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NEWS
June 4, 1995
The premiere issue of Your Future - "not your father's personal-finance magazine" - poses an age-old question: Is it more expensive to be a woman or a man? Since this is a magazine aimed at folks a generation away from Social Security (and who doubt it'll still be around when they turn 65), the analysis is updated, focused on "typical" single people ages 25 to 34. On what they spend annually for clothes, hygiene, cars, food, entertainment, life insurance and, of course, vices. Some differences are surprising.
NEWS
April 6, 2010
I THANK the Daily News for documenting the protest against SEPTA's policy of putting "male" and "female" stickers on its weekly passes. Because the protest was of a modest size and transgendered riders are a minority, some people may not understand that this problem deserves a great deal of attention. SEPTA's current policy asks drivers to determine a rider's gender, and to expel or accept them on that basis. For any customer whose gender is not obvious - because of his posture, hair or style of dress - this odd requirement leads to confrontations that are humiliating and dangerous.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | C¬Ěsar Chelala
C?sar Chelala is an international public-health consultant A growing number of countries have adopted population and development policies to meet the health-care and education needs of women. Yet gender inequality persists in most countries around the world. According to the United Nations Population Fund state of world population report for 2005, gender inequality hinders not only the growth of affected individuals but also the evolution of societies and the development of countries.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BY REBECCA T. ALPERT
Until this fall, I believed that violence against women was experienced in the same way by all women. But the Clarence Thomas hearings, the acquittals of William Kennedy Smith and Mark McGraw and the conviction of Mike Tyson have taught me otherwise. As it turns out, the way violence against women is experienced has as much to do with race as with gender. As the Thomas hearings unfolded, I watched reactions around me. The white women I know had no problem making up their minds; we knew we believed Anita Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Different for Girls, a remarkable sex comedy about love in the age of transgenderism, the old boy-meets-girl plot line gets a twist and a snip. Here Boy No. 1 meets Boy No. 2, Boy No. 2 grows up and gets a sex change, and Boy No. 1 falls for her - although Boy No. 1 worries about his feelings. Do his desires for a post-op transsexual make him gay? Does that make any sense? And what will his mates make of it? With generous amounts of humor and humanity, Different for Girls addresses these and other knotty questions of gender and sexual identity.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
RE RONNIE Polaneczky's column on the Gates affair: I am appalled that you see it as "boys will be boys. " It doesn't matter if it was black or white, man or woman. The only thing Mr. Gates had to do when the police came was give them his ID plain and simple. But everybody wants to bring race in and now you claim a woman would handle it better. You also let the cat out of the bag why you show resentment toward police because of the incident with your husband years ago. I understand there are bad cops, but there are also great ones who go beyond the call of duty.
SPORTS
January 21, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The International Olympic Committee is recommending the establishment of special medical centers to deal with athletes who have ambiguous sexual characteristics. The IOC also wants rules put in place by sports bodies to determine their eligibility to compete on a "case by case" basis when gender is called into question. The IOC organized a 2-day conference with medical specialists in Miami to consider guidelines for handling sex-verification cases. The issue gained global attention last year when South African runner Caster Semenya was ordered to undergo gender tests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You'd have to admit that the Quintero family tree is knotty. Pablo Quintero, a celebrated Madrid filmmaker and hedonist, directs raunchy, homoerotic films and stage plays with enough decor to choke a horse. His sister Tina used to be his brother, but when he was a teenager Tina ran away to Morocco with Papa Quintero, who paid for Tina's sex-change operation before leaving her for another woman. Tina became a lesbian, but her girlfriend has just bolted, leaving Tina with her pubescent daughter Ada, who has a crush on "Uncle" Pablo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"I don't like conceptual shows," playwright Joe Calarco says of his high-concept, all-male adaptation Shakespeare's R&J. Mauckingbird Theatre's production of Calarco's script is the Philadelphia premiere of a play that had long, successful runs in New York and London (not to mention Japan and Australia). Currently in previews, it opens Wednesday at the Adrienne. Mauckingbird, which is dedicated to re-viewing classic drama through a gay lens, debuted in January with an all-male production of The Misanthrope, a surprisingly persuasive, as well as entertaining, take on the classic Moliere comedy.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Boy or girl? A simple blood test for mothers-to-be can answer that question with surprising accuracy at about seven weeks, a research analysis published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association has found. Though not widely offered by U.S. doctors, gender-detecting blood tests have been sold online to consumers for the past few years. Their promises of early and accurate results prompted genetics researchers to take a closer look. They analyzed 57 published studies of gender-testing done in rigorous research or academic settings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Blanchett: Hear me roar "We have to push forward," Cate Blanchett tells Variety regarding the responsibility of women in the film industry to achieve parity - in pay and in opportunity, for not only actors but also writers and directors. "What industry has parity pay for women? None. Why would we expect this industry to be any different?" Blanchett, 45, plays Rooney Mara 's lover in Carol , director Todd Haynes ' adaptation of Patricia Highsmith 's scandalous 1952 novel The Price of Salt . It's one of a growing number of films, she says, that tell women's stories.
NEWS
April 24, 2015
DIRECTOR ALEX Garland is downplaying the sex appeal of the robot-woman star of "Ex Machina," but the design speaks for itself. You see "her" in the posters - half bikini model, half bionic machine, like something that Sir Jonathan Paul Ive might have designed for Apple had the company been founded by Bob Guccione instead of Steve Jobs. And the design is crucial to the story - that of a young software geek (Domnhall Gleeson) assigned to evaluate this robo-gal for the existence of a native, human intelligence.
NEWS
March 2, 2015 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Reuters editor Lauren Young and Farnoosh Torabi, author of three books, including When She Makes More, had a key message Saturday for young women in high school: Money makes the world go around - and their first big money decision will be college. Young, a financial journalist, and Torabi, a personal-finance expert, were back on their home turf at Harriton High School for the second annual Girls Leadership Conference, started last year by the Lower Merion School District's Innovation Center.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 2015
TO PARAPHRASE the line from the Watergate hearings (for you younger readers, Watergate was kind of like Deflategate, but in politics, not football), what did Kris Jenner know about her ex-husband's gender issues and when did she know it? The former Mrs. Bruce Jenner has insisted that she was "in the dark" about her ex's desire to live as a woman. Others say otherwise. Several gossip websites reported Monday that Kris was hip to Bruce's longings early on. RadarOnline reported that within months of trading "I dos" in the early 1990s, Kris discovered Bruce dressing in her threads.
NEWS
December 8, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 2011, Heather Thomason was living in Brooklyn, N.Y., working in graphic design and spending her off-hours at farmers' markets and food co-ops to fuel her cooking habit. "People asked me did I wish that I worked in food, because I was always talking about food and always cooking," she says. Now - three years and one radical career change later - she's a butcher and manager at Kensington Quarters, the new restaurant, bar, and butcher shop in Fishtown that specializes in carving up whole animals sustainably raised on local farms.
NEWS
November 28, 2014 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
It's a neat trick. Fulfill retrograde girlish fantasies (tall, handsome, rich prince whisks you away from your dreary chores and your lousy dresses), while also pandering to the demands of contemporary gender politics: offer empowerment, self-actualization, and any other politically correct goal on the current curriculum. And this touring production of the Broadway show Cinderella , at the Academy of Music for the Thanksgiving holiday week, adds to the PC effect with a veritable rainbow of actors in the ensemble.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Laura Weiss, Inquirer Staff Writer
Women, racial minorities, and people over 75 are underrepresented in the clinical trials that help determine the way all cardiac patients are treated, a study from Lankenau Medical Center researchers has found. This means that the recommendations that doctors use to treat heart problems may not be the best for all groups, said senior author Peter Kowey, head of Cardiology for Main Line Health. A team at Lankenau Heart Institute and Lankenau Institute for Medical Research laid out the disparities in a research letter published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association.
NEWS
November 3, 2014 | By Samantha Melamed, Inquirer Staff Writer
For the generation who grew up on Free to Be ... You and Me , the memories remain vivid. In Toronto, Chana Rothman alternated Free to Be with her parents' Simon & Garfunkel and Carole King. "It felt like it was the voice of a movement, and it felt like the movement could include me. " In Philadelphia, Robin Packel got the album just as she was entering adolescence. "That and my mom's Ms. Magazine - that message of 'Be who you are, and don't be concerned about gender roles' - that was all part of developing my thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2014 | By David Patrick Stearns, Inquirer Staff Writer
'Today is skate day, kiddos!" Wouldn't that be every day for the horizontally mobile? Not for "Shred the Patriarchy," an informal, feminist-slanted group that has been sending that message over Facebook much of the summer to meet at Paine's Park on Thursdays and Sundays. This loose collection of women of all stripes - its fliers call for any "female-identified folks" - are hardly typical or hugely welcome among the guys performing sprint-speed feats on boards and bikes. Shred the Patriarchy, organized on Facebook by 21-year-old philosophy student Sky Kalfus, is there to establish a presence for women in skateboard parks - as well as an opportunity for them to get better.
NEWS
August 1, 2014 | By Gideon Bradshaw, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - The head of the Pennsylvania State Police said Wednesday that he planned to fight a federal lawsuit seeking to dial down the agency's hiring standards. The Department of Justice contended in a complaint filed Tuesday that the state police physical-testing standards lead to a gender-based disparity in hiring. Commissioner Frank Noonan said Wednesday he planned to challenge it "all the way. "We should not be bullied into lowering our standards for any applicants," Noonan said.
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