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NEWS
August 5, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
During a vigil to memorialize scores of Canada geese that animal-rights activists say were probably killed in Voorhees, David Sauder and Linda Richardson agreed and disagreed. Sauder, president of Animal Rights Activists of New Jersey Inc., worried that the geese had been slaughtered in what he deemed a cruel and unnecessary act. Richardson, while lamenting a possible violent end, was relieved the geese were gone, an absence that would drastically reduce residents' fight against the filth of goose poop.
NEWS
January 16, 2008 | By Peter Mucha INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Drivers passing Bishop Eustace on Route 70 in Pennsauken these days can glimpse the latest thing in scarecrow tech. Canine cutouts. A half-dozen black "dogs" have been scattered across the softball and baseball fields at the co-ed Catholic prep school in hopes of deterring Canada geese from dropping in. In more ways than one. "You don't want to be taking a groundball and have a big pile of goose droppings make the ball take a...
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | By Donna St. George, Inquirer Staff Writer
In the frozen cold of winter, when the Delaware is a river of jagged ice and melted snow, when bitter winds whip the waterfront and most other geese have long since flown South, these two - a sedentary couple - still make their home at the Moshulu. And with the help of friends like Willie Edney, they remain geese of ample girth - even now, after the grand old restaurant ship has been closed for six months and its daily kitchen handouts have dried up. "Usually I bring a loaf of wheat bread.
NEWS
April 9, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
When it comes to imitating nature, there's such a thing as too much success. Or so it would seem in the wake of a goose attack on the burgeoning Blue Route. There, in Marple Township, not too long ago, engineers cut down the trees in a nice woodsy spot, shaved off the top 20 feet of soil and dug, in the center, a nice, big, round basin. The idea was to create an artificial wetland: an instant, waterlogged paradise, indistinguishable from the real thing. The Blue Route is ruining about 25 acres of real wetlands, so PennDOT must create an acre of wetlands for every acre that is paved or filled.
NEWS
January 1, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / JOHN SLAVIN
Canada geese fly over Mason's Mill Park in Upper Moreland Township. Getting around isn't as easy for commuters due to the closing of the Mason's Mill Bridge.
NEWS
July 10, 1991 | By Louis R. Carlozo, Special to The Inquirer
One day about two weeks ago, Lucia Buttner of Franklin Township took a gander out her window at the geese in Iona Lake. But the geese were gone. They had dropped out of sight. Well, they didn't exactly drop out of sight - but droppings had a lot to do with their disappearance. Township officials said last night that the 44 Canada geese were carted off to the Pinelands on June 27 because their droppings were contaminating the lake. Now, the officials are in deep doo-doo with residents who live near the lake and want the geese back.
NEWS
March 13, 1988 | By Laura Liguori, Special to The Inquirer
Each year, thousands of geese swim among the reflections of pine trees in Gotwals Pond in Kimberton, Chester County. Named for "Doc" Gotwals, who purchased it for World War II veterans to swim in, the scenic pond is the wintertime home to Canada geese as well as ducks and other waterbirds. "Some days there are 500 to 600 geese. There seems to be a community," said Jeff Effgan, part-owner of the Kimberton Country House restaurant, which is a stone's throw from the pond. "Last week there were so many geese on the pond you couldn't see the water.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
At the Alverthorpe Park golf course in Abington, just beyond the second hole, geese glide idyllically on the lake. That they represent one of the great wildlife success sagas in natural history does nothing for Doug Wendell. "They're horrible," said Wendell, the township's park director. In Downingtown, where goose-patrol crocodiles have been prowling the waters for several years, Jack Law can relate. The geese have long since figured out that the crocodiles are fake.
NEWS
December 23, 1990 | By Bob Neubauer, Special to The Inquirer
Canada geese have long been a familiar sight in Bucks County skies as they migrate south in search of warmer weather, but as area winters grow increasingly mild, more and more geese are finding that Bucks County is not such a bad place to hang out. Casting their traditional migratory patterns to the winds, the geese are touching down on county lakes, and thriving on the local abundance of food. "They're opportunists," said Ron French, resident ornithologist at Peace Valley Nature Center.
NEWS
August 8, 1997 | By Scott Cech, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Montgomery County commissioners gave the unanimous go-ahead yesterday for a limited Canada geese hunt in Upper Perkiomen Valley Park next month to control the birds' skyrocketing numbers. "In order for us to control the population, we have to have a hunt," county parks director Ronald Ahlbrandt told the commissioners. Hunting will be allowed in the morning on a total of 12 days during Sept. 3 to 29. Ahlbrandt said the number of mated pairs of geese in the county jumped from about 30,000 in 1992 to about 88,000 in 1995.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Lisa Scottoline, Columnist
By the time you read this, I will be a year older. But no wiser. Because I almost got killed this morning doing a dumb thing. Or maybe the best thing I ever did. You be the judge. We began on a quiet Saturday morning, and I was going to meet my best friend, Franca, so we could ride our bikes on the trail. Yes, it's that time of year again, when Franca and I go bicycle-riding and try to remain upright. I was driving to meet her, and there was only light traffic because it was early in the morning on a summer weekend, but as I turned onto this main, four-lane road near my house, I happened to notice a flock of mother and baby geese about to step off the curb on the other side of the street and cross the road.
NEWS
August 1, 2015 | By Robert Moran, Inquirer Staff Writer
Debbie Reindl was on her way to buy pet food Wednesday at the Centerton Shopping Center in Mount Laurel when she noticed a bird flopping in a field next to the Costco store. Reindl, 57, of Mount Laurel, went to investigate and found several geese dead or wounded, and a man armed with a shotgun. Reindl recorded what followed. She posted the two-minute, 42-second video to Facebook, eliciting cries of outrage and accusations of animal cruelty. "That is horrible," Reindl is heard saying, her voice shaking, as she records the man with his right foot planted on the wounded, struggling bird's neck.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
THERE IS SIMPLY no stopping the "Fast & Furious" franchise. Numero Siete topped the box office for the third weekend in a row with $29.1 million, bringing the film's domestic take to $294 million and global take to over a billion. "The film has set a new standard for the potential for box office in the presummer month of April and has truly become part of movie folklore with its record-setting numbers, strong reviews, spectacular word-of-mouth and, of course, the outpouring of support for late star Paul Walker ," Rentrak senior media analyst Paul Dergarabedian said.
NEWS
March 24, 2015 | By Mari A. Schaefer, Inquirer Staff Writer
KLEINFELTERSVILLE, Pa. - Thousands of snow geese soar upward in unison, swoop about, and land on snowy farm fields or the little patch of open water just thawed from the thick ice of a relentless winter. Their cacophony of quacks and honks is punctuated by a burst of clicks from the long-lensed cameras of birders and nature lovers at the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area in Lebanon County, operated by the Pennsylvania Game Commission. "Here they come!" "Look, over there," exclaim 50 or so visitors at the observation point.
SPORTS
October 11, 2014 | For The Inquirer
She might be best known for once bursting through a gaggle of geese on her way to victory at The Meadows, but co-owner Howard Taylor hopes that by the end of the season people recognize Southwind Roulette for her talent. Southwind Roulette, who has won five of seven starts this year, races in the third of three Historic-Debutante Stakes divisions at Harrah's Philadelphia on Friday. Her victories include the Pennsylvania Sire Stakes championship and her $284,448 in purses rank No. 2 to undefeated JK She'salady among 2-year-old female pacers.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Tourism review With almost 40 million visitors to the region in 2013 supporting 90,000 jobs and generating $636 million in taxes, a thriving tourism industry should have an independent review as part of a financial checkup ("Visitor groups need revisiting," May 19). The Inquirer's editorial suggested our office conduct an independent review of Philadelphia's two major tourism groups, Visit Philadelphia and the Philadelphia Convention and Visitors Bureau. We recognize the importance of analyzing the impact that these two agencies have on our city to produce tourism dollars, and through our financial and policy unit, we will conduct a study of these revenues and ascertain whether a distinct return on investment can be produced between the two agencies.
NEWS
May 16, 2014 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
At the Meadows of Washington Township, Canada geese have made themselves quite at home, thank you. Picturesque pairs nurture their fuzzy-wuzzy goslings on the lush lawns of the condominium community, where a lovely little lake helps make for a bit of Gloucester County goose heaven. "We've created a habitat for them, and now we don't want them to live here," says retired teacher Barbara Spector, 64, who loves to watch the "beautiful" big birds splash down in the lake. "It's unethical to kill living creatures [just]
NEWS
February 25, 2014 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Farmers call them "flying rats" or "deer with wings. " They gather by the tens of thousands every year about this time to graze on sprouting winter wheat, rye, alfalfa, and barley. They're voracious, persistent, and dirty, leaving behind a trail of droppings. Canada geese. "You see a couple, then 10, 50, 100, 300," said farmer Ray Hlubik, 61, of Chesterfield, Burlington County. Soon, like a scene from Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds, "they cover a whole field. "They decimated my alfalfa last year," Hlubik said.
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