospace Corp. for $1.9 billion. Norman R. Augustine, Martin Marietta's chairman, said in a statement the merger "will create a company with over $13 billion in sales that will have the critical mass, breadth of programs and depth of technology to be solidly positioned in the aerospace-electronics industry.
NEWS
December 25, 1993 | By James Cordrey, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In 1953, Upper Merion Township paid tribute to the father of modern rocketry by naming a street after him. In 1993, the town is paying tribute to the mother of all malls by renaming that street. Starting Jan. 8, Goddard Boulevard, the street that circles the King of Prussia Plaza and leads to the Court at King of Prussia, will be called Mall Boulevard, ending 40 years in which the road had names relating to the aerospace industry. Before it was named Goddard Boulevard, after scientist Robert Goddard, the road was Missile Boulevard.
NEWS
October 1, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Inquirer Staff Writer Ralph Vigoda and Correspondent Jane M. Reynolds contributed to this article
Six months after its merger with GE Aerospace, Martin Marietta Corp. dropped the other shoe yesterday: It will eliminate 11,000 jobs by the end of 1994, including more than 700 in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The cutbacks, like the merger itself, were described by the company as a strategy to make itself a stronger competitor for a shrinking pool of U.S. defense contracts. Although the cuts will eliminate 16 percent of the company's workforce, the job losses in the Philadelphia area will be relatively small, considering that Martin Marietta employs more than 15,000 people here, some employees said.
BUSINESS
April 23, 1993 | By Anthony Gnoffo Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Martin Marietta Corp. has announced a new corporate structure that largely retains the shape of the General Electric Co. divisions it bought early this month and leaves most of their top managers in place. But company executives now face a more daunting task - one critical to the more than 15,000 former GE aerospace and government service workers in the Philadelphia area. The company must assess its businesses and employees to determine which are competitive in the rapidly contracting aerospace business, and which are redundant or uncompetitive.
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