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NEWS
June 4, 1995
The premiere issue of Your Future - "not your father's personal-finance magazine" - poses an age-old question: Is it more expensive to be a woman or a man? Since this is a magazine aimed at folks a generation away from Social Security (and who doubt it'll still be around when they turn 65), the analysis is updated, focused on "typical" single people ages 25 to 34. On what they spend annually for clothes, hygiene, cars, food, entertainment, life insurance and, of course, vices. Some differences are surprising.
NEWS
April 6, 2010
I THANK the Daily News for documenting the protest against SEPTA's policy of putting "male" and "female" stickers on its weekly passes. Because the protest was of a modest size and transgendered riders are a minority, some people may not understand that this problem deserves a great deal of attention. SEPTA's current policy asks drivers to determine a rider's gender, and to expel or accept them on that basis. For any customer whose gender is not obvious - because of his posture, hair or style of dress - this odd requirement leads to confrontations that are humiliating and dangerous.
NEWS
November 11, 2005 | C¬Ěsar Chelala
C?sar Chelala is an international public-health consultant A growing number of countries have adopted population and development policies to meet the health-care and education needs of women. Yet gender inequality persists in most countries around the world. According to the United Nations Population Fund state of world population report for 2005, gender inequality hinders not only the growth of affected individuals but also the evolution of societies and the development of countries.
NEWS
April 30, 1992 | BY REBECCA T. ALPERT
Until this fall, I believed that violence against women was experienced in the same way by all women. But the Clarence Thomas hearings, the acquittals of William Kennedy Smith and Mark McGraw and the conviction of Mike Tyson have taught me otherwise. As it turns out, the way violence against women is experienced has as much to do with race as with gender. As the Thomas hearings unfolded, I watched reactions around me. The white women I know had no problem making up their minds; we knew we believed Anita Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 1997 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In Different for Girls, a remarkable sex comedy about love in the age of transgenderism, the old boy-meets-girl plot line gets a twist and a snip. Here Boy No. 1 meets Boy No. 2, Boy No. 2 grows up and gets a sex change, and Boy No. 1 falls for her - although Boy No. 1 worries about his feelings. Do his desires for a post-op transsexual make him gay? Does that make any sense? And what will his mates make of it? With generous amounts of humor and humanity, Different for Girls addresses these and other knotty questions of gender and sexual identity.
NEWS
August 4, 2009
RE RONNIE Polaneczky's column on the Gates affair: I am appalled that you see it as "boys will be boys. " It doesn't matter if it was black or white, man or woman. The only thing Mr. Gates had to do when the police came was give them his ID plain and simple. But everybody wants to bring race in and now you claim a woman would handle it better. You also let the cat out of the bag why you show resentment toward police because of the incident with your husband years ago. I understand there are bad cops, but there are also great ones who go beyond the call of duty.
SPORTS
January 21, 2010 | Daily News Wire Services
The International Olympic Committee is recommending the establishment of special medical centers to deal with athletes who have ambiguous sexual characteristics. The IOC also wants rules put in place by sports bodies to determine their eligibility to compete on a "case by case" basis when gender is called into question. The IOC organized a 2-day conference with medical specialists in Miami to consider guidelines for handling sex-verification cases. The issue gained global attention last year when South African runner Caster Semenya was ordered to undergo gender tests.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
You'd have to admit that the Quintero family tree is knotty. Pablo Quintero, a celebrated Madrid filmmaker and hedonist, directs raunchy, homoerotic films and stage plays with enough decor to choke a horse. His sister Tina used to be his brother, but when he was a teenager Tina ran away to Morocco with Papa Quintero, who paid for Tina's sex-change operation before leaving her for another woman. Tina became a lesbian, but her girlfriend has just bolted, leaving Tina with her pubescent daughter Ada, who has a crush on "Uncle" Pablo.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2008 | By Toby Zinman FOR THE INQUIRER
"I don't like conceptual shows," playwright Joe Calarco says of his high-concept, all-male adaptation Shakespeare's R&J. Mauckingbird Theatre's production of Calarco's script is the Philadelphia premiere of a play that had long, successful runs in New York and London (not to mention Japan and Australia). Currently in previews, it opens Wednesday at the Adrienne. Mauckingbird, which is dedicated to re-viewing classic drama through a gay lens, debuted in January with an all-male production of The Misanthrope, a surprisingly persuasive, as well as entertaining, take on the classic Moliere comedy.
NEWS
August 10, 2011 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
CHICAGO - Boy or girl? A simple blood test for mothers-to-be can answer that question with surprising accuracy at about seven weeks, a research analysis published in today's Journal of the American Medical Association has found. Though not widely offered by U.S. doctors, gender-detecting blood tests have been sold online to consumers for the past few years. Their promises of early and accurate results prompted genetics researchers to take a closer look. They analyzed 57 published studies of gender-testing done in rigorous research or academic settings.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2014 | By Elizabeth Wellington, Inquirer Fashion Writer
In a Philly heartbeat, Cory Wade Hindorff would strike a runway pose in a miniskirt. And you might even find him walking confidently along Old City's cobblestone streets in six-inch heels. But the 23-year-old, third-place winner on fall's America's Next Top Model , wouldn't call himself a woman trapped in a man's body. Nor would Hindorff, who is gay, want anyone to mistake him for a member of the fairer sex, despite how phenomenal he looks in size 2 Urban Outfitters skinny jeans.
NEWS
February 26, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
A South Jersey mechanical contracting company has agreed to pay a total of $400,000 to resolve allegations that it violated state law by failing to employ female plumbers, including for public-funded projects, the state Attorney General's Office and the Division on Civil Rights announced Monday. The settlement calls for Falasca Mechanical Inc. of Vineland to pay the state $250,000 and pay plumber Bette Feldeisen $150,000 to resolve allegations that it repeatedly hired less experienced and less qualified male plumbers while handling millions of dollars in public works jobs.
NEWS
January 6, 2014 | By Anndee Hochman and Gloria Hochman, For The Inquirer
Second in an occasional series of stories about the new modern family. Erica Solis doesn't remember the Placemat Explanation, but her parents have told the story so often she can recite it herself: She was 4 and sitting at the kitchen table. "If men are there," her mother said, pointing to the left side of a placemat, "and women are over there," indicating the right margin, "then Mama is right about here. " And she gestured to a spot close to the "male" side of the mat. That was seven years ago, before Yoel Solis decided to stop living in that murky middle zone.
NEWS
December 9, 2013 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
It's odd to think of William Shakespeare writing a Christmas play in the same way Hollywood studios release their holiday blockbusters. Yet Twelfth Night, or What You Will, was just that in 1602 - a popular, fanciful entertainment marking the end of Christmas' 12 days and the coming of the Epiphany. There is a noble yet hilarious dreaminess to the play's proceedings - psychic bait-and-switches and twists-upon-truths, wherein servants imagine they can become lords, and ladies dress as men for the sake of romance and, of course, high comedy.
NEWS
November 19, 2013
LET'S TALK about Katie McGinty. For three reasons: Few people are doing so, she had an interesting finish in a recent poll and she could be the surprise of 2014. Philly native McGinty is one of eight announced Democrats seeking to oppose Gov. Corbett next year. She's also one of four expected to a) stay in the race and b) have enough money to compete. The others are Allyson Schwartz, Rob McCord and Tom Wolf. McGinty isn't getting the buzz of front-running Schwartz or of McCord, both of whom get noticed in their current jobs (congresswoman, state treasurer)
NEWS
November 12, 2013
TO CHRISTINE Flowers: I've just read your piece on the Employment Non-Discrimination Act passed recently by the Senate. And although I agree with the assessment that most liberals try to paint conservatives as uneducated bigots, I cannot follow you as you affirm that offering the right to marriage matters less when it comes to fight discrimination. Changing people's minds to make them accept and not tolerate another often happens when they consider the other to be part of the same group (at least on some level)
NEWS
November 4, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
IT'S ALL ABOUT the ceiling. The glass ceiling, that is. Speaking yesterday at the Pennsylvania Conference for Women, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said gender inequality must be erased in America. "Too many women here and around the world still face ceilings, ceilings that hold back their ambitions and aspirations, that make it harder for them to pursue their own God-given potential," Clinton said in her keynote address. "These ceilings just don't hold back women and girls but they hold back entire economies and societies because no country can truly thrive by denying the contributions of half its people," she said, calling remedying gender inequality "the great unfinished business of the 21st century.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
WELCOME TO Mensylvania. That's not a typo. That's a commentary on a national report released last week that gives Pennsylvania a poor grade on the status of women who live here. We got a C-minus on how women fare on economic security, leadership and health. The report, issued by the Center for American Progress, ranked the state 28th out of all 50 states. While women nationally have made progress in all three categories, "Pennsylvania stands out as one of the states that are among the worst in the nation for women.
NEWS
October 1, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
One player stood out during Conestoga High School field hockey practice last week. Quick-footed. Exceptionally skilled. The tallest player on the team. And male. Olivier Everts, 15, has been playing field hockey since he was 6, and the native of the Netherlands said that when he moved to the United States about three years ago, he had no intention of giving it up. So Everts, now a junior, has suited up for Conestoga since his freshman year, donning the same uniform as the girls, kilt and all. For the last two seasons, his coaches say, he's been the team's leading scorer.
NEWS
August 30, 2013 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The increasing number of boys playing on girls' high school teams has altered the competitive balance of some sports, according to recent court filings by the Pennsylvania Interscholastic Athletic Association. But this week, a Commonwealth Court judge declined to modify a 38-year-old injunction that barred the PIAA from engaging in gender discrimination. Instead, Judge B. Kevin Brobson said if the PIAA wanted to ban boys from participating in girls' sports and vice versa, it should establish such a policy.
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