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Gelatin

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FOOD
July 31, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It's the food you've shunned that has the greatest potential to surprise. Take this summer when I made, on a whim, Dorie Greenspan's citrus berry terrine for a family gathering. Despite the fancy name, it was a straight-up gelatin mold, flavored simply with orange juice, though the jewellike flashes of segmented fruit in every slice made it look fancy and complicated. If I'd told my guests in advance what I would be serving, they might have scoffed, flashing back to pretzel and mandarin-orange studded rings of yesteryear, but their reaction to this fresh-tasting dessert was pure delight.
NEWS
July 21, 1997 | By Douglas Herbert, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Stomping and splattering their way through 67 gallons of Jell-O Friday, day campers at the Media-Providence Friends School turned a 100th birthday party for an American institution into a gelatinous jamboree Friday. The event, whose genesis was 220 boxes of powder and whose finale was a free-for-all romp in a wading pool of the gooey mess, gave a new dimension to the Quaker admonishment "to tremble before the word of the Lord. " Kylle Johnson, 8, was among those students who were fully into the occasion.
FOOD
May 12, 2011
Makes 4 servings 1 cup heavy cream 1 package Knox gelatin 1/3 cup pure maple syrup 1/2 ounce bourbon 1 cup whole milk 1. Combine half of the cream and the gelatin in a small saucepan and cook over low heat to dissolve the gelatin, about 5 minutes or less. 2. Heat remaining cream, bourbon and maple syrup in a separate pan until it begins to steam. Once the gelatin has dissolved and the maple-bourbon mixture has steamed, combine the two mixtures with the whole milk.
FOOD
September 7, 1988 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Yes, you can make your own jams and preserves, despite your diet, and despite high fruit prices too! These small-quantity "preserves" are simple to make, and you don't need sugar. You don't need pectin, or a pressure cooker either. In fact, you don't cook these at all. What we have here are the freshest, fruitiest spreads you can make, not like anything available in the store. Because these aren't sterilized by traditional preserving methods - and contain no sugar - they must be stored in the refrigerator and used promptly (within a week or two, or stored in the freezer until needed)
FOOD
May 14, 1986 | By BARBARA GIBBONS, Special to the Daily News
At less than 100 calories a serving, sugar-free milkshake mix is a great alternative to sugar-laden soda fountain treats. (Conventional milkshakes can cost you 500 calories or more!) Made from non-fat dry milk, these mixes are low in fat but calcium-rich. Homemade low-cal milkshakes are nutritious snacks. However, the mixes can also be the starting point for other easy treats, even fancy desserts. Here are some Slim Gourmet creations that start out with single-serving packets of sugar-free milkshake mix: ITALIAN RICOTTA PINEAPPLE CHEESECAKE 2 envelopes plain gelatin 1/2 cup boiling water 16-ounce can sugar-free crushed pineapple in juice 1 1/4 cups "light" (low-fat)
FOOD
February 15, 1989 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
Fresh pears, a welcome winter gift, are divine simply as snacks or light desserts. Better yet, Slim Gourmet cooks can use them creatively in grand- finale treats that only seem fattening. PEAR MOUSSE 2 eggs, separated 1 envelope plain gelatin 6-ounce can pear nectar 1 cup cubed unpared pears 3/4 cup part-skim ricotta cheese Optional: 5 packets low-calorie sweetener, or to taste Pinch of salt Separate eggs: Put whites in electric mixer bowl and yolks in blender or food processor.
NEWS
June 25, 1992 | Photos by GEORGE REYNOLDS/ DAILY NEWS
It sounds like one of David Letterman's stupid stunts. What happens when a perfectly sober person slides down a ramp and into 500 gallons of gelatin? It's strawberry, as if it really matters. The answer - besides creating a gooey mess - is the fight against leukemia gets a little easier. Thus, 20 otherwise sane people raised about $5,000 for the Leukemia Society of America, just so they could get gelatinized at Chi- Chi's at Franklin Mills last week. It was, as you can imagine, a rather sticky affair - an event that no doubt brought back bad memories for those who had been previously traumatized as youngsters by a daily dose of the quaking, shaking globs of the stuff they always served up at the school cafeteria.
FOOD
September 18, 1991 | by Polly Fisher, Special to the Daily News
Dear Polly: How can you press a pure silk suit? One wearing and it needs pressing. Yet water spots the fabric. - B.B. Press the suit under a pressing cloth. A cotton dish towel or a piece of old flannel makes a good one. This will protect the fabric and provide a smooth finish. You do need to work carefully to ensure that the suit is laying smoothly under the press cloth to avoid ironing wrinkles. You should be able to use a steam iron safely while using a pressing cloth, or you may use a dry iron and very lightly but evenly dampen the pressing cloth before placing it over the suit.
FOOD
August 15, 1990 | By Barbara Gibbons, Special to the Daily News
To save a plum from a wrinkled old age as a prune, you can preserve its fresh flavor almost forever in your freezer. Frozen plums will repay you in winter days by providing a taste of summer sunshine anytime you want. Few fruits are easier to freeze: put fresh, whole plums in plastic bags, label the bag and pop it into the freezer. Or you can pit the plums and turn them into a puree in your blender or food processor, and save the puree in small jars. The purees can be used in cooking or thawed and served as a topping for ice milk or frozen yogurt . . . in sauces and main courses as well as sweets and snacks.
FOOD
May 7, 2000 | By Aliza Green, FOR THE INQUIRER
The sparkling fruit jelly layered with jewel-like fruits in the window caught my eye at Milan's famous food emporium, Peck. I snapped a few shots to take home and inspire me to make my own version. Clear, colorful homemade fruit jellies were once the hallmark of a skillful cook. With the ease and availability of Jell-O today, most of us no longer know how to make our own. Valued for their shimmering appearance, jellies originally were based on a homemade gelatin-rich stock made from calves' feet.
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FOOD
July 31, 2015 | By Elisa Ludwig, For The Inquirer
It's the food you've shunned that has the greatest potential to surprise. Take this summer when I made, on a whim, Dorie Greenspan's citrus berry terrine for a family gathering. Despite the fancy name, it was a straight-up gelatin mold, flavored simply with orange juice, though the jewellike flashes of segmented fruit in every slice made it look fancy and complicated. If I'd told my guests in advance what I would be serving, they might have scoffed, flashing back to pretzel and mandarin-orange studded rings of yesteryear, but their reaction to this fresh-tasting dessert was pure delight.
NEWS
July 2, 2011 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
They're slimy, gelatinous sea creatures about the size of a dime, and they're washing up on Ocean City beaches. The clear, blob-like salps appear every few years, usually driven in by winds and ocean currents, state officials said. They don't sting or harm bathers. They're just annoying, especially when encountered in clusters. Salps "pop up when the conditions are right, then they're gone a short time later," said Larry Ragonese, a spokesman for the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.
FOOD
May 12, 2011
Makes 4 servings 1 cup heavy cream 1 package Knox gelatin 1/3 cup pure maple syrup 1/2 ounce bourbon 1 cup whole milk 1. Combine half of the cream and the gelatin in a small saucepan and cook over low heat to dissolve the gelatin, about 5 minutes or less. 2. Heat remaining cream, bourbon and maple syrup in a separate pan until it begins to steam. Once the gelatin has dissolved and the maple-bourbon mixture has steamed, combine the two mixtures with the whole milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2010
CHRISTIAN GATTI'S BAVARIAN CREME 1 ounce gelatin 2 tablespoons rum 2 tablespoons brandy 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier 1 quart heavy cream 1 quart whole milk 1 vanilla bean sliced in half lengthwise with seeds removed, or 2 teaspoons real vanilla extract Pinch salt 3/4 cup sugar 12 egg yolks 1 cup white chocolate, chopped (if using white chocolate chips, add 4 tablespoons vegetable oil)...
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2010 | By Rick Nichols, Inquirer Columnist
Our friends' stout, old country house is more in the mood of a cabin, really - burly rafters, massive stone hearth, a blaze of sunlight, last weekend at least, bouncing off the snow, flooding in through the low, eave-shaded windows. It is tucked into a hillside in lower Berks County, in farm country between Huff's Church and Hereford, and for years it is where we've retreated in deep winter for a lazy afternoon feast (followed by a reanimating postprandial walk down the rural lanes)
LIVING
October 28, 2009 | By Natalie Pompilio FOR THE INQUIRER
Zombies are big again this year. And if you visit "Terror Behind the Walls" - the annual scarefest at Eastern State Penitentiary - you'll see the brain-eaters lurching throughout the grounds: zombie prison guards, zombie prisoners, zombie patients in the infirmary. "You're so gross! I love it!" makeup artist Nickki DuBan gushed to a zombie wannabe whose lips dripped dark blood. (Actually, a mixture of food coloring and chocolate syrup.) DuBan paused, then added, "It takes a certain kind of person to work here.
FOOD
July 10, 2003 | By Nick Malgieri FOR THE INQUIRER
To deliciously celebrate Bastille Day - France's independence holiday on July 14 - here are two recipes, at left, from Dorie Greenspan's Paris Sweets. Sables Korova, or Korova Cookies, are Paris baker Pierre Herme's easy-to-make, easy-to-love chocolate chocolate-chip cookies. They are cocoa dark, not very sweet, chock-full of chocolate bits, melt-on-your-tongue buttery, just crumbly enough to be true sables (sand cookies), and just salty enough to catch you off guard. In fact, the combination of chocolate and salt makes these cookies fatally appealing.
NEWS
May 20, 2002 | By JUDY SHEPPS BATTLE
SAY THE WORD "Jell-O" and just about everyone knows what you mean. Celebrity endorsements of Jell-O - from Bill Cosby's pudding commercials to Alvin and the Chipmunks singing "Jell-O, Jell-O, time for fun" - have etched this product into our collective consciousness as an inexpensive comfort food. Unfortunately, "Jell-O shots" (mixed with half water and half alcohol) have also become a homemade staple at teen and young-adult parties because they are easy to make, colorful and hide the taste of alcohol.
FOOD
July 12, 2000 | By Annette Gooch, FOR THE INQUIRER
Early summer is the peak time in many regions of the country for cherries and a variety of berries - strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, boysenberries and such. These are the inspiration for glittering molded salads, cobblers, jams, and other fresh-fruit specialties. They are the sparkling jewels that adorn summer meals with their sweetness and vibrant color. Strawberries, raspberries and blackberries are best when used the same day they are purchased. Spread the berries onto trays lined with paper towels and discard any damaged or moldy fruit.
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