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Gender Equality

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LIVING
July 19, 1998 | By Kristin E. Holmes, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
More than once in the last 20 years, Indian scholar Asghar Ali has been assaulted in the name of God. The liberal Muslim activist has been portrayed as an enemy of Islam and hit by opponents in hotels, at news conferences, and in a mosque. "Conservative people get angry at interpretation of Islam that goes against classical interpretation," says Ali, the director of the Institute of Islamic Studies in Bombay. Much of Ali's work has been devoted to gender equality. He has written books, articles and speeches as part of his efforts to repeal laws that he says oppress Muslim women.
NEWS
May 30, 2008 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
High school boys outscored girls in standardized math tests in the United States. But girls performed just as well as their male counterparts in Norway, Sweden, and other countries with the most economic equality, according to researchers from Northwestern University. But girls outscored boys in reading across all 40 countries the team studied. The findings, published in today's issue of the journal Science, add new insights to a raging debate over gender differences in learning, the relative roles of culture and brain biology, and the question of whether boys or girls are being shortchanged by the school system.
NEWS
March 26, 2003 | By Sally Friedman
March is National Women's History Month, presumably time to reflect on the life and times of the American woman. Did you know? Do you care? I think we women deserve it. But as the mother of three daughters, I'd also like to believe that one of these years we won't even need a special month, because we'll just be accepted as - dare I say it - equals. "Equals" - such an ordinary notion to conceptualize. So extraordinarily hard to implement. Here we are, starting a new century with that famous slogan "equal pay for equal work" still rattling around.
NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday signed an ordinance authorizing a ballot question concerning the creation of a Commission for Women in the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter. "Women continue to earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by men in this nation," said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, who sponsored the ordinance. "Despite representing 52.8 percent of the city population, women occupy only 11 percent of corporate board seats in Philadelphia, and women of color represent less than 1 percent.
SPORTS
September 16, 2011 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Remember last March, when there appeared to be a good chance a hint of sanity would finally come to Public League basketball for 2011-12? So much for that . . . Robert Coleman, the czar of PL sports, announced yesterday that only two of last season's 68 teams have vanished - Horace Furness and W.B. Saul. Coleman said Furness has entered into a cooperative sponsorship with Southern. It's hoped, he added, one between Saul and Roxborough will be finalized shortly. Multiple sources last winter claimed Coleman was looking to reduce the number of teams to 50. Though he did not confirm that number then, Coleman did not dispute it while saying, "I will be meeting with the higher-ups in the school district and we'll come up with a plan that's just and right.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Clara Luper, 88, an Oklahoma civil rights icon who led sit-ins at drugstore lunch counters, died Wednesday after a lengthy illness. On Aug. 19, 1958, as the 35-year-old sponsor of the Oklahoma City NAACP Youth Council, Ms. Luper led three adult chaperones and 14 members of the youth council in a sit-in at the Katz Drug Store lunch counter in downtown Oklahoma City. The drugstore refused to serve the group, but the protesters refused to leave, and the sit-in lasted for several days.
NEWS
April 13, 2013
By Lynn H. Yeakel and Rosemarie B. Greco In the midst of today's discourse on gender equality, it is easy to forget that, a short century ago, women in the United States did not have the right to vote. It was the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920 that breathed life into a movement that shaped political, economic, and social transformation over the next century. Today, with the enthusiastic support of Mayor Nutter, we are proud to announce that Philadelphia will host the nation's 19th Amendment Centennial Celebration in 2020.
NEWS
October 14, 2002 | By Rusty Pray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Robert B. Wallace, 84, a Doylestown agricultural businessman who was concerned with population growth, founded a charitable organization, and discovered a species of bird, died Thursday at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington of complications after a stroke. Mr. Wallace, who was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and grew up in Washington, had been a resident of Doylestown for many years. He also maintained a home in Washington. He was a son of Henry A. Wallace, who served as vice president, secretary of agriculture, and secretary of commerce under President Franklin D. Roosevelt.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Hope Bacon's voice was failing her by 3:30 Wednesday afternoon. "I have a renewed respect for teachers and the long days they have," said Bacon - feminist, active member of the Central Philadelphia Friends Meeting and author of eight books - after a daylong visit with teachers and students at Abington Friends Upper School. Bacon also was getting over the flu, but her hoarse throat did not stop her from talking about her life's work - writing and speaking about Quakers and social change.
NEWS
March 24, 2004
THIS Martha Stewart debacle proves we really haven't progressed as far as we thought we have in regards to gender equality. If Martha Stewart were Martin Stewart, not only would she not have been in court, a plea deal including some bogus community service would have been arranged. I'm not someone overly concerned with women's rights. But what I am concerned with is equality. We claim not to be a sexist society yet Ms. Stewart was raked over the coals in the media for being an "ice queen.
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NEWS
March 27, 2015 | BY LARA WITT, Daily News Staff Writer wittl@phillynews.com, 215-854-5927
MAYOR NUTTER yesterday signed an ordinance authorizing a ballot question concerning the creation of a Commission for Women in the Philadelphia Home Rule Charter. "Women continue to earn 77 cents for every dollar earned by men in this nation," said Councilwoman Blondell Reynolds Brown, who sponsored the ordinance. "Despite representing 52.8 percent of the city population, women occupy only 11 percent of corporate board seats in Philadelphia, and women of color represent less than 1 percent.
NEWS
July 8, 2014 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
Drug companies have been hotly pursuing a fix for female sexual dysfunction ever since Viagra was approved 16 years ago. They keep falling short. The letdowns have been seen as evidence that the fairer sex's sexual problems are tougher to define, diagnose, and safely treat than men's. But now there's a new theory about why women and drug developers can't get any satisfaction: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is sexist. "There are 26 drugs for [sexually dysfunctional]
NEWS
June 18, 2013
Fifty years after President John F. Kennedy signed the Equal Pay Act mandating equality in how men and women are paid for the same job, a huge gap remains. When the bill became law in 1963, a woman earned 59 cents for every $1 a man was paid. Women have become the primary breadwinners in 40 percent of U.S. households with children, but they're only paid 77 cents to the dollar. The pay gap is narrowing slowly, at about a half-cent per year. At that rate, women won't get equal pay until 2058.
NEWS
June 3, 2013
Melissa Chea-Annan is a 2012-13 Hubert Humphrey Fulbright Fellow and visiting journalist at The Inquirer With fewer than 1,000 days for countries to reach their Millennium Development Goals (MDG) by the 2015 target date, many African nations are showing impressive progress. Of course, the global economic crisis has created challenges, and the overall statistics are sobering, but there are definite bright spots in the global fight against poverty and disease. MDGs were created at a U.N. summit in 2000, with eight areas targeted for improvement: poverty and hunger; education; gender equality; child mortality; maternal health; fighting HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases; environmental sustainability; and global development partnerships.
NEWS
April 13, 2013
By Lynn H. Yeakel and Rosemarie B. Greco In the midst of today's discourse on gender equality, it is easy to forget that, a short century ago, women in the United States did not have the right to vote. It was the ratification of the 19th Amendment to the Constitution in 1920 that breathed life into a movement that shaped political, economic, and social transformation over the next century. Today, with the enthusiastic support of Mayor Nutter, we are proud to announce that Philadelphia will host the nation's 19th Amendment Centennial Celebration in 2020.
SPORTS
September 16, 2011 | BY TED SILARY, silaryt@phillynews.com
Remember last March, when there appeared to be a good chance a hint of sanity would finally come to Public League basketball for 2011-12? So much for that . . . Robert Coleman, the czar of PL sports, announced yesterday that only two of last season's 68 teams have vanished - Horace Furness and W.B. Saul. Coleman said Furness has entered into a cooperative sponsorship with Southern. It's hoped, he added, one between Saul and Roxborough will be finalized shortly. Multiple sources last winter claimed Coleman was looking to reduce the number of teams to 50. Though he did not confirm that number then, Coleman did not dispute it while saying, "I will be meeting with the higher-ups in the school district and we'll come up with a plan that's just and right.
NEWS
June 10, 2011
Clara Luper, 88, an Oklahoma civil rights icon who led sit-ins at drugstore lunch counters, died Wednesday after a lengthy illness. On Aug. 19, 1958, as the 35-year-old sponsor of the Oklahoma City NAACP Youth Council, Ms. Luper led three adult chaperones and 14 members of the youth council in a sit-in at the Katz Drug Store lunch counter in downtown Oklahoma City. The drugstore refused to serve the group, but the protesters refused to leave, and the sit-in lasted for several days.
NEWS
March 30, 2011 | By Donna Abu-Nasr, Bloomberg News
DUBAI - Activists among Saudi Arabia's women, who can't drive or vote and need male approval to work and travel, are turning to the type of online organizing that helped topple Egypt's Hosni Mubarak to force change in a system that they say treats them like children. The "Baladi" or "My Country" campaign is focused on this year's municipal elections, only the second nationwide ballot that the absolute monarchy has allowed. The election board said Monday that women would be excluded from the Sept.
NEWS
October 20, 2010
By Lynn H. Yeakel and Rosemarie B. Greco Starting Thursday, "Vision 2020: An American Conversation about Women and Leadership" will gather a congress of national delegates at the National Constitution Center to focus on overcoming obstacles to gender equality. American women today earn about 80 cents for every dollar men earn. Women of color earn less than 62 cents on the dollar. And a recent study showed that over the past decade, women have made virtually no progress toward equal representation in management positions.
NEWS
October 20, 2010 | By ROBERTA D. LIEBENBERG
NO ONE CAN quarrel with the commonsense proposition that equal pay should be given for equal work. Yet nearly 50 years after Congress passed the Equal Pay Act, women in the workplace continue to be significantly shortchanged in pay. Data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics just last month show that the longstanding gender wage gap persists, with women in full-time year-round jobs earning just 77 cents for every dollar earned by their male colleagues....
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