CollectionsGender
IN THE NEWS

Gender

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
June 4, 1995
The premiere issue of Your Future - "not your father's personal-finance magazine" - poses an age-old question: Is it more expensive to be a woman or a man? Since this is a magazine aimed at folks a generation away from Social Security (and who doubt it'll still be around when they turn 65), the analysis is updated, focused on "typical" single people ages 25 to 34. On what they spend annually for clothes, hygiene, cars, food, entertainment, life insurance and, of course, vices. Some differences are surprising.
NEWS
April 6, 2010
I THANK the Daily News for documenting the protest against SEPTA's policy of putting "male" and "female" stickers on its weekly passes. Because the protest was of a modest size and transgendered riders are a minority, some people may not understand that this problem deserves a great deal of attention. SEPTA's current policy asks drivers to determine a rider's gender, and to expel or accept them on that basis. For any customer whose gender is not obvious - because of his posture, hair or style of dress - this odd requirement leads to confrontations that are humiliating and dangerous.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | Csar Chelala
C?sar Chelala is an international public-health consultant A growing number of countries have adopted population and development policies to meet the health-care and education needs of women. Yet gender inequality persists in most countries around the world. According to the United Nations Population Fund state of world population report for 2005, gender inequality hinders not only the growth of affected individuals but also the evolution of societies and the development of countries.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BY REBECCA T. ALPERT
Until this fall, I believed that violence against women was experienced in the same way by all women. But the Clarence Thomas hearings, the acquittals of William Kennedy Smith and Mark McGraw and the conviction of Mike Tyson have taught me otherwise. As it turns out, the way violence against women is experienced has as much to do with race as with gender. As the Thomas hearings unfolded, I watched reactions around me. The white women I know had no problem making up their minds; we knew we believed Anita Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Different for Girls, a remarkable sex comedy about love in the age of transgenderism, the old boy-meets-girl plot line gets a twist and a snip. Here Boy No. 1 meets Boy No. 2, Boy No. 2 grows up and gets a sex change, and Boy No. 1 falls for her - although Boy No. 1 worries about his feelings. Do his desires for a post-op transsexual make him gay? Does that make any sense? And what will his mates make of it? With generous amounts of humor and humanity, Different for Girls addresses these and other knotty questions of gender and sexual identity.
NEWS
June 30, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
As third graders at Hallowell Elementary School in Horsham got ready for their break in December, they had no idea they would be hearing the name of their classmate - a quiet boy who often played with a group of girls - called for the final time. The transgender student returned to class in January with a new moniker and wardrobe, living as a girl. It was a day many adults in the Hatboro-Horsham District school had been working toward for months, and officials say they were surprised by what happened next.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
RE RONNIE Polaneczky's column on the Gates affair: I am appalled that you see it as "boys will be boys. " It doesn't matter if it was black or white, man or woman. The only thing Mr. Gates had to do when the police came was give them his ID plain and simple. But everybody wants to bring race in and now you claim a woman would handle it better. You also let the cat out of the bag why you show resentment toward police because of the incident with your husband years ago. I understand there are bad cops, but there are also great ones who go beyond the call of duty.
SPORTS
January 21, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The International Olympic Committee is recommending the establishment of special medical centers to deal with athletes who have ambiguous sexual characteristics. The IOC also wants rules put in place by sports bodies to determine their eligibility to compete on a "case by case" basis when gender is called into question. The IOC organized a 2-day conference with medical specialists in Miami to consider guidelines for handling sex-verification cases. The issue gained global attention last year when South African runner Caster Semenya was ordered to undergo gender tests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You'd have to admit that the Quintero family tree is knotty. Pablo Quintero, a celebrated Madrid filmmaker and hedonist, directs raunchy, homoerotic films and stage plays with enough decor to choke a horse. His sister Tina used to be his brother, but when he was a teenager Tina ran away to Morocco with Papa Quintero, who paid for Tina's sex-change operation before leaving her for another woman. Tina became a lesbian, but her girlfriend has just bolted, leaving Tina with her pubescent daughter Ada, who has a crush on "Uncle" Pablo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"I don't like conceptual shows," playwright Joe Calarco says of his high-concept, all-male adaptation Shakespeare's R&J. Mauckingbird Theatre's production of Calarco's script is the Philadelphia premiere of a play that had long, successful runs in New York and London (not to mention Japan and Australia). Currently in previews, it opens Wednesday at the Adrienne. Mauckingbird, which is dedicated to re-viewing classic drama through a gay lens, debuted in January with an all-male production of The Misanthrope, a surprisingly persuasive, as well as entertaining, take on the classic Moliere comedy.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
September 12, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, REAL ESTATE WRITER
I really shouldn't say, "Now I've seen everything," because who knows what tomorrow will bring. Instead, I will, as Phil Rizzuto and Harry Carey (take your pick) would have said, "Holy cow!" It turns out there's a website called www.bObsweep.com that employs Ali Afrouzi as "lead technologist and chief chore expert. " Fair enough. When I was on the Discovery Channel's Home Matters program from 1998 to 2001, cohost Chris McWatt always introduced me as "The Gadgeteer. " But my job was to demonstrate new gadgets I came across at product expositions here and around the country.
NEWS
August 27, 2016 | By Melissa E. Mishcon
  While swimming laps, pretending to be in the Olympics, I overheard a comment, and not about my peculiar breast stroke. A gaggle of young guys were cannon balling into the deep end, having old-fashioned summer fun. Underscore old-fashioned. One dude belly flopped and groaned. The pal in the pool offered solace with: "Ah ... don't be such a girl. " Female gender is still being used as an insult. It's pretty common. I've heard professional sport coaches use something very much like that to chide their team.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Adapted from a recent online discussion. Question: My husband of 10 years recently came out to me as a transwoman. She says she is a lesbian and wants to stay and make it work. I am trying to be supportive, but I am feeling betrayed and weirded-out and pretty sure I'm not a lesbian. When I hide my confusion, she's ecstatically happy to be her real self; when I mention some aspect of my unhappiness, she goes very quiet. I feel sad and alone and confused, and I don't know how much of that to let show.
NEWS
July 29, 2016
By Cynthia Terrell and Susannah Wellford With the convening of the Democratic and Republican Parties, we see greater diversity in their national delegations and leadership than what we currently have in Congress. Women hold less than 20 percent of the seats in the Senate and House, making the United States 95th internationally in the number of women elected to national offices. Imagine if the Senate or House required gender parity for each state? Before completely dismissing this idea, consider this: Both parties already have statewide and national rules requiring gender equality.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax, Advice Columnist
Question: I thought you were right on in your answer to B. from Maine about who pays for dates (Feb. 2). You were correct to suggest kindness. However, I think your answer was a little simplistic when you said, "Note, none of these rules is gender-specific," including, "if you ask someone to dinner, you pay. " Let's be real: The rules are not gender-specific, but the rituals are. Who does most of the asking? Our culture's courtship rituals are based upon gender roles of previous generations.
NEWS
June 10, 2016
By Karen Beckwith As the 2016 campaign unfolds, the continuing story is that women and gender will play major roles in the presidential election. This story does not predict a happy ending for the presumptive Republican nominee. There are more women in the U.S. electorate than there are men, giving women a numerical advantage in elections, and women have turned out to vote at a higher rate than men have since 1980. By 2014, women constituted 52 of the electorate, with 43 percent turnout (compared with men at 48 percent of the electorate, with 41 percent turnout)
NEWS
June 3, 2016 | By Christine Flowers
I HAVE BEEN TOLD by otherwise intelligent, alert, accomplished women that I must vote for Hillary Clinton. Some have said it's because failing to cast my vote for Bill's charming better half will be a de facto "plus one" for Team Trump. While I doubt that is the case, and polls seem to bear me out, it's a fairly respectable argument: Hillary minus me minus many other women equals Donald. But there are also the sisters who tell me I must vote for Hillary because she is a woman, and I am a woman, and It Is Time.
NEWS
April 30, 2016
By David Neumark An aging population, coupled with low employment rates among Americans older than 62, poses severe challenges to the long-term sustainability of Social Security. Numerous reforms have been proposed to extend their working lives, including raising the retirement age. Such reforms may be unlikely to gain traction - not because people are so eager to retire, but because age discrimination sharply limits job opportunities. After decades of debate, most labor economists today accept that discrimination has played a role in limiting job opportunities for minorities and women.
NEWS
April 22, 2016
YOU KNOW what I really resent? I resent it when someone tells me I should vote for, or support, or give a pass to, someone because it will be a "historic moment. " Don't get me wrong. I'm as much a sucker for the grand and melodramatic gesture as anyone. Last weekend, I took my nephew to see the updated version of "Jungle Book," and I was reduced to sobs when the animals banded together to defend Mowgli. Heck, I still get a lump in my throat at that scene in "Spartacus" where all the other slaves rise up to protect Kirk Douglas from crucifixion by saying, "I am Spartacus.
NEWS
April 8, 2016 | By Howard Gensler
WHEN ANSWERING questions about race, religion or gender, a little perspective is always a good thing. In an interview with Cosmopolitan , Scarlett Johansson talked about why she doesn't like to discuss the gender pay gap in Hollywood. "There's something icky about me having that conversation unless it applies to a greater whole," Johansson said. "I am very fortunate, I make a really good living, and I'm proud to be an actress who's making as much as many of my male peers at this stage . . . I think every woman has [been underpaid]
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|